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The Republic of Thieves Hardcover – 8 Oct 2013

4.1 out of 5 stars 199 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 8 Oct 2013
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 650 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey Books (8 Oct. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553804693
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553804690
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 4.9 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (199 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,185,464 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Scott Lynch was born in 1978 in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he still lives now. In addition to being a freelance writer for various role playing game companies he has done all the usual jobs writers put in their bios: dishwasher, waiter, web designer, marketing writer, office manager and short-order cook.

Product Description

Review

Lynch layers con and counter-con, twist and counter twist, two new cities and a huge cast of characters, all of it glued together by irresistible prose and fruity, insult-stuffed dialogue. Welcome back, Scott. You've been missed. (SFX)

Lynch has lost none of his flair or ambition. ...Republic [of thieves] has a romantic centre, upon which Lynch layers con and counter-con, twist and counter twist, two new cities and a huge cast of characters, all of it glued together by irresistible prose and fruity, insult-stuffed dialogue. Welcome back Scott. We've missed you. (Dean Evans SFX MAGAZINE)

Scott Lynch has upped his game in every sense, and any epic fantasy I read after this is going to have a damned difficult act to follow. (overtheeffingrainbow.blogspot.co.uk)

It is a well-written and overall thrilling book that will keep you engaged until late into the night. (theroamingbard.wordpress.com)

Locke Lamora is proving to be one of the most engaging and enigmatic characters in fantasy, reading his voice is pure delight. (SFFWorld.blogspot.co.uk)

Scott Lynch is undoubtedly a master of the modern fantasy genre. (Paul Holmes THEELOQUENTPAGE.CO.UK)

Everything fans of The Gentleman Bastards are waiting for, and a lot that they won't expect. (bookwormblues.net) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

He's back! The long-awaited return of the most exciting new commercial fantasy writer of the 21st century. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
While the first two books were full of intrigue, plots, lies, twists and surprises, this book feels sort of one dimensional in comparison. The plotting and scheming take second place to a character background saga which does not fit with the other two books. I should have realised it was going like this when fully 30% of this novel deals with how Locke gets out of the certain death he faced at the the end of the second book. The remaining two thirds is split between his present 'adventure' and a historical background about his early life. This does not leave any time for the complex scheming and surprises found in the first two novels and so it turns out to be just a quite well written story which seems to be a link to the next book.

Overall, I was expecting more. I am now wondering whether to read the 4th book when it comes out - I will probably wait to see the review comments
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Suffers from the same problem as Red Seas... in that it does not hold a candle to the original book. The revelation of Locke 's past and the return of an old enemy during the epilogue seem shoe-horned in as an excuse to extend the series. Each book loses more of what made the first so awesome. The flashback is more interesting than the actual continuation of the present day plotline, but there were whole chapters dedicated to the characters performing a play. This is a book that seems to go nowhere but is still recommended for the interaction between Locke, Jean and Sabetha.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I absolutely adore the first two books. I can say without a doubt The Lies of Locke Lamora is the best book I've ever read, and Red Seas Under Red Skies is a very close second. It's been a long while since I've read the first two as I've been busy and haven't had the time to read the third, but even still, all it takes is the quote from all three books 'a glass poured to air for an absent friend', to get me sobbing. It is the first two books which have caused me to become so sensitive. The plot's, mixed in with the depth of characters and the beautiful description of the locations, the first two are quite literally perfect in my opinion. However, the third book is a failure, and the only reason it has 3 stars rather than the one is my love for the series. The series is good. This book is part of the series and is essential (at least I presume it is) to read if you want to continue reading it without getting lost.
First off, the characters.
Sabetha, the mysterious woman from the first two books, the captivating woman who is the love of Locke's life. Turns out to be nothing but a petulant bitch with as much grip on her emotions as a spoiled six year old.

Locke was completely destroyed in this book, and I think the blame lies on the introduction of Sabetha. Rather than being a book about a witty, quick thinking man trying to rig an election with an unlimited amount of money at his disposal, it turns into more or less a romance novel with locke being the soft mushy lovestruck male chasing after the girl with 'all the worries and troubles in the world.'

Jean, well, he didn't disappoint as much as the rest. He was his usual self just he didn't have a lot to do since most of the book seemed to revolve around Locke and Sabetha's love.
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Format: Hardcover
My suspicion is that this novel suffers a bit from being a necessary step into the bigger events that will shape the next four in the series (which hopefully aren't as many years in coming as this one). It has its strengths but they get a bit lost in the mix.

The chapters are divided between the present time and flashbacks to the characters' pasts. This format was also used in both the prequels if memory serves. I liked the backstory for a lot of elements - We get a bit more of Father Chains' brilliant and often hilarious charaterisation; some light is shed on Sabetha's previously mysterious character; and it introduces a band of interesting characters, some or none of which we may ever see again. Finally it explored some of the rites and doings of the cult of the Nameless Thirteenth, which was great- the secret God of Thieves is one of my favourite elements of Lynch's world.

However, the main plot just doesn't flow quite as we've come to expect from Locke Lamora. The first two books were full of narrow escapes, life-and-death double-crossing, twists and the occasional gritty fight scene. Here, the two remaining Gentlemen Bastards are press-ganged into rigging an election , so while there is a great deal of scheming, plotting and political intrigue, most of it is seen at one remove. There is a sense of great activity going on in the background but not that it actually matters that much. Locke and Jean are at the helm of a vast political machine rather than the thick of it for much of the novel, and while some of the moves and countermoves are brilliant, the GBs are essentially guaranteed to be free from harm win or lose.
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Format: Hardcover
*** This review contains potential spoilers if you haven't read books one and two in this series ***

The Republic of Thieves is essentially two books for the price of one.

The first follows on directly from the events of Red Seas Under Red Skies. Locke and Jean are on the run, attempting to avoid the fallout from their last scheme that went slightly awry. Becoming powerbrokers in the political arena seems a sensible idea, at least at first. The arrival of an old friend however adds an unexpected wrinkle to their latest "fool proof" plot.

The second narrative strand goes back in time and follows the teenage Gentleman Bastards as they take to the stage. Their ever-enigmatic mentor, Father Chains, demands they leave Camorr for the summer and assist an old acquaintance with his troupe of slightly deranged actors.

For a while now Mr. Lynch has lead us a delightfully merry dance. The character of Sabetha Belacoros has been mentioned in passing multiple times, but has never really been fully explored. Sabetha has been the lingering shadow that has hung over Locke's past. She's the one that got away, as it were. Finally meeting her has been a long time coming, and her introduction is handled wonderfully.

I've been trying to think of the best way to adequately describe the connection that exists between Sabetha and Locke. The closest thing I can equate it to is the relationship that Sherlock Holmes has with Irene Adler. The verbal sparring, where they continually try to outdo one another is a joy. Locke has more than met his match and I reckon, much as he would try and deny it, in his heart he knows it.
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