The Politics of Genocide and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in Yours
For a 0.14 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading The Politics of Genocide on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Politics of Genocide [Paperback]

Edward S. Herman , David Peterson
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: 10.95
Price: 10.93 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 0.02
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Usually dispatched within 6 to 11 days.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 3.70  
Hardcover 38.00  
Paperback 10.93  
Trade In this Item for up to 0.14
Trade in The Politics of Genocide for an Amazon Gift Card of up to 0.14, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Book Description

25 May 2010
In this impressive book, Edward S. Herman and David Peterson examine the uses and abuses of the word "genocide." They argue persuasively that the label is highly politicized and that in the United States it is used by the government, journalists, and academics to brand as evil those nations and political movements that in one way or another interfere with the imperial interests of U.S. capitalism. Thus the word "genocide" is seldom applied when the perpetrators are U.S. allies (or even the United States itself), while it is used almost indiscriminately when murders are committed or are alleged to have been committed by enemies of the United States and U.S. business interests. One set of rules applies to cases such as U.S. aggression in Vietnam, Israeli oppression of Palestinians, Indonesian slaughter of so-called communists and the people of East Timor, U.S. bombings in Serbia and Kosovo, the U.S. war of "liberation" in Iraq, and mass murders committed by U.S. allies in Rwanda and the Republic of Congo. Another set applies to cases such as Serbian aggression in Kosovo and Bosnia, killings carried out by U.S. enemies in Rwanda and Darfur, Saddam Hussein, any and all actions by Iran, and a host of others.With its careful and voluminous documentation, close reading of the U.S. media and political and scholarly writing on the subject, and clear and incisive charts, The Politics of Genocide is both a damning condemnation and stunning expose of a deeply rooted and effective system of propaganda aimed at deceiving the population while promoting the expansion of a cruel and heartless imperial system.

Frequently Bought Together

The Politics of Genocide + Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction
Price For Both: 38.82

One of these items is dispatched sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Monthly Review Press,U.S. (25 May 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1583672125
  • ISBN-13: 978-1583672129
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 13.9 x 1.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 282,232 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Edward Herman and David Peterson have written a superb study of the uses of the term `genocide'. Herman is Professor Emeritus of Finance at the University of Pennsylvania and Peterson is a journalist and researcher.

In 1973 Noam Chomsky and Herman wrote that the USA has "been the most important single instigator, administrator and moral and material sustainer of serious bloodbaths in the years that followed the Second World War." They cited the cases of the Philippines (1898-73), Thailand (1946-73), Palestine (1948-), Vietnam (1954-73), Central America (1954-), Indonesia (1965-69), Cambodia (1965-73), East Pakistan (1971) and Burundi (1972), More recently, Iraq (1990-), Rwanda (1994), the Democratic Republic of Congo [DRC] (1998-2007) and Afghanistan (2001-) have joined the grim list.

Herman and Peterson examine killings in Sudan, Yugoslavia, Rwanda and the DRC. They also study war crimes committed by US allies Israel, Croatia, the Northern Alliance in Afghanistan, Turkey, Indonesia, El Salvador and Guatemala.

They note that the International Criminal Court, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda all exclude the crime of aggression from their jurisdiction. (Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch likewise exclude aggression from their remit.)

When, in 1999, the Yugoslav government asked the International Criminal Court to issue an injunction against the NATO powers bombing it, the US government replied that it had `not consented to the Court's jurisdiction in this case, and absent such consent, the Court has no jurisdiction to proceed'. The Court agreed that it `cannot decide a dispute between States without the consent of those States to its jurisdiction'.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars MUST HAVE for every "aware" person 8 April 2011
Format:Paperback
In 90s I was just a boy growing on Balkan and thought that people of USA, UK and other traditional Serbian allies were manipulated by Croatian, Bosnian and later Kosovo Albanian propaganda and was angry. I thought they didn't know what was really happening and that Serbian enemies won media war while loosing the one on the field.

With help of this book also I today believe have a clue what have happened and I am not angry anymore but disappointed that Clinton administration can consider themselves being part of "civilized and democratic world".

Visit also Lord Byron's foundation for Balkan studies website and read more.

The truth is the highest aesthetics and can not be suppressed. Thanks to Herman and Peterson we didn't have to wait too long.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  14 reviews
14 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good study of the propaganda uses of the term 'genocide' 7 Sep 2010
By William Podmore - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Edward Herman and David Peterson have written a superb study of the uses of the term `genocide'. Herman is Professor Emeritus of Finance at the University of Pennsylvania and Peterson is a journalist and researcher.

In 1973 Noam Chomsky and Herman wrote that the USA has "been the most important single instigator, administrator and moral and material sustainer of serious bloodbaths in the years that followed the Second World War." They cited the cases of the Philippines (1898-73), Thailand (1946-73), Palestine (1948-), Vietnam (1954-73), Central America (1954-), Indonesia (1965-69), Cambodia (1965-73), East Pakistan (1971) and Burundi (1972), More recently, Iraq (1990-), Rwanda (1994), the Democratic Republic of Congo [DRC] (1998-2007) and Afghanistan (2001-) have joined the grim list.

Herman and Peterson examine killings in Sudan, Yugoslavia, Rwanda and the DRC. They also study war crimes committed by US allies Israel, Croatia, the Northern Alliance in Afghanistan, Turkey, Indonesia, El Salvador and Guatemala.

They note that the International Criminal Court, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda all exclude the crime of aggression from their jurisdiction. (Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch likewise exclude aggression from their remit.)

When, in 1999, the Yugoslav government asked the International Criminal Court to issue an injunction against the NATO powers bombing it, the US government replied that it had `not consented to the Court's jurisdiction in this case, and absent such consent, the Court has no jurisdiction to proceed'. The Court agreed that it `cannot decide a dispute between States without the consent of those States to its jurisdiction'. The US state puts itself above the law it enforces on others.

Herman and Peterson recount how in April 1994, the Tutsi-led Rwandan Patriotic Front, falsely alleging that the Hutus were conspiring to commit genocide. (Later, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda did not find any Hutu guilty of conspiracy to commit genocide.) The RPF killed Rwanda's Hutu President Habyarimana and began the mass killing: as the genocide started, the US and British governments successfully pressed for UN troops to leave. The Tutsi minority bloodily overthrew the democratic coalition government, killed two million people, mostly Hutu, and forced millions to flee Rwanda.

US allies Rwanda and Uganda repeatedly invaded the DRC in the 1990s and since: in 1998-2007, 5.4 million were killed, 20 times the toll in Darfur. In 2003-9, the US media used the word `genocide' 90 times as often of Darfur as of Iraq, where three times as many were killed. (The US-British sanctions of mass destruction (1990-2003) had killed 800,000 people; the war and occupation killed more than a million.) The International Commission of Inquiry on Darfur rejected in 2005 the charge of genocide against the Sudanese government.

The authors provide a mass of challenging evidence that the USA and its allies use the term genocide as a propaganda weapon against their enemies, while themselves committing worse crimes with impunity.
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fine addition to any political studies collection 17 July 2010
By Midwest Book Review - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
There are few atrocities greater than genocide, but why does it so often go ignored? "The Politics of Genocide" delves into recent Genocides and why it has been used more often for political gain than anything else. This analysis asks many questions and provides many examples and discussion about various recent genocides from Darfur to Kosovo to even events like those that often happen in Israel's relations with Palestine. "The Politics of Genocide" is a fine addition to any political studies collection.
13 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Troubling look at the quality of academic "Genocide Studies" and NGOs 14 May 2010
By A. Stamm - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I'm not sure what I was expecting when I purchased this book. I am familiar with Chomsky and Herman's work on the Propaganda Model (Manufacturing Consent), with Chomsky's work on the state of liberal academics (Objectivity and Liberal Scholarship), and I've read much the same material cited in this book (particularly the books of Sam Powers, Philip Gourevitch, Alex de Waal). Somehow, though, I hadn't ever pieced it together the way Herman and Peterson do.

Herman and Peterson make the point that the terms genocide, massacre, and ethnic cleansing are applied with zeal towards official US or European enemies, and that they are almost entirely absent in descriptions of genocides, cleansings, and massacres carried out by the US or it's favored states. Parallel to this are the mainstream scholars in Genocide Studies and in various human rights organizations, who tend to accept the prevailing standards of what constitutes genocide (or not) uncritically, or outright collude in the propagation of such biased standards.

I've been wondering for some time whether to subscribe to Monthly Review magazine, which comes with a discount on books they publish. This book has definitely convinced me to do so.
1.0 out of 5 stars A Book to be Disregarded 19 July 2014
By Mark Gudgel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book, aptly named, is one of the most poorly researched and poorly sourced texts in the field of genocide studies today. The authors' comparisons and remarks in the chapter about Darfur make it evident that their knowledge about the world of genocide, as a retired professor of finance and an "independent researcher," respectively, is woefully limited. They repeatedly fall back upon an ill-conceived series of charts they have created, which, though mildly interesting, give little useful information. However, these flaws pale in comparison to the chapter on the Rwandan Genocide, which falls clearly into the category of genocide denial. A childish use of inflammatory language does little to mask a very one-sided and inaccurate examination of what took place in Rwanda in and around 1994. Poor, erroneous, and questionable sources are used to support the case for "double genocide," while more credible research is overlooked. What accurate statements are made by the authors are then grossly misinterpreted. They seem to rely upon a perceived (or hoped for) ignorance on the part of their readers. While the authors attempt to paint a picture in which black is white, and in which the RPF committed a genocide against the Hutu in 1994, a picture that utterly and completely disregards the role of the French, and which suggests an interest in Rwanda on the part of the United States that is a fantasy in the least, they give away their skewed revisionist agenda very early on. Genocide revisionism is a dangerous plague in our society; the shoddy scholarship of the authors of this book are guilty of the final stage of genocide: denial.
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars political econmy of human rights it ain't 16 Oct 2012
By Brenden J. Vigus - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The work Herman did with Chomsky was very carefull and accurate. This book may be pretty much correct on most topics, but it's not a gread source of information (it's a pretty slim book). In regards to some topics they mention I'd recommend The Fateful Triangle, Pity the Nation, Defending the Holy Land, Political Economy of Human Rights vols 1 & 2, and Leave None to Tell the Story.

I have to give this one star because Herman and Peterson flatly deny a planned and executed extermination of Tutsi in Rwanda. Kagame indeed killed tens of thousands during this time; for the authors this isn't enough. In their mind, the majority of violence was exacted by the invading RLF, and the majority of the dead in the country were Hutu. Reading their responses to critiques of this position, I was absolutely disgusted. So much skirting! They talk at length about style, about authors they know... it's absolutely shameful. There is a literal mountain of first hand testimony relating to the '94 genocide. In fact the whole international community stood and watched on the ground and didn't intervene. H&P's evidence backing their assertion that this bulk of evidence is incorrect is breathtakingly thin. They have the statement of one general in the genocidal government and correspondence with his lawyer, and they mention that the main author of Leave None to Tell the Story worked for the U.S. in the past. Objectively, this doesn't do a damn thing to overturn that mountain of first-hand testimony. Honestly, H&P hung themselves out to dry with their section on Rwanda. Shame on them.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback