Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Place of the Lion Paperback – Dec 1978


See all 31 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£8.28
Paperback, Dec 1978
£25.06 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Paperback: 206 pages
  • Publisher: Eerdmans; New edition edition (Dec. 1978)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802812228
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802812223
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 14 x 19 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,537,904 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Charles Williams (1886-1945) was a writer who excelled in a number of different genres. He was a novelist, dramatist, theologian and literary critic. He belonged to The Inklings: C. S. Lewis liked him, J. R. R. Tolkien didn't. T. S. Eliot admired him as a novelist, published his final novel at Faber and was responsible for the reissuing of the earlier six. All seven novels are being reissued in Faber Finds: War in Heaven, Many Dimensions, The Place of the Lion, The Greater Trumps, Shadows of Ecstasy, Descent into Hell and All Hallows' Eve. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Adam F. Dupre on 17 Jan. 2005
Format: Paperback
The language of this book is dated, but if you can overcome this distraction, it will introduce you to a perspective on the place and significance of human life that is awesome in its scope. This is a life changing book.
Charles Williams writes in a clear and cogent style. He was a poet as well as novelist, critic and theologian, and the respect for words and language that this implies gives his writing a refreshing lightness and directness. For Charles Williams, human beings are of crucial and real significance in the Order of the whole of Existence, though there is a necessary development for each of us from ignorant and 'fallen' state to the redeemed and fully human condition. In a way all his books are about this transformational journey.
In this novel, on entering into a kind of trance, a 'spiritualist' of some kind (not described in the book - and as a character he is of little importance in the novel) becomes the unconscious channel by which the archetypal Meanings and Forms that underlie and summarise material existence start to manifest into the material realm, gathering their different and multiple expressions into their own cohesive singularities. The hero of the book is required in his turn to become the original Adam, the first human, and essential mankind in all of us, and re-enact our common forefather's original balancing of the emergent creation by naming each material thing and thus re-endowing it with its particular and unique existence. Man, as the focus of creation, thus has a single but one function of summarising and unifying the manifestation of exoistence, and at the same time distinguishing it into its myriad vaied forms.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Bradford on 13 Dec. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I can't claim to be an expert on The Inklings, of which Charles Williams was one - the more famous members being C.S.Lewis and J.R.R.Tolkien, of course. This certainly is no usual book. As a novel it does not stand up at all, but then it was clearly not supposed to. The novel structure is merely an artifice for the presentation of metaphysical/religious ideas. From my limited knowledge it seems consistent with The Inklings perspective in that the theme is essentially a challenge regarding how seriously you can take metaphysical ideas. Very seriously indeed, is, I suspect, The Inklings' answer, and certain this is so here. In the book, Platonic ideals, or Angelic Powers, actually become physically manifest. That they also create havoc in the world is rather a strained notion but, I guess, it is the only way of inserting the dramatic element essential for the novel structure. The great Naming denouement very much reminded me of Aslan's naming of the animals in Narnia. I wonder if this was conscious or unconscious on C.S.Lewis's part (the Narnia books being later). The book is easy enough to read - as long as you do not attempt to make sense of every sentence.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
"The Place of the Lion" is definitely the strangest novel I've ever read. But then, I admit that I don't usually read novels. Unless they are pretty strange, that is. ;-)

Charles Williams belonged to The Inklings, together with C. S. Lewis, Owen Barfield and J. R. R. Tolkien. He was a university lecturer, and a prolific writer of novels, poetry and works of Christian theology. Williams' Christianity was pretty non-traditional, however, probably being inspired by A. E. Waite's esoteric-mystical Rosicrucian order (a split from the Golden Dawn). An analysis of certain aspects of Williams' religious message can be found in R. J. Reilly's "Romantic Religion", although Reilly attempts to minimize Williams' connections to Waite and occultism, such things not being respectable among the high society literati. Unfortunately, Reilly says very little about "The Place of the Lion", one of Williams' most well-known works of fiction, first published in 1931.

The plot is set in a trivial small town somewhere outside London, Smetham, which is suddenly invaded by supernatural creatures taking the form of animals. The creatures turn out to be Platonic Forms running amuck, after a local "spiritual teacher" has managed to pierce the veil between our world and the divine or spiritual world. Unfortunately, he has contacted the Forms for immoral and selfish reasons, wanting to tap their raw power. The "animals" posses and destroy human beings as they invade the town, and also start to destroy houses, telephone poles and the very ground itself, threatening a veritable apocalypse. Some of the people overtaken by the supernatural beings are "the usual suspects". Thus, a certain Foster, who has always craved power, gets precisely what he wants, being possessed by the heavenly archetype of a lion.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By C. Van Zonneveld on 16 Nov. 2009
Format: Paperback
I have the idea that I'm dreaming....nothing is real anymore except the real truth. Absolutely stunning book. Makes you look out for God's reality because that's the only thing that finally counts, whatever we see, think, smell and hear - shocking when we loose that, but do not worry, God's reality is there. Yes read it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful By T. Hooper on 29 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
I have no reeal idea what this is all about but such is the power of the prose and imagery, that doesn't matter. It's weird but 'good' weird.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback