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The Tao of Physics (Flamingo) Paperback – 20 Feb 1992


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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Flamingo; 3Rev Ed edition (20 Feb. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0006544894
  • ISBN-13: 978-0006544890
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 14,697 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"A brilliant best seller. . . . Lucidly analyzes the tenets of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism to show their striking parallels with the latest discovery in cyclotrons."--"New York" magazine "A pioneering book of real value and wide appeal."--"Washington Post""I have been reading the book with amazement and the greatest interest, recommending it to everyone I meet and, as often as possible, in my lectures. I think you have done a magnificent and extremely important job."--"Joseph Campbell"

From the Back Cover

'The Tao of Physics' is Fritjof Capra's classic exploration of the connections between Eastern mysticism and modern physics. An international bestseller, the book's central thesis, that the mystical traditions of the East constitute a coherent philosophical framework within which the most advanced Western theories of the physical world can be accommodated, has not only withstood the test of time but is ever more emphatically endoresed by ongoing experimentation and research.

Fritjof Capra addresses recent scientific developments in this, the third edition, in the form of a chapter-length afterword on 'The Future of the New Physics'.

'The parallels are indeed most striking'
SIR BERNARD LOVELL

'In the role of interpreter of the 'philosophy' of physics today, Dr Capra has few equals'
JOHN GRIBBIN, 'TES'


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By David Langley on 7 July 2006
Format: Paperback
Quote from book - "I also hope to find among my readers many physicists with an interest in the philosophical aspects of physics, who have not come in contact with the religious philosophies of the East. They will find that Eastern Mysticism provides a consistent and beautiful philosophical framework which can accommodate our most advanced theories of the physical world"

Originally published in 1975 this book was the first of its kind, and its findings still apply some thirty years later.

Fritjof explores eastern mysticism in the from of Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese thought, Taoism and Zen, with devoting many pages to introduce them and provides the reader with a good insight into these religions.

Fritjof does not inject much humour into his work, but does have quite an interesting take on discoveries in that discoveries, most often come to people in an almost daydreaming state, as did this book come into being. His writing is clear and at times concise, at others, elaboration on the subject is very well included and there is little in this book to get bored with.

What Fritjof does is take excerpts from the different schools of thought and shows how this correlates with scientific findings of the 20th century; he does this with ease and grace. The main thing to be taken away from this book is the idea that some of those things were written 1000's of years ago, and science has been playing `catch up' with the mystics. Definitely worth reading if you like science or not, but more so if you like science.
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70 of 72 people found the following review helpful By "kotashivaranjan" on 22 Oct. 1999
Format: Paperback
This is the book which is said to have turned the philosophy of scientific endeavours in academic communities on both sides of the Atlantic on its head. It is easy to see why. The first edition of this book appeared in 1975 - Quantum physics and Relativity theory were beginning to make more sense than earlier and finding favour with more and more young minds round that time. To be jolted with the idea of this "modern" science paralleling Eastern thought and mysticism was bound to have an impact. Coming from the East myself and being fortunate enough to have studied Quantum physics and Relativity at college, I went through this book with an extremely fine toothcomb. And couldn't fault it - except for some easily pardonable pacifist statements. I wouldn't recommend this book if you want to learn more about QP - read Feynman's lectures if you want to do that. But if you want to find out more about what Eastern thought is and how religion and philosophy there tie in with modern science and the consequent "organic" world view - you would want to take a look at this book.
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49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By "mileskemp" on 20 May 2002
Format: Paperback
In this book Capra manages to encapsulate the true nature of existence. No mean feat. In an inspired act of synthesis, he demonstrates that both modern Western science and traditional Eastern spirituality reveal the same core truth: that the universe is one interconnected whole, a ceaseless flux of living energy of which we are all part.
What is more, he argues his case with clarity, conciseness and a total lack of spiritual mumbo-jumbo.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By conjunction on 9 Feb. 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When I was a boy, aged about 8, I used to lie awake at night worrying about how the universe could possibly have been created out of nothing. I wouldn't say Capra has made me feel alright, but I have certainly reduced my consumption of valium.

To get serious I am not at all a physicist, but have a longstanding interest in mysticism. For me this book went quite a long way towards explaining modern physics. I am amazed how 'far out' it gets - Capra starts by taking us through relativity and quantum theory - explaining that electrons can be seen as particles or waves but not both, it depends how you set up the experiment. He winds up with Geoffrey Chew and Bohr suggesting that matter of any description can ultimately only be understood as to some degree a function of the mind.

Along the way he drops in elegant and pithy summaries of the philosophy of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucius and the Tao, drawing parallels between physics and the eastern view of the universe as a creation of the mind.

Having said this, to my mind, untutored (completely) as it is in physics or for that matter science in general, Capra presents a lot of ideas, admittedly in coherent form, without fully explaining them. Therefore, if this book whets your appetite to understand physics properly you are maybe going to have to go somewhere else.

But for its stated purpose, to express and point up links between mysticism and physics, you can't go wrong.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "mileskemp" on 20 May 2002
Format: Paperback
In this book Capra manages to encapsulate the true nature of existence. No mean feat. In an inspired act of synthesis, he demonstrates that both modern Western science and traditional Eastern spirituality share the same core truth: that the universe is one interconnected whole, a ceaseless flux of living energy of which we are all part.
What is more, he argues his case with clarity, conciseness and a total lack of spiritual mumbo-jumbo.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By inch worm on 30 Nov. 2009
Format: Paperback
Find out in this book just how it is that the great eastern religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism have been revealing the quantum physics throughout the centuries. When I first read this groundbreaking book of Capra's in the 1980's I was ignorant of the Buddha's deep insights into the quantum field as well as profoundly ignorant of the struggle the science of physics had been having to find a language that could get beyond the paradoxes that were being discovered within the microcosm.

It was through Capra's revelations that I subsequently launched into years of study regarding Buddha's teaching as well as particle physics and quantum healing. I guess it could also be true that Capra was instumental in making the West wake-up to the fact that the above mentioned religions were far ahead of the west in both medicine and psychology, centuries before Hippocrates or Freud, who still is dubbed the grandfather of psychology. When are we going to wake up to ourselves?

I still return to The Tao of Physics from time to time and I give you this quote;
We have favoured self-assertion over integration, analysis over synthesis, rational knowledge over intuitive wisdom, science over religion, competition over cooperation, expansion over conservation, and so on. This one-sided development has now reached a highly alarming stage; a crisis of social, ecological, moral, and spiritual dimensions.

Rings even louder alarm bells today than when it was written!!!!!!!
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