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The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT): Stoic Philosophy as Rational and Cognitive Psychotherapy Paperback – 27 Aug 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 318 pages
  • Publisher: Karnac Books (27 Aug 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1855757567
  • ISBN-13: 978-1855757561
  • Product Dimensions: 22.6 x 14.5 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 286,727 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Donald Robertson is a psychotherapist, specialising in cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), and the treatment of anxiety.

His background is in academic philosophy and he has a special interest in the relationship between ancient philosophy, especially Stoicism, and modern psychotherapy. He is the author of dozens of journal articles and several books on philosophy and psychotherapy:

● Build your Resilience (2012)
● The Practice of Cognitive-Behavioural Hypnotherapy (2012)
● The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (2010)
● The Discovery of Hypnosis: The Complete Writings of James Braid, The Father of Hypnotherapy (2009)

Donald's Website:
www.londoncognitive.com


Product Description

Review

This book is a fascinating interweaving of Stoic philosophy and contemporary cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). Robertson rightly reminds us of how much CBT owes its philosophical origins to the Stoics but, sadly, how often this debt is insufficiently acknowledged. He urges us to redirect our attention to the past to see how modern CBT still has much to learn from its ancient precursors. Highly recommended. --Michael Neenan, Co-Director of the CBT Programme, Centre for Stress Management, Bromley, Kent, UK

Many of us have felt the need for a book that covers the underlying philosophy of the cognitive-behavioural therapies in much greater depth. This book provides us with the missing link between the theory and the philosophy. It is a fascinating read and could be considered as either a prequel or a sequel to the standard textbook read by a trainee or experienced cognitive-behavioural or rational emotive practitioner who wants to understand these approaches to therapy within an historical framework. --Professor Stephen Palmer, PhD, FARBT, FBACP, Director of the Centre for Stress Management, London

The author has uncovered a wealth of connections between modern cognitive-behavioural therapies and ancient Stoic philosophy. It should be read by anyone interested in understanding the historical roots of CBT or in learning about how ancient psychotherapeutic methods can add to the modern therapist's toolkit. --Tim LeBon, UKCP registered psychotherapist and author of 'Wise Therapy'

From the Author

Why should modern psychotherapists be interested in philosophy, especially ancient philosophy? Why should philosophers be interested in psychotherapy? There is a sense of mutual attraction between what are today two thoroughly distinct disciplines. However, arguably it was not always the case that they were distinct.

This book attempts to draw parallels between ancient philosophy and modern psychotherapy, with a particular focus on practical psychological techniques of relevance today.


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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Jules Evans on 8 Sep 2010
Format: Paperback
This is a ground-breaking look at the fascinating dialogue between modern cognitive therapy and ancient Greek philosophy.

The relationship between Stoicism and CBT has been briefly discussed by some - including by the founders of CBT - but this is the first time a book has been written on the philosophical roots of the therapy.

CBT is not the same as Stoicism - there are important differences, as Robertson recounts. But CBT has taken from ancient Greek philosophy not just their cognitive theory of emotions (the idea that our emotions follow our thoughts or beliefs about the world) but also many of their therapeutic techniques, such as the thought journal, training one's attention to the present moment, and the 'Socratic method' of subjecting one's beliefs to rational scrutiny.

Robertson is particularly good at describing the practical therapeutic techniques the Stoics had in their armoury - including some powerful techniques that modern psychotherapy has yet to really exploit, such as the View From Above visualisation technique.

Of course, there are differences between psychology and moral philosophy - their aims, their methods, their context, their professional qualifications. For example, the aim of therapy is 'feeling good', while the aim of Stoicism was more explicitly moral.

But there is a rich dialogue to be had between the two, if both sides have the openness and willingness to talk. Robertson is to be applauded for advancing this dialogue, and transforming our idea both of philosophy, and of psychotherapy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. A. Watts on 27 July 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Extremely interesting particularly for anyone who has delivered CBT. I have always been intrigued by the origins of CBT/REBT and although I have read much on Stoic philosophy this book neatly sums it up and introduced some information that had escaped me.
It is an easy read and available for anyone who believes the Mark Twain quote "The ancients stole all our best ideas"
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rob Clark on 9 Dec 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fabulous book about the 'Philosophy behind CBT counselling. Well written and in a great format, this book provides brilliant information if you are currently studying counselling (degree level).

It really helped me and I have recommended it to many of my colleagues. Absolutely essential information, well referenced and clearly set out. Highly recommended.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M.Devar on 20 Nov 2010
Format: Paperback
I think this book is Magical in that it successfully connects modern CBT with stoic philosophy. This is an incredible achievement given the complexity of the two areas. The Author is able to make connections clear and simple making it a book that is easy to read. A definite bonus to any book. He takes us on a journey through history to present day practice drawing on wonderful insight and deep understanding of philosophy and therapy along the way. It is a must read for anyone interested in therapies or philosophy and anyone who wants to enhance their practice in these areas. This is a fantastic book to have on the shelf or by your bed, to dip in and out of, or to read from cover to cover. It's one of those books that fills you with lots of knowledge and wisdom making you feel quite satisfied and content with your choice of book!!!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Alyson Dunlop on 16 Feb 2011
Format: Paperback
I love this book for many reasons. Having studied classics and cognitive-behavioural hypnotherapy separately, I found this book to be invaluable in understanding more about both. When people first encounter philosophy, it can be overwhelming. It can also be difficult to see its value in our modern society, an unfortunate error that has led to the subject being mistakenly thought of as out-dated and of little importance in the modern world. However, the author of this book presents the subject in such a manner so that anyone - academic or amateur - may understand it. Not only understand it, but appreciate the significance of philosophy to both ancient and modern psychology. Psychotherapists, like the Stoics before them, are in the business of challenging unfounded and irrational beliefs. The ideas set out by these ancient philosophers are the foundations upon which psychotherapy has built itself. The ancient texts have cognitive-behavioural techniques almost identical to those found in CBT today. The importance of this book to anyone practising or studying any branch of psychotherapy or, indeed, philosophy goes without saying. It is an invaluable text to have in any collection. The author is to be commended on bringing together the two subjects, which are actually much closer than you might think. Bravo!
Alyson Dunlop
[...]
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