The Pity of it All: A Portrait of Jews in Germany 1743-1933 and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £12.99
  • You Save: £0.91 (7%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Pity of it All: A Por... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping option on this book. Guaranteed very good quality. Used but still in excellent condition for the next owner.
Trade in your item
Get a £1.54
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Pity of it All: A Portrait of Jews in Germany 1743-1933 Paperback – 12 Jan 2004


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£8.79
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.08
£5.27 £2.13

Frequently Bought Together

The Pity of it All: A Portrait of Jews in Germany 1743-1933 + The Jew in the Modern World: A Documentary History
Price For Both: £47.07

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £1.54
Trade in The Pity of it All: A Portrait of Jews in Germany 1743-1933 for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £1.54, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; New Ed edition (12 Jan. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140283943
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140283945
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 395,281 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Brilliant, far-reaching, passionate. . .sweeping and marvelously detailed. . .finely, intimately, movingly drawn. . . a book for the ages." --"The New York Times" "[Elon] is a master of the telling anecdote. . ..One should be grateful for what Elon has done." --"Los Angeles Times" "A work packed with beautifully sketched portraits, and constructed with a practiced eye for memorable, well-executed anecdotes." --"The New York Times Book Review" "Impressive. . .Could hardly be improved upon." --"The New York Review of Books" "If there is one book Americans should read this winter, it is Amos Elon's "The Pity of It All--"a meticulous and wrenching history of a people in a place at a moment in time that bears urgently upon our own." --Joan Didion, author of "Political Fictions"

About the Author

Amos Elon is the author of eight widely praised books, including A Blood-Dimmed Tide, Founder: A Portrait of the First Rothschild and the New York Times bestseller Israelis: Founders and Sons. A frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine and the New York Review of Books, he divides his time between Jerusalem and Tuscany.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By an amateur fan on 1 Feb. 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A highly accomplished & engaging examination of Jews & Germany: a weird love affair that always seems to go wrong. Riveting in parts - the reader is undoubtedly transfixed because of his / her knowledge of the dreadful events Jewish love of Germany was leading to. One gripe: the author is so carried away with the tale of jewish assimilation that he gives no attention whatsoever to the renaissance of Jewish orthodoxy in Germany in the latter part of the 19th century (there is no mention at for instance of notable Rabbi, S R Hirsch).
The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews in Germany 1743-1933The Pity of It All: A Portrait of Jews in Germany 1743-1933
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By oldhasbeen VINE VOICE on 16 Nov. 2007
Format: Paperback
Amos Elon takes on a very large subject, charting the history of Jews in Germany over several hundred years. He successfully combines the big picture, showing the vicissitudes of the German-Jewish experience over the centuries, with mini-biographies of some of the most prominent German Jews, including several composers (Mendelsson, Offenbach, Mahler), Scientists (e.g. Fritz Harber & Einstein), mainstream politicians (notably Walter Rathaus, a key figure in WW1), literary figures (e.g. Heinrich Heine), revolutionaries (Marx, Rosa Luxemburg etc) and many more. It's a very colourful tapestry and very illuminating as well, demolishing quite a few myths on the way.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
excellent history book telling the incredible story of the Jews in Germany, their unique contribution to sciences, literature, arts, music, economy and politics - reaching its peak at the beginning of the twentieth century. The pity of it all: the Jews profoundly loved their homeland which, in return, exterminated them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By andrew smith on 17 Dec. 2004
Format: Hardcover
Taking beginning of modern German-Jewish history with Moses Mendelssohn, this treatment of the Jewish frustration with German history is a concise and informative view of the difficult, arms- length relationship between Germany and her citizens of the Jewish faith. Having made clear to them that Jews were not regarded as Germans, the story is thus one of those "outside" trying their best to gain addmission. German society was in response, resistant and then a certain governmnet undertook a plan to expell them for good. Poignantly, the book ends with the escape from Berlin of Hannah Arendt, taking exactly the same route that Mendelsohn took all those years before.
Strong on individual details, Mr Elon shows his weaknesses within his strengths; what we are given is little more than a string of (very good) biographies played out against the backcloth of German histroy, but sadly, he makes little attempt to interweave the two. Thus we rattle from Heinrich Heine and 1848 through to Walther Rathenau and modernity, without appreaciating how exactly Germany changed within theis period, and how anti-semitism altered from a social prejudice to a would-be scientific race theory. Although we are treated to a brief summary of the change from Treitschke to count Gobineau, without a real consideration of the quauzi- darwinian notion of race theory, the mid-twentieth century attempt to exclude Jews from the German cultural sphere can not be understood fully. Jews were tolerated earlier, because even out of the ghetto, they could be ostracised. After Gobineau, it was seen that the "Jewish race" (Judaism was seen no longer as a religion) would, unless removed, somehow "undermine" "ayrian Germany." Thus expulsion, culminating in murder, was for the racialists, a necessity.
In the light of this, the collection of biogrpahies, whilst informative, and often enlightening, does not really explain a great deal.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback