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The Philosophy of Punk: More Than Noise!! Paperback – 18 Dec 1999

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Product details

  • Paperback: 171 pages
  • Publisher: AK Press; 2nd Revised edition edition (18 Dec. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1873176163
  • ISBN-13: 978-1873176160
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 0.8 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 502,627 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

As the subculture of punk experiences its twentieth anniversary, a fairly clear set of ideas (both revolutionary and reactionary) have emerged. This is the first book to give an inside look at the thriving culture as an important present day movement, and as a way of life. Covering topics such as the media's (mis)representation of punk, skinheads, fanzines, anarchism, homosexuality, and environmentalism. Includes over 70 photos taken by the author over the last decade.

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3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Charles E. Lynch on 21 Jun. 2009
Format: Paperback
My first thought on reading this book is it's somewhat hit and miss quality, that makes me wonder where the author is now and will they ever do a revised edition? It was written some time ago and would perhaps benefit from updating to take into account developments since. It is a brave, trailblazing but often seriously flawed work, which depends heavily on selective evidence- for example large areas are referanced to various North American Zines, while not embracing wider research. Another annoyance is the use of the Harvard referancing system, which in my opinion clutters up the text unessesarily. I also think it should have been sent for wider review than Maximum Rock and Roll, a publication that looms large over the whole book.

Despite these problems the book is a brave effort and we need more of these works in a time when Punk culture seems to be increasingly sidelined and neglected.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 May 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is guilty of being extremely selective with it's facts. The author has a tendency to promote his view of the punk and hardcore scene whilst overlooking evidence to the contrary. Although this book does have a good grounding in punk history I wouldn't recomend it to newcomers to the scene because of the one-sided account it offers. People who already know about punk might just find the authors attitudes mildly irritating (check out his back-slapping attitude to anarcho-punk but complete misrepresentation of other areas of the scene). Good pics though.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By abclaret on 24 April 2011
Format: Paperback
Does exactly what it sets out to do; examining in detail some of the punk subcultures, such as, anarcho-punk, queer-core, straight-edge etc.. Gives you an exhaustive list of bands for you to wet your appetite, communicates the feel part of the scene tries to convey and gives the Oi! and straight-edge scene a much needed critique.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By BiafronPunk on 27 May 2008
Format: Paperback
This is not your typical punk rock book. There's an endless amount of books covering the history of punk, almost always ending before the 80's. This is not one of them. This is about punk as a continuing subculture. There are also tonnes of books about the music and the bands. This is not one of them either. This is specifically about the most significant social and political philosophies that punk has grown to represent (when it's not clowning around doing songs about masturbation).This is not a book to get if you're going to complain that your favourite band isn't in it. Any bands that are mentioned are done so to back up a specific point, nothing more as this book is not about them but about the scene of which they are just one part.

This is a book that is likely to divide readers and as such it should be a must-read for any punk rockers. Whether you agree with it or not it will give you something to shout about. The fact remains that there are no other books like this around and I would like to question why. When there are so many who will disagree with it, why hasn't anyone (as the authour suggests) written their own philosophy of punk? It seems a lot of punkers are very good at complaining but forget that the golden philosophy uniting all factions is "do it yourself".

I would definitely recommend this to anyone who is interested in punk, as it makes it's case well, and comes from within the scene not from some snooty academic. However don't take it as gospel, you're not intended to. Punk is such a huge subject that no one book can properly do it justice. But this should definitely be on any punk rocker or punk fan's reading list. And if you don't like it write your own.
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9 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jacques COULARDEAU on 1 Nov. 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is extremely important to understand the punk movement that started in the US in the mid 70s and exploded in the world from Great Britain in the late 70s with The Sex Pistols and The Clash. The book tends to show that this « musical » movement, this new stage in rock development is unique and lasting. This is true and false at the same time. Music in the United States, and elsewhere in the world, has always been a medium to convey ideas and protest. Folksongs, Gospels, Protest songs, Jazz, Negro Spirituals, Working Class songs, Blues and even Rock and Roll per se have been such media. Nothing new under the sun as for that. We could also quote the use of songs and music by all kinds of tyrannical regimes, or plainly national anthems. We could even quote centuries of church music and sacred music as expressing political ideas in their days. So, what makes the difference with the punk movement ? The author is very clear about it, even if the ideas he expresses here and there are not always perfectly clear. First it is the result of the consciousness among a wide mass of young people, initiallly coming from the working class or alienated classes in cities, suburbs or the countryside, of the fact that they were the victims of an alienation. It became particularly visible in the 70s when a certain affluence among the population at large - in our countries - made it all the more visible : those who did not have anything, those who had no shelter, home, commodities, even decent food, became very conscious of their depravation. The Blacks first of all (and it led to famous inner city aznd ghetto riots), but here, with the punk movement, the whites. This led to strong Black movements like the Black Panthers or the Black Muslims among the Blacks.Read more ›
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