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The Pirate's Dilemma: How Hackers, Punk Capitalists, Graffiti Millionaires and Other Youth Movements are Remixing Our Culture and Changing Our World Paperback – 1 May 2008

4 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (1 May 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846141206
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846141201
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2.7 x 23.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 823,175 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Pirates bring choice and cause change. In this stunning book, Matt Mason forgets the parrots and the eye patches, but manages to teach us all a great deal. I learned a lot (Seth Godin, Author Of The Business Bestseller Purple Cow )

Scotland on Sunday

Importantly accessible ... [Has] insights that align him with the most sophisticated of academics in a style anyone can read

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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book, and some very interesting arguments on how art and music has changed due to the 'pirates' the bad people. When really they have helped industries find other ways to sell and earn from the creations.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very interesting book - thoroughly enjoying it. It has been startlingly insightful.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is something of a spate of these kinds of books recently, trying to argue up the impact of technology on culture and business, and how this is going to change human nature. Mason avoids this problem by pointing out the Internet is simply giving another context for human nature to play itself out, the conservative forces of respectability in battle with the pirate rebels who in turn ultimately become the Establishment and so on. It effects culture and the business of culture for sure, but only as they reflect existing models of conducting both of those activities. At times it becomes hard to believe there was any music before the recording industry, or any music business before the advent of the record label...

Mason puts his case energetically and with some interesting stories, but very little evidence other than a preoccupation with pop culture in general and hip-hop in particular. He is also prone to using incommensurable intellectual paradigms to flesh out his arguments: computer science is not genetics, but Mason wants us to read it in this way as a means of deepening the implications of an argument about the impact of digital technology on culture. They just aren't the same thing, and attempts to over-dramatize the situation look like arm-waving, despite the seriousness of the attempt to assert the value of the Pirates for everyone, especially those dependent on existing business models.

The interesting thing about books like this is that it reflects the fact that, as a culture, we are thinking about these issues very seriously now. The worst thing about them is they suggest the answers are already there, and this is patently not the case.
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