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The Physics of Golf Paperback – 1 Apr 1999

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Product details

  • Paperback: 204 pages
  • Publisher: Springer; 2 edition (1 April 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 038798691X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0387986913
  • Product Dimensions: 15.5 x 1.2 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 328,643 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

From the reviews:

"… Gives new insights and precise views into the forces and torques developed in the downswing.... Thank you, Dr. Jorgensen...We will all treasure your book." American Golf Pro

"The heart of golfer Ted Jorgensen's delightful book lies in his analysis of the swing of the golf club and how, armed with insights from that analysis, you, he and I might all swing the club better and play better golf . . . [The book] is designed to be accessible to the casual reader while satisfying the critical student. But first word or last, for anyone who has swung a golf club, the book is fun to read." Physics Today (BOB ADAIR, AUTHOR OF PHYSICS OF BASEBALL)

From the Publisher

Great reviews!
This best-selling title is now in its third printing. Golfers and physicists alike will find something instructional and enjoyable. "For anyone who has swung a golf club, the book is fun to read." --Robert Adair, author of The Physics of Baseball "Jorgensen tells golfers what they ought to be doing and why, the correct techniques according to the principles of physics." --Golf Weekly --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book

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First Sentence
Golf, with its intense frustrations, bitter disappointments, sturdy enjoyments, and, yes, extreme ecstasies, would not be the game it is without the continual dream to do better the next time around. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Nov. 1998
Format: Paperback
Great book! I have read everything out there and have tried to incorporate the writings of many teachers. Dr. Jorgensen, although a well-regarded physicist, writes like he prefers to be on the golf course. I find his theory, and practical implementation of the golf swing the best around.I wish he would write on the short game, putting, ect.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 Dec. 1998
Format: Paperback
Only get this book if you love physics and want to analyze in detail mathematical models of golf swings and ball flight. This book is written by a physicist, and it shows. The author does an admirable job of analyzing the golf swing, but spends so much time describing how he built his models that the "so what" gets lost in the details. If you're looking to improve your golf game, other books will get you there with much less pain. For example Dave Pelz is also a physicist, and his book, "Putt Like the Pros" has very readable analyses and offers valuable and practical advice.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Samuel Halliday on 8 Jun. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Poorly written, full of egocentric boasting and anecdotal stories with real names hidden. It feels like the author spent a day writing a golf swing model in MATLAB and converted it into a wordy chapter, padding it out into a book by adding a few more chapters that don't really have a purpose or conclusion. Scientifically-minded golfers will find Wesson's "Science of Golf" a much better read.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 31 reviews
22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
Just needs decent graphics and illustrations 25 May 2000
By joe_n_bloe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I enthusiastically recommend this book to golfers with an interest in science/math/engineering, or scientists/mathematicians/engineers with an interest in golf. You should get Search for the Perfect Swing first. But once you have that out of the way, this book is an excellent addition to a golf library.
The biggest shortcomings of The Physics of Golf are (1) a lack of quality illustrations/pictures/graphics and (2) a rather terse treatment of the material. I feel that the author probably has enough research to go on for 4-500 pages but called it quits at a much more concise size. I'm all for concise, but not when it leaves me feeling some useful material was left out.
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
The best insight into the golf swing I've ever read 25 Mar. 1999
By csindelman@investec.co.za - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The book's major contribution is that it distinguishes clearly between style and fundamentals. It focuses the reader's attention on the downswing and demonstrates the simple moves required to ensure club head acceleration through to impact. By showing how these moves differ when the shaft is above and below the horizontal and how certain other moves destroy club head acceleration in these positions the reader will probably for the first time come away with the true fundamental moves in a golf swing. The most insightful book on golf I've ever read. If you can't handle equations read the chapters for the less mathematically gifted - all the gems are still there.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
It reads more like a physics thesis than a golf book. 29 Dec. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Only get this book if you love physics and want to analyze in detail mathematical models of golf swings and ball flight. This book is written by a physicist, and it shows. The author does an admirable job of analyzing the golf swing, but spends so much time describing how he built his models that the "so what" gets lost in the details. If you're looking to improve your golf game, other books will get you there with much less pain. For example Dave Pelz is also a physicist, and his book, "Putt Like the Pros" has very readable analyses and offers valuable and practical advice.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
simple, precise, effective 30 Nov. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Great book! I have read everything out there and have tried to incorporate the writings of many teachers. Dr. Jorgensen, although a well-regarded physicist, writes like he prefers to be on the golf course. I find his theory, and practical implementation of the golf swing the best around.I wish he would write on the short game, putting, ect.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Golf Physics for Lab Rats 3 Dec. 2011
By guru4u - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is my desire to be nice with these reviews, but this book needs some major work. On p. 6 is the stroboscopic photo from which all the data are collected. It would be helpful if the light traces were labeled and explained more clearly. There appears to be tape at both the bottom of the handle and the end of the club. This little 12" is really critical and deserves better analysis. After all, the handle of the club is your only point of control over the clubhead. Then there are all those extraneous light traces for the elbows and who knows what else. Bottom line, the book is out of date relative to modern video and computer equipment. FYI, many years ago, my grad school mentor, the great University of Houston golf coach and mathematics professor, Dave Williams, published a similar analysis.

There are some obvious errors, at least to a kinesiologist. The major part of the analysis concerns the dynamics of the angle formed between the left forearm and the shaft. Figure 2.3, on page 9 and the supporting data tables in the appendix, show an angle that cannot exist in a normal human. The Scaphoid bone in the wrist limits the angle between the club and the forearm to no more than 90 degrees. This analysis if flawed. The reporting of this too large angle is a result of optical delusion existing between a 2D image and a 3D golf swing. This makes you wonder about the affect on the math.

The second major problem is the use of a two lever model to describe a two sided human swing motion. While it is true the right side does not act as a large power source (more of a stabilizer), none the less gravity and a small amount of muscle does contribute to he movement of the club. The muscles that add force are not in the arms. They are in the chest. I see not mention of the force coupling between the top hand and the bottom hand. As the end of the handle slows it's forward motion just prior to impact, the bottom hand continues to move forward. While, timing the swing so this "whipping" action increases clubhead speed, is difficult, it is not impossible. What may be needed is a better teaching model based on something closer to a seven lever model which more accurately describes what the human body is doing to the club.

As a compliment to the book, Dr. Jorgensen does correctly describe the kinetic link/summation of segmental velocities which
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