The Queen 2006

LOVEFiLM By Post

Britainís largest choice of DVDs and Blu-rays to rent by post £7.99 per month.

Start your 30 day free trial

Existing LOVEFiLM member? Switch account

Prime and Prime Instant Video members can receive unlimited discs, two at a time, for £6.99 per month after trial.

(148) IMDb 7.4/10
LOVEFiLM By Post

Stephen Frears' critically acclaimed portrait of the English Monarch in time of strife. One of the most turbulent times in British politics in recent memory seen from an insider's perspective - an almost documentary look at the relationship between the figurehead and the brains behind the UK. It's 1997 and Tony Blair's Labour Government has just won an election, ending 18 years of Conservative rule. Blair the firebrand (Michael Sheen) must introduce himself to the Queen (Helen Mirren) and ask permission to govern the country. The stone-faced Regina, in accepting, gives him not a millimeter of slack, silently underscoring the fact she's in charge. Shortly thereafter, the former Princess of Wales, wife of Elizabeth's son and heir, is killed in Paris. The Queen's initial reaction is to hold ranks and treat Diana as an outsider, being that she has left the royal household. Blair senses the coming landslide of public opinion against this course of action and tries, as hard as a new boy can, to make her majesty see sense. The question of who's truly in charge comes to the fore.

Starring:
Helen Mirren, Michael Sheen
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_12_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 45 minutes
Starring Helen Mirren, Michael Sheen, Sylvia Syms, James Cromwell, Roger Allam
Director Stephen Frears
Genres Drama
Studio PATHE DISTRIBUTION
Rental release 12 March 2007
Main languages English
Discs
  • Feature ages_12_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 45 minutes
Starring Helen Mirren, Michael Sheen, Sylvia Syms, James Cromwell, Roger Allam
Director Stephen Frears
Genres Drama
Studio UNIVERSAL PICTURES UK
Rental release Currently unavailable
Main languages English

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
This item has not been released yet and is not eligible to be reviewed.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By smeng on 5 July 2007
Format: DVD
I didn't know what to expect from this film at all. But since the film had a strong showing at the Oscars... at least Helen Mirren did, I thought I'd give it a go. Was expecting serious drama but it was actually a very witty take on the royal family during a rather tragic event. It showed a whole different side to the royals and rather realistically too so much so that it could be true. Brilliant lines from the Queen Mother by the way, watch out for those scenes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
49 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Ian A. Macfarlane TOP 100 REVIEWER on 20 Feb 2007
Format: DVD
This is a very interesting film, portraying as it does the mismatch between the Royal Family's immediate response to the death of Princess Diana and what a large section of the British public wanted of them. In the week after the accident, public hysteria ran high and, in failing to respond to that, the Family suffered a severe public relations knock. No-one knows more about public relations than spin-crazy Tony Blair and his media manipulator-in-chief, Alistair Campbell, and in the film they are shown to have a far surer grasp of what would 'work' with the public than does the Queen, whose wishes are essentially family-based, centring on an old-fashioned emphasis on privacy and the protection of her bereaved grandsons. But she comes across as a far more sympathetic character than Blair and Campbell. This is partly because of an excellent screenplay and partly because of Helen Mirren's outstanding and uncannily 'right' performance ; partly also because, at this distance, we can see that there is something awful about the disproportionate wildness of the public grief - tons and tons of flowers, hysterical weeping in the streets and so on - which the Queen, a woman from another age whose whole training is based on reserve and control, would find alien and unsettling, particularly as the relationship with Diana had become very strained, for whatever reasons. All of this comes across entirely convincingly in the film. In addition, it tells a very good story and is, in places, unexpectedly funny. So, an unusual film, a one-off, very well done
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Andrew Moore on 16 Jun 2007
Format: DVD
Hype as ever follows any film expected and/or actually winning Oscars, Baftas and other awards. Often the critically acclaimed are not as popular with the public, but this film truly deserves all the praise and awards it received.

We all know the story; Dianna dies in a car crash and the public grief the entire country showed while the royals stayed largely out of the way. Are the events shown in the film accurate? I don't know but they certainly could be. Well acted by everyone even down to an uncany impression of Tony Blair, cheesy grin and all, this is a powerful film for most ages. My wife and I took our two children to see this, they were 5 and 8 years and both loved it which I did not expect. My daughter wanted to know more and this started a lot of reading and asking/answering of questions. We've now watched this some three or four times and every time found something new. Its full of emotion as you would expect but it takes you from tears of sadness to tears of joy. A gammut of emotions and truly rewarding.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By DAVID BRYSON TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 11 Jun 2007
Format: DVD
There are several themes to this excellent and most original and interesting film; but what it is about more than anything else is how political regimes and whole dynasties can be undone on account of a single error of judgment. It is only near the end that Her Majesty warns her prime minister that this will happen to him, and happen suddenly and without warning. It had nearly happened to her, he had been the saving of her on this occasion, and her dire prediction for him probably holds an uneasy message for herself too.

At the start the Queen is full of regal self-assurance, neatly putting her boyish and slightly nervous novice of a prime minister in his place by telling him he is sitting where Churchill once sat. In next to no time the positions are reversed, as Blair's acute political antennae tell him that HM is in imminent danger of losing her subjects' allegiance, something that would have been unimaginable only days previously, through trusting her own judgment and listening to the advice of her husband and her mother in respect of how to react to the death of Princess Diana. Throughout the crisis Blair is adroit and sure-footed, the monarch is made to realise bitterly from the newspapers how he has it right and she has been hopelessly at sea, but unlike her family counsellors she has the wit to swallow her pride and retrieve the situation before it slides beyond retrieval. This one incident could have undone a lifetime of unswerving dedication, universally acknowledged, to her country, and put the skids under the House of Windsor itself. Her warning to Blair is really made from a new sense of respect and a shocked realisation of how quickly and brutally the tables can turn. And how right she has been.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
50 of 54 people found the following review helpful By David Hackston on 30 Jan 2007
Format: DVD
Having lived outside the UK for most of the time that has passed since Princess Diana's death, it's interesting to revisit that moment in history from a foreign context, almost as an outsider. Sitting in the cinema this evening, I was struck by the notion that perhaps only Brits can truly appreciate the significance of the British monarchy, and thereby also fully understand what it is that makes this film such a towering piece of cinema.

As another reviewer has pointed out, Elizabeth II is omnipresent, permeating every facet of British society, and it is in its very attention to detail that "The Queen" triumphs. At first I was taken aback by the striking similarity between the actors and their real-life counterparts: Helen Mirren (who deserves the Oscar for this, perhaps her greatest performance) is frighteningly like the Queen in every respect, right down to pronouncing "Diana" with the stress on the first syllable - something only the Queen does. Michael Sheen's Blair was spot on too: that nervous chuckle, the grin, the walk. James Cromwell is uncannily like the Duke of Edinburgh...

I'd forgotten that these events took place almost immediately after New Labour's accession to power, and thinking of things in these terms sheds new light on the significance of the public reaction. The Tories had finally been kicked out of Westminster, there was a great sense of expectation, of change, and the questioning of the monarchy's relevance seems to go hand in hand with that new-found optimism. The film reminds us that Blair at least set out to be a "moderniser", and the Queen even asks whether he is "planning to modernise us".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search