The Pierces

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At a Glance

Formed: 2000 (14 years ago)


Biography

Drop the needle anywhere on The Pierces' fifth album Creation, and it's impossible to miss the sense of renewed possibility that pervades every note. "If we want to/We could do what kings do," sing Allison and Catherine Pierce on Kings, a cascading declaration of love's supremacy over its opposite. As an industrially adhesive chorus goes about its business, the sisters' vocals reveal new colours with every subsequent listen. Whatever else is open to conjecture, one thing is certain. They haven't been idle.

Far from it, in fact. As with its gold-selling, top five predecessor You ... Read more

Drop the needle anywhere on The Pierces' fifth album Creation, and it's impossible to miss the sense of renewed possibility that pervades every note. "If we want to/We could do what kings do," sing Allison and Catherine Pierce on Kings, a cascading declaration of love's supremacy over its opposite. As an industrially adhesive chorus goes about its business, the sisters' vocals reveal new colours with every subsequent listen. Whatever else is open to conjecture, one thing is certain. They haven't been idle.

Far from it, in fact. As with its gold-selling, top five predecessor You & I, again, Creation sees the sisters' exquisitely intertwined voices continue to sit square at the centre of standouts such as Confidence In Love and the album's eponymous opener. Elsewhere, highlights such as The One I Want and Must Be Something conjure hooks out of heartache with a yearning languor that recalls Stevie Nicks and the young Heart. And because this is The Pierces', nary a minute or two goes by without falling prey to the sweetest deception: the apparent deja vu that comes from hearing all great pop music.

It's all light years away from the circumstances that brought their breakthrough album You And I into bring. Lest we forget, You & I was the album which finally put some distance between The Pierces and ten years of false starts. Buoyed by a succession of folk-flecked radio hits such as It Will Not Be Forgotten and Glorious, You & I finally made pop stars of The Pierces, landing into the UK charts at number four and paving the way for a summer of acclaimed festival appearances.

As they commenced an extended stay in the UK Top 20, Allison and Catherine set about establishing some sort of equilibrium between their professional and personal lives. For the older, dark-haired Allison, success came at a price. Shuttling between her adopted hometown of London and New York, she realised that something had to give. Living an itinerant life was nothing new - as children, the sisters were home-schooled by parents in Alabama who "were constantly moving around" - but new music was struggling to find an outlet. "I can't write if I know there's someone in the building listening in," says Allison, "The music only seems to come with solitude."

Allison decamped to the States - in the process, coming to terms with the break-up of her relationship. With her sister now also relocated in Los Angeles, she found a place nearby. For Catherine though, the travails of previous romances were swiftly being superceded by the current events of her life: the thrill of a new relationship with guitarist Christian "Leggy" Langdon, who also happened to be the group's on-tour musical director. Having "done time in dysfunctional relationships" - a process chronicled in the achingly beautiful Must Be Something - Catherine embarked on a period of self-discovery that would prompt the most concentrated creative outpouring of her life.

Los Angeles brought with it opportunities that almost certainly wouldn't have presented themselves in anywhere else in the western world. A friend of the sisters told them about Ayahuasca - a hallucinogenic compound used under shamanic supervision in Amazonian Peru, used to help bring about profound positive changes in the lives of those taking it. "I had no idea what I was getting into," says Allison - the first of the sisters to try it. "You sit on a yoga mat and it's a completely internal experience. So you are not communicating with anyone. It's all happening inside of you. You see these really beautiful colours and shapes and geometric patterns. And then, it starts to reveal things about yourself to you. You can go in with a question and say, 'I want to understand this more' and, weird as it sounds, you will be shown. I saw some of my deepest fears. You're given these gifts, these insights and then you work through them."

Given new-found solitude to work through those fears, Allison found that finally, the music began to surge outwards. Spidering out from a few idly strummed chords, Monsters evolved into something truly exceptional: a brooding address to the misfortunes we make and the misfortunes that ultimately make us. Elements is no less affecting - an achingly weary song for the silence that fills the vacuum where love once flourished. Latticed by some inspired harmonising, the insistently plaintive I Can Feel stands shoulder to shoulder with some of the most beautiful music to bear The Pierces' imprint.

Meanwhile, Catherine dramatically hit her stride with a flurry of assured compositions. Having witnessed the positive changes in Allison brought about by Ayahuasca, Catherine felt compelled to undergo the same process. So epiphanic was her experience that she went to Peru and embarked on a week-long Ayahuasca retreat. The first and perhaps most dramatic effect on her songwriting was the album's rhapsodic title track - a line firmly drawn in the sand between past adversities and bold new beginnings. "I'd come to a point in my life where a lot of my older songs were about heartache and struggle. Creation was really just a reminder to myself that the ability to exorcise those demons rests firmly within me. It's a song of empowerment."

Enthused by the possibilities of writing and producing songs on her iPad, Catherine found that new methods opened up new sonic vistas. Cases in point included the arpeggiating dance-pop of The Devil is A Lonely Night and also Confidence In Love. Recalling the circumstances in which brought the latter into being, Allison reveals how close The Pierces were to undoing all the good fortune they had created for themselves with You & I. "The first few weeks in the studio were tough," she recalls, "We spent most of our budget working with a successful L.A. producer. But the resulting recordings simply didn't sound like us. The chemistry was missing and most of the money had run out."

Having produced the b-sides that came with the singles from You & I, Christian Langdon raised a willing hand. Appropriately one of the songs he produced on a "trial" basis was Confidence In Love - a pledge of devotion written for him from Catherine. "We all go through phases where, for whatever reason, our self-esteem takes a battering. That song was really just my attempt to give back to him some of the wonderful things he had given to me." And when the record company heard what he had done with the songs, they were thrilled. So he went on to produce the whole thing." She lets forth a slightly embarrassed laugh. "Does that sound corny?"

Well possibly, but then we also know that sentiments that sometimes sound corny on paper undergo the strangest magic when fed into the almost psychically attuned interior world of Allison and Catherine Pierce. These are love songs performed by idealists who remain nonetheless aware of all evidence to the contrary. Declarations of faith in a faithless world. And why not? The Pierces' belief in happy endings has been vindicated by their most consummate album to date.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Drop the needle anywhere on The Pierces' fifth album Creation, and it's impossible to miss the sense of renewed possibility that pervades every note. "If we want to/We could do what kings do," sing Allison and Catherine Pierce on Kings, a cascading declaration of love's supremacy over its opposite. As an industrially adhesive chorus goes about its business, the sisters' vocals reveal new colours with every subsequent listen. Whatever else is open to conjecture, one thing is certain. They haven't been idle.

Far from it, in fact. As with its gold-selling, top five predecessor You & I, again, Creation sees the sisters' exquisitely intertwined voices continue to sit square at the centre of standouts such as Confidence In Love and the album's eponymous opener. Elsewhere, highlights such as The One I Want and Must Be Something conjure hooks out of heartache with a yearning languor that recalls Stevie Nicks and the young Heart. And because this is The Pierces', nary a minute or two goes by without falling prey to the sweetest deception: the apparent deja vu that comes from hearing all great pop music.

It's all light years away from the circumstances that brought their breakthrough album You And I into bring. Lest we forget, You & I was the album which finally put some distance between The Pierces and ten years of false starts. Buoyed by a succession of folk-flecked radio hits such as It Will Not Be Forgotten and Glorious, You & I finally made pop stars of The Pierces, landing into the UK charts at number four and paving the way for a summer of acclaimed festival appearances.

As they commenced an extended stay in the UK Top 20, Allison and Catherine set about establishing some sort of equilibrium between their professional and personal lives. For the older, dark-haired Allison, success came at a price. Shuttling between her adopted hometown of London and New York, she realised that something had to give. Living an itinerant life was nothing new - as children, the sisters were home-schooled by parents in Alabama who "were constantly moving around" - but new music was struggling to find an outlet. "I can't write if I know there's someone in the building listening in," says Allison, "The music only seems to come with solitude."

Allison decamped to the States - in the process, coming to terms with the break-up of her relationship. With her sister now also relocated in Los Angeles, she found a place nearby. For Catherine though, the travails of previous romances were swiftly being superceded by the current events of her life: the thrill of a new relationship with guitarist Christian "Leggy" Langdon, who also happened to be the group's on-tour musical director. Having "done time in dysfunctional relationships" - a process chronicled in the achingly beautiful Must Be Something - Catherine embarked on a period of self-discovery that would prompt the most concentrated creative outpouring of her life.

Los Angeles brought with it opportunities that almost certainly wouldn't have presented themselves in anywhere else in the western world. A friend of the sisters told them about Ayahuasca - a hallucinogenic compound used under shamanic supervision in Amazonian Peru, used to help bring about profound positive changes in the lives of those taking it. "I had no idea what I was getting into," says Allison - the first of the sisters to try it. "You sit on a yoga mat and it's a completely internal experience. So you are not communicating with anyone. It's all happening inside of you. You see these really beautiful colours and shapes and geometric patterns. And then, it starts to reveal things about yourself to you. You can go in with a question and say, 'I want to understand this more' and, weird as it sounds, you will be shown. I saw some of my deepest fears. You're given these gifts, these insights and then you work through them."

Given new-found solitude to work through those fears, Allison found that finally, the music began to surge outwards. Spidering out from a few idly strummed chords, Monsters evolved into something truly exceptional: a brooding address to the misfortunes we make and the misfortunes that ultimately make us. Elements is no less affecting - an achingly weary song for the silence that fills the vacuum where love once flourished. Latticed by some inspired harmonising, the insistently plaintive I Can Feel stands shoulder to shoulder with some of the most beautiful music to bear The Pierces' imprint.

Meanwhile, Catherine dramatically hit her stride with a flurry of assured compositions. Having witnessed the positive changes in Allison brought about by Ayahuasca, Catherine felt compelled to undergo the same process. So epiphanic was her experience that she went to Peru and embarked on a week-long Ayahuasca retreat. The first and perhaps most dramatic effect on her songwriting was the album's rhapsodic title track - a line firmly drawn in the sand between past adversities and bold new beginnings. "I'd come to a point in my life where a lot of my older songs were about heartache and struggle. Creation was really just a reminder to myself that the ability to exorcise those demons rests firmly within me. It's a song of empowerment."

Enthused by the possibilities of writing and producing songs on her iPad, Catherine found that new methods opened up new sonic vistas. Cases in point included the arpeggiating dance-pop of The Devil is A Lonely Night and also Confidence In Love. Recalling the circumstances in which brought the latter into being, Allison reveals how close The Pierces were to undoing all the good fortune they had created for themselves with You & I. "The first few weeks in the studio were tough," she recalls, "We spent most of our budget working with a successful L.A. producer. But the resulting recordings simply didn't sound like us. The chemistry was missing and most of the money had run out."

Having produced the b-sides that came with the singles from You & I, Christian Langdon raised a willing hand. Appropriately one of the songs he produced on a "trial" basis was Confidence In Love - a pledge of devotion written for him from Catherine. "We all go through phases where, for whatever reason, our self-esteem takes a battering. That song was really just my attempt to give back to him some of the wonderful things he had given to me." And when the record company heard what he had done with the songs, they were thrilled. So he went on to produce the whole thing." She lets forth a slightly embarrassed laugh. "Does that sound corny?"

Well possibly, but then we also know that sentiments that sometimes sound corny on paper undergo the strangest magic when fed into the almost psychically attuned interior world of Allison and Catherine Pierce. These are love songs performed by idealists who remain nonetheless aware of all evidence to the contrary. Declarations of faith in a faithless world. And why not? The Pierces' belief in happy endings has been vindicated by their most consummate album to date.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Drop the needle anywhere on The Pierces' fifth album Creation, and it's impossible to miss the sense of renewed possibility that pervades every note. "If we want to/We could do what kings do," sing Allison and Catherine Pierce on Kings, a cascading declaration of love's supremacy over its opposite. As an industrially adhesive chorus goes about its business, the sisters' vocals reveal new colours with every subsequent listen. Whatever else is open to conjecture, one thing is certain. They haven't been idle.

Far from it, in fact. As with its gold-selling, top five predecessor You & I, again, Creation sees the sisters' exquisitely intertwined voices continue to sit square at the centre of standouts such as Confidence In Love and the album's eponymous opener. Elsewhere, highlights such as The One I Want and Must Be Something conjure hooks out of heartache with a yearning languor that recalls Stevie Nicks and the young Heart. And because this is The Pierces', nary a minute or two goes by without falling prey to the sweetest deception: the apparent deja vu that comes from hearing all great pop music.

It's all light years away from the circumstances that brought their breakthrough album You And I into bring. Lest we forget, You & I was the album which finally put some distance between The Pierces and ten years of false starts. Buoyed by a succession of folk-flecked radio hits such as It Will Not Be Forgotten and Glorious, You & I finally made pop stars of The Pierces, landing into the UK charts at number four and paving the way for a summer of acclaimed festival appearances.

As they commenced an extended stay in the UK Top 20, Allison and Catherine set about establishing some sort of equilibrium between their professional and personal lives. For the older, dark-haired Allison, success came at a price. Shuttling between her adopted hometown of London and New York, she realised that something had to give. Living an itinerant life was nothing new - as children, the sisters were home-schooled by parents in Alabama who "were constantly moving around" - but new music was struggling to find an outlet. "I can't write if I know there's someone in the building listening in," says Allison, "The music only seems to come with solitude."

Allison decamped to the States - in the process, coming to terms with the break-up of her relationship. With her sister now also relocated in Los Angeles, she found a place nearby. For Catherine though, the travails of previous romances were swiftly being superceded by the current events of her life: the thrill of a new relationship with guitarist Christian "Leggy" Langdon, who also happened to be the group's on-tour musical director. Having "done time in dysfunctional relationships" - a process chronicled in the achingly beautiful Must Be Something - Catherine embarked on a period of self-discovery that would prompt the most concentrated creative outpouring of her life.

Los Angeles brought with it opportunities that almost certainly wouldn't have presented themselves in anywhere else in the western world. A friend of the sisters told them about Ayahuasca - a hallucinogenic compound used under shamanic supervision in Amazonian Peru, used to help bring about profound positive changes in the lives of those taking it. "I had no idea what I was getting into," says Allison - the first of the sisters to try it. "You sit on a yoga mat and it's a completely internal experience. So you are not communicating with anyone. It's all happening inside of you. You see these really beautiful colours and shapes and geometric patterns. And then, it starts to reveal things about yourself to you. You can go in with a question and say, 'I want to understand this more' and, weird as it sounds, you will be shown. I saw some of my deepest fears. You're given these gifts, these insights and then you work through them."

Given new-found solitude to work through those fears, Allison found that finally, the music began to surge outwards. Spidering out from a few idly strummed chords, Monsters evolved into something truly exceptional: a brooding address to the misfortunes we make and the misfortunes that ultimately make us. Elements is no less affecting - an achingly weary song for the silence that fills the vacuum where love once flourished. Latticed by some inspired harmonising, the insistently plaintive I Can Feel stands shoulder to shoulder with some of the most beautiful music to bear The Pierces' imprint.

Meanwhile, Catherine dramatically hit her stride with a flurry of assured compositions. Having witnessed the positive changes in Allison brought about by Ayahuasca, Catherine felt compelled to undergo the same process. So epiphanic was her experience that she went to Peru and embarked on a week-long Ayahuasca retreat. The first and perhaps most dramatic effect on her songwriting was the album's rhapsodic title track - a line firmly drawn in the sand between past adversities and bold new beginnings. "I'd come to a point in my life where a lot of my older songs were about heartache and struggle. Creation was really just a reminder to myself that the ability to exorcise those demons rests firmly within me. It's a song of empowerment."

Enthused by the possibilities of writing and producing songs on her iPad, Catherine found that new methods opened up new sonic vistas. Cases in point included the arpeggiating dance-pop of The Devil is A Lonely Night and also Confidence In Love. Recalling the circumstances in which brought the latter into being, Allison reveals how close The Pierces were to undoing all the good fortune they had created for themselves with You & I. "The first few weeks in the studio were tough," she recalls, "We spent most of our budget working with a successful L.A. producer. But the resulting recordings simply didn't sound like us. The chemistry was missing and most of the money had run out."

Having produced the b-sides that came with the singles from You & I, Christian Langdon raised a willing hand. Appropriately one of the songs he produced on a "trial" basis was Confidence In Love - a pledge of devotion written for him from Catherine. "We all go through phases where, for whatever reason, our self-esteem takes a battering. That song was really just my attempt to give back to him some of the wonderful things he had given to me." And when the record company heard what he had done with the songs, they were thrilled. So he went on to produce the whole thing." She lets forth a slightly embarrassed laugh. "Does that sound corny?"

Well possibly, but then we also know that sentiments that sometimes sound corny on paper undergo the strangest magic when fed into the almost psychically attuned interior world of Allison and Catherine Pierce. These are love songs performed by idealists who remain nonetheless aware of all evidence to the contrary. Declarations of faith in a faithless world. And why not? The Pierces' belief in happy endings has been vindicated by their most consummate album to date.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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