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The Regeneration Trilogy: Regeneration, The Eye in the Door, The Ghost Road Hardcover – 6 Nov 1997


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Viking; 1996 First Edition, 5th Printing edition (6 Nov 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670869295
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670869299
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 5.2 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 109,883 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Pat Barker's books include Union Street (1982), winner of the 1983 Fawcett Prize, which has been filmed as "Stanley and Iris"; Blow Your House Down (1984); Liza's England (1986), formerly The Century's Daughter; The Man Who Wasn't There (1989); Another World; Border Crossing; and the highly acclaimed Regeneration trilogy, comprising Regeneration, The Eye in The Door, winner of the 1993 Guardian Fiction Prize, and The Ghost Road, winner of the 1995 Booker Prize for Fiction. Her latest novel is Life Class.

Barker's powerful early novels Union Street (Virago) and Blow Your House Down (Virago) memorable books celebrating the individuality of the lives of 'ordinary' women. After this the focus of her writing shifted slightly and her Regeneration trilogy was widely praised for its astute and unflinching portrayal of issues of violence, sexuality and class against the backdrop of World War One. The violence of the First World War also coloured the backdrop of Pat Barker's next novel, Another World, which looked at its effects on following generations and this theme is picked up again in Border Crossing.

Pat Barker was born in Thornaby-on-Tees in 1943. She was educated at the London School of Economics and has been a teacher of history and politics. She lives in Durham.


Product Description

Review

Harrowing, original, delicate and unforgettable (Independent)

A masterpiece . . . fiction of the highest order (Sunday Express)

A new vision of what the First World War did to human beings, male and female, soldiers and civilians. Constantly surprising and formally superb (A. S. Byatt Daily Telegraph)

One of the few real masterpieces of late twentieth-century British fiction (Jonathan Coe)

One of the most distinguished works of contemporary fiction (Barry Unsworth) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

Pat Barker's 'Regeneration Trilogy', – ' Regeneration, The Eye In The Door' and ' The Ghost Road' – interweaving fact and fiction, characters historical and imagined, wry humour and harrowing observation, tells not so much the familiar story of the horror of the trenches, but rather of the psychological damage the Great War inflicted not only on the nation's doomed youth but on that entire generation which also served.

The trilogy has won Pat Barker the 1993 'Guardian Fiction Prize', the 1995 Booker Prize and acclaim as the Booksellers' Association Author of the Year.

Paul McGann, the star of 'The Monocled Mutineer, Withnail and I' and 'The Hanging Gale', and a reader of rare nuance and subtlety, gives a quietly understated performance in keeping with Barker's literary style.

Contains 'Regeneration, The Eye in the Door' and 'The Ghost Road'

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
I am making this statement as an act of wilful defiance of military authority, because I believe the war is being deliberately prolonged by those who have the power to end it. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 April 2001
Format: Hardcover
Pat Barker has a way of bringing her characters to life that I have rarely encountered before. This is a wonderful trilogy that highlights the true impact of WW1 and the conditions experienced there on the psyche. It creates a very strong vision of what it must have been like for ordinary men to find themselves taken away from their homes and placed in a world of mud and death and incessant noise. It also explores the relationship between men, both sexual and non-sexual and provides a fascinating insight into the development of psychology that took place during WW1. I have read Birdsong, but still find myself reaching for the Regeneration trilogy time and time again. The Eye in the Door is the weakest of the three novels, but this is more than compensated for by the wonderful Ghost Road. These novels are made more poignant by the fact that many of the characters existed in real life, and the views of war portrayed by Pat Barker can be substantiated and expanded by reading their poetry, and that of other war poets
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Miss Dewhirst on 11 Oct 2005
Format: Hardcover
I had to read the first book in the trilogy - "Regeneration" for my A Levels and when i saw the book and read the blurb i immediately thought "how boring is this going to be?" Yet when i eventually forced myself to start reading it, i was gripped by the end of the first chapter and within a week i'd bought and read the rest of the trilogy too! Contrary to other reviewers, my favourite book was The Eye in The Door, which contains a lot more politics and is also moving and very graphic with sexual imagery and other topics. Actually, the other two books were pretty moving and graphic too so be wary if you're a bit prudish! The first book in the trilogy concentrates on the poet Seigrfried Sassoon, his friendship with another poet Wilfrid Owen and a fictional officer called Billy Prior, who are all convalescing in hospital after suffereing shellshock, with the aid of the doctor, Rivers. The second concentrates more on Billy Prior, with some references back to Sassoon and Owen and the third is mostly about Prior and their doctor in the hospital, the real Dr W H Rivers. All three books contain connotations about homosexuality(something that was then illegal) and also the usual wartime book themes about the brutality and pointlessness of war. Don't dismiss them (as i almost did) as historical tat, they are all three, fantastic novels that bring out emotions and make you fully realise the futility of war and the complexity of psyhcology. Pure, Grade A Excellence!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 Feb 1999
Format: Paperback
These three books take us through the horrors of the First World War, though without judgement on the rights and wrongs of war. In the first part of the trilogy, the war poet Siegfried Sasson has been sent to Craiglockart, and Edinburgh rehabilitation centre for the shell-shocked. In fact, he is not mentally ill, but has refused to fight; as an officer, he was sent to Craiglockart to preserve his honour. There he is treated by the psychologist, William Rivers, and we encounter his other patients. It is through the eyes of Rivers and his patients that we feel the effects of the war. Wilfred Owen, the young and promising poet, is also a resident, and we are also introduced to the surly Billy Prior. It is his story and that of Rivers that carries the story through the second and third part of the trilogy. This book is wonderfully readable; the terrible experiences of the patients are presented, in their full horror, for our own analysis and fact and fiction are seamlessly interwoven. The first part is certainly the strongest of the three, but to read only one would be missing out.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By helen.oleary@clara.co.uk on 9 May 2001
Format: Hardcover
I too read the book over a year ago and I still think about it a lot. I've just visited Flanders - both Belgium and France and my interest in the First World War stemmed from reading this trilogy.I think a large part of my enjoyment was because many of the characters actually existed. The film 'Regeneration' is good too. Anybody interested in WW1 and has enjoyed 'Birdsong' and also the work of the poets Sassoon and Owen will thoroughly enjoy this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Aug 1999
Format: Hardcover
I could not put it down and read it in a single long haul flight over night. The description of life during the first world war, both in France and at home was both realistic and thought provoking. Although the eye in the door was weaker than the others in the trilogy, the whole is much greater than the sum of its parts, encompassing every part of the human condition. The accounts of Rivers' work was as enthralling as the action in the trenches, altogether a stunning piece of literature, fully deserving the booker prize
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Didier TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 8 Oct 2007
Format: Hardcover
When it comes to literature on war and what it does to man, few novels outdo Pat Barker's Regeneration trilogy. They may take place during WW I, but they have a relevance far beyond the Great War. My personal favorite is 'Regeneration', the first volume of the three, but all of them are world class literature. If I were in favour of the concept (which I'm not), this should be compulsory literature to each and everyone.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Liz on 25 April 2006
Format: Hardcover
I first read Regeneration when i was lent it at school to read for my A-Levels, it was the first war literature i had ever read and i wasn't expecting to enjoy it! However when i finally started reading it i couldn't put it down and as soon as i finished it i got 'The eye in the door' and 'the ghost road' from the library.

The whole trilogy is incredibly impressive, and if anything they just get better,the trilogy is extremely realistic and Barker's flawless interweaving of both past and fiction is a credit to her unsurpassable writing style.

I am now studying English at uni and chose WW1 as a module to study, partly so i could re-read Regeneration. The second reading is just as good as the first, if not more poignant and this will always be one of my favourite books.

This trilogy ignited an interest that i may never have discovered and for that it will always remain a favourite read. Barker is a master at confronting the taboos of war and forcing the reader to face the reality of the damage that this war caused emotionally and physically.

If you're interested in WW1 literature or have to study it for A-levels make sure you read this book because it is one of the best examples of WW1 literature in existence!
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