Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

See Wishlist
The Revolution Starts Now
 
See larger image
 

The Revolution Starts Now

24 Aug 2004 | Format: MP3

7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 8.89 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
3:10
2
2:41
3
3:25
4
4:11
5
4:33
6
3:08
7
3:12
8
3:41
9
3:46
10
3:11
11
4:23

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 24 Aug 2004
  • Label: Vanguard
  • Copyright: (C) 2004 Indieblu Music
  • Total Length: 39:21
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00INE0ILG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 83,349 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Andy Barter on 6 Aug 2004
Format: Audio CD
The Revolution Starts Now once again continues Steve's political theme, particularly on the opening and closing tracks "The Revolution Starts Now" as well as on "Rich Man's War" and "The Gringo's Tale". The most political track and one that clearly sums up his dissillusionment with that state of America is "F the CC" and this is also one of the most catchy tracks on the CD with a chorus that you will not be able get out of your head. However where these tracks differ from those on "Jeruslem" is that these are far more instantly accessible and will hopefully appeal to a larger proportion of the record buying public. Other stand out tracks are the beautiful duet with Emmylou Harris on "Comin' Around" and one that you will be singling along to in the car at the top of your voice "The Seeker". Overall in every respect just as brave a political album as "Jerusalem" but also just as importantly a beautiful and easily accessible album
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Sep 2004
Format: Audio CD
Something that's always bothered me about American so-called 'blue collar music' - much as I love it - is that it often relies on the listener to draw their own conclusions about the material. OK in principle, but when people get it wrong (Born in the USA for example) it goes *badly* wrong. There can be no doubt about Steve Earle's intention here - from the title in, this is a political record. And it still rocks like a mother: musically I'm reminded of Tom Petty. Less country than some of his previous work - and closer in spirit to his Copperhead/Aviator period - this is a welcome release from a man who will surely be remembered as one of this generation's great political songwriters - not to mention political motivators. Steve Earle speaks the truth!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Caspersozza on 17 Sep 2004
Format: Audio CD
I have often been ambivalent about Steve's work in the past, been more enamoured of the idea of him than his actual music. But I just got this album today, and all I can say is wow! It completely defies that old axiom about the more direct the politicking, the less satisfactory the art. After just one listen, it sounds like his most exciting and rounded work in many, many years.
It's as if, after being almost flayed alive for something as sensible as trying to understand the American Taliban ('John Walker's Blues'), he has realised that he has nothing to lose in going for the jugular, calling for all-out revolution. But most importantly, the songs are good, the lean rocky sound immediately exciting. On 'F The CC' he lambasts the FBI, CIA etc. with a chant that's an obvious musical tribute to The Ramones' 'Hey-Ho-Let's-Go'. There is musical light and shade - the reggae light of 'Condi, Condi', the heartbreaking ballad 'I Thought You Should Know' and the brilliant midtempo duet with Emmylou Harris 'Comin' Around' - but above all, this is an angry and focused set of songs that rocks and works on almost every level. This is an album that delivers on the heady promise of its title - and just could not be more timely.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Smokey Joe on 19 Sep 2004
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have to confess that the more I listen to The Revolution Starts Here, the more I like it. The tunes are catchy, so if this is a seditious way of infusing political consciousness into the listener then it is certainly working in my case. Steve Earle is "born again hard" when it comes to politics left of centre and given his extensive life experiences on the dark side he may just be in a better position to offer an opinion than the rest of us. The liner notes warn us that Earle and his band saw this release as time dependent given the election year and there is an urgent zeal to some of the tracks - a raggedness which is in my opinion the best way to listen to Earle and his band.
Mind you, it is not all the auditory equivalent of Fahrenheit 9/11 - there is still time for some laid back ballands, including an especially fine duet with Emmylou Harris on 'Comin around' and the excellent "I thought you should know", which ranks up there as one of Earle's best songs. Utlimately, this release is aimed at capitalising on Earle's existing controversial and outspoken views at a crossroads in current US politics; new listeners may want to start further back in Earle's excellent catalogue of releases but for existing devotees the evolution starts here.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jack Crane on 6 Feb 2006
Format: Audio CD
Steve Earle manages to mix politics with good music on this album. A couple of the tracks are a bit heavy going for me i.e The Warrior and Gringo's Tale but there is plenty else to enjoy. Rich Man's war is a beautifully written song with a strong poignant lyric. I liked the depiction of the naivete of the suicide bomber driven to his destination by a 'fat man in a new Mercedes' and I was glad it wasn't politically one-sided. Home to Houston is a good rockabilly tune about being in Iraq. The Revolution Starts Now is an upbeat song about how the 'revolution' of thinking for yourself starts in your street and in your town. I initially thought the swearing in FtheFCC was juvenile but think this presents the feelings and frustrations of a young man and as a 'character' - this is how he would vent his thoughts.
I was more indifferent about the other songs. Earle has achieved something difficult - a 'political' album with good tunes and non-hysterical sentiments. I have played this a lot.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search

Look for similar items by category