Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen with Prime Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars18
4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
12
4 star
6
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 7 May 2012
This book should be in classrooms for it puts in simple phrases how over the millions of years the believe in gods evolved through the mind and carried forward during the years.
This book puts evolution of the mind where it should be.
Cogratulations to Craig A James.
0Comment|10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 November 2011
"The Religion Addiction" seems a more appropriate title for this book. Most people want to cure a virus, but few are willing to give up their addictions. However, "Religion Virus" is probably a more catchy meme. And the whole point of this book is that what is passed on from person to person ain't necessarily the truth but the most appealing message.

Craig James takes you on a tour that includes genetic evolution, the history of religion, memes, quotes from famous non-believers and skeptics, and personal interludes. Using the concept of memes, Craig shows how religions evolved. His writing style is informal and engaging--it made his book a thoroughly enjoyable read!
0Comment|8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 October 2012
James takes a less angry tone than Dawkins in the God Delusion and expands on the evolution of religious belief in a highly readable and thought-provoking book.
His contribution to the topic can only help humanity make peace with itself.
0Comment|8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 November 2011
A well structured and informative read.
A compelling argument for not subjecting our children to religions or superstitions in their early years.
Memes and how they evolve is clearly explained, and illustrated, a process that we all should be aware of,
in addition to what we already know of genes and genetic evolution.
0Comment|7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 May 2014
A detailed study of the evolution if religious ideas using memetics. For anyone interested in the role of religion in the development of western culture. As an atheist it makes sense. Having been brought up Catholic it illustrates my path to understanding that God is a purely human construct.
0Comment|3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 February 2014
Craig James very successfully compares and contrasts the evolution of genes in species, with the evolution and (some disastrous) effects of 'memes', since humans evolved the ability to communicate through speech. It is a fascinating and thought provoking read and it does indeed give a very plausible explanation for the extraordinary hold that religion has on so many humans. It is easy to read and compelling in its conclusions. The only criticism I have is that it is replete with dozens of typos, which kept jumping off the page and distracting me. Considering this was a second edition,they should have been eradicated long since. There were so many, and some so annoying, that they eventually began to somewhat spoil an otherwise very worthwhile read. I don't think it can have been proof read or properly edited at all. Ignoring all that, four stars for the good book that it otherwise is.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 March 2013
I bought it and wished I could give it to everyone I know and love as it is so well written. Excellent!
Buy it now!
0Comment|3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 March 2013
The author is not primarily an evolutionary biologist, but is extremely well read. He develops Dawkins' memes concept to a sophisticated level. For example, gene selection only works on the individual, and so does meme selection. Hence, the religion meme may give the individual some perceived benefits (comfort, community etc), but actually be bad for society. This is illustrated by the `tragedy of the commons'. Read the book to find out what that means.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 17 August 2015
An interesting book. It offers an explanation which is plausible. As with most 'viral' infections there is little likelihood of a cure. Fascinating!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 February 2014
This is an excellent book that describes why many believe something so entirely implausible. The evolution of the "Virus" is particularly interesting and it continues before our eyes. One can now buy a book called "The Bible" without the old testament, is this because that has become so implausible?
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)