The Private Press (Limited Edition)
 
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The Private Press (Limited Edition)

14 July 2009 | Format: MP3

£8.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
1:09
30
2
4:49
30
3
0:44
30
4
2:26
30
5
6:29
30
6
4:59
30
7
2:20
30
8
2:58
30
9
4:19
30
10
6:44
30
11
2:58
30
12
9:09
30
13
7:03
30
14
0:55
30
15
6:13
Disc 2
30
1
12:40


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 7 Aug 2009
  • Release Date: 7 Aug 2009
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Universal-Island Records Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 2002 Universal Island Records Ltd. A Universal Music Company.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:15:55
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KPSNBW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 68,882 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 May 2002
Format: Audio CD
Genius is arguably the single most abused word in the English language, its common, offhand usage numbing it of much of its pure potency. But its hard not to place DJ Shadow under that label, as he's done the impossible. He's produced an album that is as good as its predecessor, "Entroducing" (an album that has been hailed as a classic).
Its much broader in style and feel than "Endtroducing" and has much more of an innovative type production than his regular cut and paste ethic. Take the track "Monosyllabik" for example: a basic two-bar sample that is shredded and ripped up into tech-funk which sounds like Roy Ayers being produced by Aphex Twin. Another track that is unlike anything heard before by Josh Davis is "Mashin' On The Motorway", it features MC Lateef clumsily crashing into other drivers over a K-Hole funky baseline. Its this sparkling originality that helps me compare this album to other favourites like David Holmes "Lets Get Killed".
But Mr. Davis does tread into older territory with "Walkie Talkie": a scratch-happy thumping beat that has a baseline that feels like a chainsaw buzzing through your head. Here you can refer to his previous classics like "The Number Song" and "High Noon".
Also "Blood On The Motorway" is a beautiful piece of epic soul that reminds us of how deep "Entroducing" was. But this album is not as emotionally weighted as "Endtroducing". It has a brash sense of fun throughout the album. With the twisted skits bouncing around and "You can't go home again" sounding like an instrumental 80's New York pop song that never departs from Shadow's incredible production values.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Abbas Rana VINE VOICE on 4 Dec 2002
Format: Audio CD
The hooded genius returns with his first solo album of the millennium. DJ Shadow - aka Josh Davies - was responsible for giving the world the haunting and beautiful 'Midnight In a Perfect World' single in 1997. He collaborated with James Lavelle on UNKLE to produce an arrray of splendid tracks, namely 'Be There', 'Rabbit In Your Headlights' and the ultra-cool 'Guns Blazing'.
On this record, Shadow loses the overt guitar riffs and decides against featuring any high-profile vocalists. There are still a fair few characteristic spliced and chopped samples on this record and some more bizarre than ever. Yet it is the amazingly written and produced 'Blood and the Motorway' that grabs the most attention. Emotive Foreigner-esque (for all you eighties fans) vocals sit on synthesized swansong organs and the result is incredible.
There are a couple of infectious instrumentals too where Shadow combines stripped and raw hip hop beats with electronica hooks. 'Giving Up The Ghost' is one such track that springs to mind. Shadow proves that he can still scratch and sample as good as anyone else on 'Walkie Talkie' - a funky ditty powered by heavy basslines.
Admittedly, Private Press takes a few listens before you truly appreciate the array of intelligent and creative sounds and its impressive hooks and beats. It's a clever album and Shadow isn't even afraid to get a little breakbeat and dancey with us on 'Right Thing'. If we're talking about the greatest music artists of our time, Shadow would definitely be up there.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 May 2002
Format: Audio CD
It's been six years since Shadow released the ground breaking 'Endtroducting', and six years is a long time to wait for a fully fledged follow up. But was it worth the wait?
When I first listend to it fully, I was a little disappointed. But the more I listend the more it grew. There really is only two points where the record falls down. First being 'Monosylabik', a track created round a 2 bar loop. There is no denying the talent and how pain staking it must have been. But the track is too long and the texture of it bland. The second falling down point is 'Mashin' On The Motorway' A full rap vocal track about a road rage driver creating havoc on the road. The track is delievered with humour and is far too throw away.
The rest of the record shows a man who has not lost his spark. Do not expect to hear 'Endtroducing part 2'. Shadows went out of his way too make sure that the listener can only make limited comparisons. There are elements of electronica,80's synth and 80's hip-hop and all sit comfortably together.
The First major player is 'fixed Income' a big live sounding beat track with lovely guitar and piano sections layered over the top. 'Walkie Talkie' is a simple breakbeat track which transends into an industrial sounding horn. But the first epic is just around the corner.
'Giving Up The Ghost' has all the qualities that I love about Shadows instrumental music. Etheral sounding with a lovely beat and drving bass. It's a slow burner which gradually exposes it's full potential. A real jem on the record. '6 Day War' sees Shadow using a mostly full vocal sample from a 70's psychedelic rock track based around the Israel attack on Egypt, Syria, Jordan and Iraq in 1967, called, yep, 'The 6 Day War'.
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