Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Pyramid [Paperback]

Ismail Kadare , David Bellos , Jusuf Vrioni
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Paperback --  
Paperback, 24 April 1998 --  
Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Book Description

24 April 1998
Tyranny flourishes in the shade of the pyramids. Everyone, including the Leader, lives under the iron law of slavery.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Paperback: 119 pages
  • Publisher: The Harvill Press (24 April 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1860461247
  • ISBN-13: 978-1860461248
  • Product Dimensions: 21.2 x 13.4 x 1.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,288,798 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

A vast, deep, obsessive parable. Like every parable, its fundamental significance transcends its apparent meaning -- Figaro

Kadare is patently a world-class novelist and prose poet -- Boston Globe

From the Publisher

When Cheops decreed that he did not want a pyramid built for him, the court sages were left aghast.

Translated by David Bellos from the French version of the Albanian by Jusuf Vrioni


Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Eery, Haunting and Suspenseful Novel 24 Oct 2004
Format:Hardcover
Ismail Kadare takes a historical event of 2,600 years ago, the building of the Pyrmaid of Cheops, and creates an eery and suspense filled novel. There are intrigues and plots, and political purifications. Clearly, the monument is a testament to the human beings who built it, their spirit, creativity, their blood, sweat, and tears. However, is there some grand design, some master plan, something more, might it not represent the infinite, something eternal? Read the book and decide ...
It all starts out innocent enough, the High Priest recommends a project, building a pyramid to the Pharoah who at first is opposed to the idea. Then, like any good monarch or president, he appoints a committee to study the matter. The research falls short of expectations. To the disappointment of all, or perhaps, just to this reader, it is discovered, the past pharoahs did not build the pyramids for any grand and glorious reason. They did it just because they were rich, had an overabundance of wealth, which they used up, that's all. At first the public is appalled, another pyramid is to be built, everyone ... everywhere is a buzz with, how much time, effort, and resources will it take? The plans, the building materials, the workmen, the supervisors, even diplomats of foreign countries, all are intrigued with this grand scheme. Eventually the psyche of the country is totally obsessed with nothing but this project. Many years go by, decades go by, as the project continues, and nears completion ... Kadare weaves his plot masterfully, capturing how this huge event affects the people of Egypt from all walks of life, from the peasant, to the merchant, to the highly educated scribes and aristocracy ... the parallels to modern life are astonishing.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dark poetry 31 July 2006
By GRBD
Format:Paperback
An icon of European literature, and winner of the 2005 Man Booker International Prize, Kadare serves up a thinly-veiled attack on the excesses of a communist dictatorship. When Pharaoh Cheops decides he doesn't want a pyramid, his courtiers remind him of the need to build in order to suppress freedom of spirit. Darkly poetic and wilfully bleak, but he sometimes dwells a little on the words and not the meanings.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining and Frightening 13 May 2002
By Jeffrey Leach - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I have four Ismail Kadare books, and since the semester just ended, ...[I'm] going to try and read all four of them this summer. Kadare is an Albanian expatriate living in France, and from what I've heard about his books, the overarching theme is either the elevation of Albanian culture or criticism of the Albanian Communist Party. In this book, Kadare takes us back to ancient Egypt during the reign of Cheops, the pharaoh who built one of the Seven Wonders of the World. What we take for granted today as an impressive monument to ...[man's] ability to create, Kadare sees as a different sort of monument. Kadare uses the pyramid of Cheops as an allegory for the dehumanization of political power.
The upper echelons of Egypt become concerned when Cheops decides he does not want to build a pyramid. His advisors tell him that a pyramid is necessary in order to head off potential unrest amongst the populace. When Egypt is prosperous, the advisors explain, the people are not occupied and may start to have dangerous thoughts. A pyramid is a long, involved process that will keep all noses to the grindstone. What follows is a nightmarish vision of power run amok. All of Egypt becomes devoted to the pyramid, with every resource available poured into its construction. Workers die by the thousands cutting the rocks, transporting the stones, and building the pyramid. Thousands more are tortured and murdered for poor workmanship or because of conspiracies that arise during construction. Even the pharaoh starts to go nuts, as the pyramid becomes a reality.
Kadare masterfully details the dangers of power without limits. Arguably, the finest chapter is the one where time itself is reduced to numbered building stones. Workmen no longer think in terms of minutes, hours, or days; they think in terms of the 10,000th stone, and then stone 10,001, followed by stone 10,002. You get the idea. In short, the pyramid turns society and the very idea of nature upside down.
...
This is probably the best book you've never heard of. Of course, if you're reading this review, you have heard of Kadare and you're thinking about reading his work. I'm certainly looking forward to his other efforts, and the guy is still pumping them out so there won't be a shortage of his books anytime soon. Albania tends to get short shrift in the world; they should be very proud of Mr. Kadare. Although this book is quite short, it has a lot of depth. Recommended.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Eery Novel: Haunting & Suspenseful 16 Jun 2003
By Erika Borsos - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Ismail Kadare takes a historical event of 2,600 years ago, the building of the Pyrmaid of Cheops, and creates an eery and suspense filled novel. There are intrigues and plots, and political purifications. Clearly, the monument is a testament to the human beings who built it, their spirit, creativity, their blood, sweat, and tears. However, is there some grand design, some master plan, something more, might it not represent the infinite, something eternal? Read the book and decide ... It all starts out innocently enough, the High Priest recommends a project, building a pyramid to the Pharoah who at first is opposed to the idea. Then, like any good monarch or president, he appoints a committee to study the matter. The research falls short of expectations. To the disappointment of all, or perhaps, just to this reader, it is discovered, the past pharoahs did not build the pyramids for any grand and glorious reason. They did it just because they were rich, had an overabundance of wealth, which they used up, that's all. At first the public is appalled, another pyramid is to be built, everyone ... everywhere is a buzz with, how much time, effort, and resources will it take? The plans, the building materials, the workmen, the supervisors, even diplomats of foreign countries, all are intrigued with this grand scheme. Eventually the psyche of the country is totally obsessed with nothing but this project. Many years go by, decades go by, as the project continues, and nears completion ... Kadare weaves his plot masterfully, capturing how this huge event affects the people of Egypt from all walks of life, from the peasant, to the merchant, to the highly educated scribes and aristocracy ... the parallels to modern life are astonishing. The building of the pyramid becomes the ruling force in the lives of the people. The novel is highly complex and has great depth. It becomes a psychological thriller that the reader can not put down. Although a short novel, it is packed with unsettling moments that remain with the reader, long after one finishes reading the book. Based on this novel alone, any reader can understand why Ismail Kadare is recommended for the Nobel Prize in Literature. Erika Borsos (erikab93)
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cheops, alias Enver Hoxha 26 Sep 2003
By Luc REYNAERT - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The pharaoh Cheops decides to construct his own pyramid in order to suck all the wealth out of his country and prevent a higher living standard for his empire's population.
Indeed, as his counsellors whispered in his ears, when the living standard of a population rises, people become freer and more critical and endanger the dominance of the almighty powerful.
The construction of the edifice turns into a mass slaughtering. The pyramid becomes a symbol for endless human suffering and death under a despotic regime.
Of course, this book is a reflection on the political situation in Albania under the communist tyrant Enver Hoxha, but it is also a magisterial general evocation of a totalitarian ghost state, with only hidden agendas, invented complots, infighting, creation of incidents and rumours, and all that only in function of the mood and hallucinations of the tyrant.
The interrogations, tortures and executions for 'who ever knows' what reasons, create an atmosphere of terror in the whole country. The entire population becomes the plaything of the cynical and deadly machinations of the tyrant and his subservient clique.
This formidable novel is written in an unstoppable, passionate, fanatic flood of dashing prose.
A masterpiece.
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Terrifying 21 July 1998
By Richard Thurston - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Aside from the translation, which is stilted and occasionally inappropriate (unlikely idioms appear in odd places), this is a harrowing little book. The Egyptian Pharoah Cheops and the story of construction of the pyramid which bears his name is the basis for an elegant parable. The casual brutality with which the tyrant exercises power seems as appropriate to ancient Egypt as it does to a Stalinist Soviet Union a Maoist China or Enver Hoxa's Albania.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The pyramid as a character 29 May 2004
By "mythologue" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The passages which evoke the actual building of Cheops' pyramid are extraordinarily powerful and impossible to forget; still, it is less the 'physical pyramid' than all it represents that Kadare seeks to illustrate - the shape it takes in the minds of many men, from the builders to the pharaoh, from the pillagers to the dignitaries. Among the pyramid's various symbolic connotations, he is especially fascinated by the power linked to it, by the hubristic ambition emanating from each of its individual pieces as well as from its finished form. Despite his deeply non-obscurantist approach, Kadare does not desacralize the pyramid: its religious/esoteric dimension is included in, rather than evacuated from, its overall significations. As the title indicates, the pyramid is indeed the book's central character - all the humans are affected by its mysterious, ineffable and frightening presence. So is the reader of this book...
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xac793024)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback