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The Pyramid: With an introduction by Penelope Lively [Paperback]

William Golding , Penelope Lively
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: 8.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Book Description

1 Aug 2013

With an introduction by Penelope Lively

Oliver is eighteen and wants to enjoy himself before going to university. But this is the 1920s and he lives in Stilbourne, a small English country town where everyone knows what everyone else is getting up to, and where love, lust and rebellion are closely followed by revenge and embarrassment.

Written with great perception and subtlety, The Pyramid is William Golding's funniest and most light-hearted novel, probing the painful awkwardness of the late teens, the tragedy and farce of life in a small community and the consoling power of music.

'Golding depicts with subtle skill all the pains of growing up and growing old. He treats us to some superb comic episodes.' Daily Telegraph

'Golding's most approachable novel and a curiously personal one, that returns to the mind again and again as if the shames and idylls were one's own.' Guardian

'Neatly drawn, funny and touching ... The snap, the tang, and the tension in Golding's prose is always a pleasure.' Harper's Magazine


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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber (1 Aug 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571298524
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571298525
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 12.6 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 183,993 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

William Golding was born in Cornwall in 1911 and was educated at Marlborough Grammar School and at Brasenose College, Oxford. Before he became a schoolmaster he was an actor, a lecturer, a small-boat sailor and a musician. A now rare volume, Poems, appeared in 1934. In 1940 he joined the Royal Navy and saw action against battleships, submarines and aircraft. He was present at the sinking of the Bismarck. He finished the war as a Lieutenant in command of a rocket ship, which was off the French coast for the D-day invasion, and later at the island of Welcheren. After the war he returned to Bishop Wordsworth's School in Salisbury and was there when his first novel, Lord of the Flies, was published in 1954. He gave up teaching in 1961.

Lord of the Flies was filmed by Peter Brook in 1963. Golding listed his hobbies as music, chess, sailing, archaeology and classical Greek (which he taught himself). Many of these subjects appear in his essay collections The Hot Gates and A Moving Target. He won the Booker Prize for his novel Rites of Passage in 1980, and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983. He was knighted in 1988. He died at his home in the summer of 1993. The Double Tongue, a novel left in draft at his death, was published in June 1995.

Product Description

Book Description

The Pyramid, widely considered to be Golding's funniest and most accessible novel, is now re-issued in a stunning new cover style.

About the Author

William Golding was born in Cornwall in 1911 and was educated at Marlborough Grammar School and at Brasenose College, Oxford. Before he became a schoolmaster he was an actor, a lecturer, a small-boat sailor and a musician. His first novel, Lord of the Flies, was published in 1954. He won the Booker Prize for his novel Rites of Passage in 1980, and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983. He was knighted in 1988. He died at his home in the summer of 1993.

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5.0 out of 5 stars Village People 29 May 2014
Format:Paperback
William Golding sets these three interlinked stories in the village of Stilbourne (pun intended), a bus ride away from the town of Barchester, near Omnium. Moreover, a girl for whom protagonist Oliver has an adolescent yearning is called Imogen Grantley, so we are immediately in the Trollope country of the Barchester Chronicles and the Palliser novels. WG establishes this artificial literary context, I reckon, to distance his work from any suggestion of autobiography, though it is suffused with what feel like intensely personal memories. You get three sections for your money, each showing Oliver at a different time of his life, and Stilbourne at a different stage of its evolution. The funniest is the account of a dreadful amateur musical theatre production, superintended by a visiting gay director who drunkenly tries to pull our hero without quite managing to be honest, which few of the characters are. There's pathos here too, though - most of the people to whom Oliver is closest have stunted, emotionally deprived or abused lives - and the "crystal pyramid" of the social order to which they all pay obeisance is unrelenting in its demands. The quality of the writing is superb throughout, especially at the end as a middle-aged Oliver admits to himself an important truth he has long denied and motors away from Stilbourne for the final time, sadder but wiser. We are too.
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