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The Psychopath Test Paperback – 5 Jan 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; Main Market Ed. edition (5 Jan. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330492276
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330492270
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.9 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (535 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 117 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jon Ronson is an award-winning writer and documentary maker. He is the author of many bestselling books, including Frank: The True Story that Inspired the Movie, Lost at Sea: The Jon Ronson Mysteries, The Psychopath Test, The Men Who Stare at Goats and Them: Adventures with Extremists. His first fictional screenplay, Frank, co-written with Peter Straughan, starred Michael Fassbender. He lives in London and New York City.

Product Description

Review

‘I began The Psychopath Test late at night, tired, dispirited and ill – then found myself laughing like the proverbial loon for page after page’ Will Self, Guardian

‘The belly laughs come thick and fast – my God, he is funny . . . Ronson’s new book is provocative and interesting, and you will, I guarantee, zip merrily through it’ Observer

Book Description

The new Sunday Times top-ten bestseller from the author of The Men Who Stare at Goats.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

244 of 270 people found the following review helpful By HeavyMetalManitou VINE VOICE on 3 May 2011
Format: Paperback
'People who are psychopathic prey ruthlessly on others using charm, deceit, violence or other methods that allow them to get what they want. The symptoms of psychopathy include: lack of a conscience or sense of guilt, lack of empathy, egocentricity, pathological lying, repeated violations of social norms, disregard for the law, shallow emotions, and a history of victimizing others.'
- Robert Hare, Ph.D

I've been hooked on Jon Ronson's writing since 'The Men Who Stare at Goats' was first published. Ronson cuts right to the heart of important topics by having the guts to ask the difficult questions. His literary style is equal parts journalistic rigour, deep compassion and incisive observational humour that often shines the light of ridicule on darker human behaviours. 'The Psychopath Test' explores psychiatry, psychopathology, medication and incarceration of 'dangerous' individuals. The book reads like a mystery novel, which - driven by Ronson's compelling prose - makes it difficult to put down.

The story begins with a meeting between Ronson and a history student who has received a cryptic book called 'Being or Nothingness' in the mail. The same book has been received by several individuals around the globe, most of whom work in the field of psychiatry. The book contains 42 pages, every second one blank. (This made me wonder...in 'The Hitch-hiker's Guide to the Galaxy', the ultimate answer to life, the Universe and Everything was 42. Was this relevant? Was the mysterious author of 'Being or Nothingness' implying that his cryptic messages, if decoded, could lead to enlightenment?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Guy on 2 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First thing to say is that this is very Jon Ronson - if you don't like his journalistic, quite anecdotal, interview-heavy style, you won't like it. I, however, enjoyed his attempts to get the nub of what Psychopaths are and how Society can deal with them.

He gets to inverview some really interesting as well as important figures in the field, and his various digressions are always relevant and valuable. The chatty style doesn't obscure the fact he's really done his homework. In particular, he's really good on the tale of how professional rivalries and experimental treatments by various psychologists since the early 20th Century haven't always been to the benefit of a better public understanding of the condition, or better treatment of it.

His particular focus is the now almost universally used testing criteria for Psychopaths, which turns out to be not as perfect as you might hope considering a positive result can see people incarcerated for large portions of their life. He also investigates how 'Psychopathic' traits can actually be seen in many people who are successful in various fields and have never been involved in any violent crime. There's ultimately a suggestion here that the most terrifying thing about Psychopaths is that they're really not as different from us as we'd like to think, and it is quite possible that your neighbour, boss, political representative, or local policeman (psychopaths, it turns out, love jobs which give them positions of authority) could well be one.

Despite the troubling revelations here, it isn't a sensationalist book trading off shock value.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gina on 1 July 2012
Format: Paperback
A friend who studies psychology recommended this book to me knowing that I've long fostered an interest in psychology. For me, therefore, the book was perfect - having no academic grounding in psychology, I would probably struggle with an academic paper on psychopaths, but I found this book to be very well pitched to the masses. It was as light and accessible as a book with such a serious and delicate subject matter could be.

I have always been fascinated by psychopathy and psychological illness more generally, and it really catered to that interest, with original and intriguing material - a real page turner, which I find is rare in books with a 'heavy' subject. However, even if psychology isn't really your bag, Ronson's style and approach makes it a compelling read, and you'll find yourself freaking out your friends and family with 'so unbelievable it has to be true' type stories for ages.

My only criticism is that I suppose I would have liked him to delve a little deeper, analyse a little more - he frequently touches on the question of whether psychopathy, and other mental illnesses, are simply labels thrust by society onto individuals who don't fit the mould, but he never seems to say anything very solid on the matter. I'd also have liked to have read more case studies of less 'extreme' psychopaths - he seems to go for fairly high profile ones, but claims (I think) that 1/100 people are now considered psychopathic, and I assume (hope!) not all of these are homicidal rapists!

Despite these criticisms, I realise that the book is intended to be a 'popular' read, not an in depth analysis of psychopaths, and indeed Ronson makes it clear that he is in no position to provide such an analysis. This in mind, the book is really fantastic, and I'd recommend it to just about anyone.
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