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The Prince, the Princess and the Perfect Murder Paperback – 13 Mar 2014


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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Coronet (13 Mar. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1444776479
  • ISBN-13: 978-1444776478
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.4 x 20 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 740,190 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Andrew Rose (from a from a long line of Scots doctors and lawyers) was educated in Dorset and at Trinity College, Cambridge. He practised as a criminal law barrister in London and sat as an Immigration Judge between 1999 and 2007.

Andrew is particularly interested in British social, legal and political history 1900-1950. His first two titles, Stinie: Murder on the Common (Bodley Head 1985; Penguin 1989) and Scandal at the Savoy (Bloomsbury 1991; Fusosha Japan 1993) have strong biographical elements. Each book explores a notorious Old Bailey murder trial, challenging the original verdict and offering a detailed factual re-assessment, largely based on previously closed official material. Stinie (which was shortlisted for the Gold Dagger Non-Fiction Award of the Crime Writers' Association) reveals a wrongful conviction based on perjured testimony in the 1911 Clapham Common murder case. Scandal at the Savoy - about 'Madame Fahmy' and the 1923 Savoy Hotel shooting - shows how unscrupulous defence tactics can sometimes allow the guilty to walk free from court. Both books explore issues of race, sexuality, and culture set against the social and political backdrop of their time.

Lethal Witness (Sutton Publishing 2007; Kent State University Press USA 2009) is a biography of Sir Bernard Spilsbury, the pioneer pathologist variously dubbed "the Father of Forensics" and "the living embodiment of mythical Sherlock Holmes". As before, Andrew has gained access to previously closed Home Office, Metropolitan Police and other files. He charts his subject's rise and fall as a media star, from the 1910 Crippen trial until his bizarre suicide in 1947, revealing how "the Honorary Pathologist to the Home Office" put spin on the facts, embellished evidence and played games with the truth. Spilsbury's (often flawed) 'positive evidence' for the prosecution led to the conviction and execution of men innocent of murder.

Andrew's latest book The Prince, the Princess and the Perfect Murder will be published on 4 April by Coronet in the UK and, later in the month, as The Woman Before Wallis: Prince Edward, the Paris Courtesan, and the Perfect Murder in the USA. A true story, never told before, about Edward VIII's first great love, a secret from WW1, about its extraordinary consequences, involving blackmail and murder, and a superbly choreographed cover-up by members of the British Establishment.

Andrew has been a contributor to several TV and radio programmes, including C4's The Last Secret of Dr Crippen (2004) and Was Crippen Innocent? (2008) on C5, as well as making appearances on ITV1's recent series Forensic Casebook. He has also given lectures and talks about his books.

Andrew is a member of the Society of Authors and the prestigious Biographers' Club.

Product Description

Review

Andrew Rose cracks the case in dramatic detail, turning up compelling new evidence. (The Times)

The story of Marguerite...is fascinating not only for what it reveals of this far from appealing personality but for the social history of the time and of that glittering and decadent world, both in Paris and Cairo. Andrew Rose was himself a judge and his lengthy account of the trial is magnificent. (The Spectator)

Rose has written a gripping book, enhanced by his elegant style and sharp eye for detail. (Press Association)

Book Description

The royal family's darkest secret and the establishment cover-up

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

60 of 63 people found the following review helpful By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 Mar. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Long before causing constitutional crisis by abdicating to marry Wallis Simpson, Edward, then Prince of Wales, was embroiled in another scandal. This involved the young Prince being his usual indiscreet self by penning extremely personal letters to Marguerite Alibert, who later married (and was accused of murdering) her Egyptian multi-millionaire husband in the Savoy Hotel. This sorry and, rather sordid, tale was published some time ago as "Scandal at the Savoy" and is long out of print, so it is good to read this new edition, which the author assures us contains a great deal of new evidence.

Marguerite Alibert, far from being a 'Princess', was the Parisian daughter of a cab driver and a charwoman. Pregnant at sixteen, her future looked bleak, but she had a strong will and a quest for upward mobility. She reinvented herself, became a high class escort and the mistress of rich and influential men. In Paris she met, and began an affair with, the young Prince of Wales. When he cast her off for Fridie (Winifred) Dudley Ward, Marguerite's less attractive qualities emerged and she attempted to blackmail Edward with the many letters he had sent her, containing explosive and personal information and causing Special Branch to become involved. Marguerite was herself an explosive character, in an extremely hedonistic time. Her first marriage ended quickly in arguments and divorce - her second ended in murder.

When Marguerite was accused of murdering her handsome and incredibly wealthy husband, Ali Kamel Famy bey, there was an emotive and theatrical trial at the Old Bailey. It was 1923 and during the melodramatic trial, there was much public sympathy for a young woman "lured" to the East.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By LovetowatchTV on 26 July 2014
Format: Hardcover
The book arrived promptly and was exactly as described. This book is more about "the Princess" (who wasn't a princess) than the former Prince of Wales. What is revealed about the Prince is certainly interesting and some of it has rarely if ever been in the public eye before, though knowing what we do about him now there are few real surprises. The "Princess" of the title was a humbly-born French courtesan who, it would appear, stopped at nothing in pursuit of wealth. The author pads out the book by going into rather a lot of detail about many subsidiary characters and events which, while interesting, sometimes makes it difficult to focus on the book's central theme. There are also numerous typographical errors, indicating that the text was not proof-read carefully enough before going into print. "The Woman Before Wallis" by the same author is, in fact, exactly the same book with the title changed for an American audience. It has absolutely nothing to do with Wallis Simpson, who didn't arrive on the scene until at least a decade after the events described in the book. An interesting read, with enough on the Prince to merit inclusion in any collection about him.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By stephen barlow on 25 Dec. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Quite an interesting book about the antics of a French high class prostitute and her connection to the future Edward VIII.While thousands of men were dying in the mud of WW1 trench warfare Prince Edward Windsor was galivanting about Europe having the time of his life with his aristocratic friends.At some point during this period he met up with a woman of easy virtue known by several names but most popularly "maggie meller".The prince wrote 100's of letters to this woman leaving himself open to a future blackmail attempt and years later when maggie shot her Egyptian husband dead in a London hotel a deal was made with the establishment to make sure she was found innocent of murder.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Desdemona on 21 May 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Interesting and accurate regarding the ethics and mores of the times. It is perhaps a bit too pedantic, returning to points and re-emphasising them although they have already been thoroughly rammed home. I couldn't help but wonder what on earth would have happened to the Royal Family if all this had happened in the days of the internet, etc. Such a cover-up simply would not have been possible. Frankly, the goings-on make our current Royalty's shenanigans look like fairly tame stuff.

But once again, I must return to this problem of Kindle sub-editing. This was a properly published book, not an e-books only edition, but still suffered from misprints and errors - favourite in this book seems to be errant question marks. I hope this problem will improve in time.
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There are simply no books that come remotely close to Philip Ziegler's Optus "King Edward VIII". However Andrew Rose has perhaps gained some of the ground with a superlative book here.

Every character has been introduced and given a decent biography whilst been correctly woven into this highly informative volume. The context used by the author is by virtue of substantial research.

Given that the evidence is incomplete (not the fault of the author in any way), the reader is relayed everything that has so far been made public by the release of secret service files, recently published diaries and anecdotes, and fragments of actual primary sources previously thought destroyed but now available.

This book adds favourably to the reams of work on Edward VIII. But in doing so, is worthy of respect where other efforts have gone wanting.

The author's references are extensive. The photos are a good selection. The grammar is excellent. The storytelling transports you back to "the long weekend" and the great war travesty that prefaced the period.
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