The Periodic Kingdom: A Journey Into the Land of the Chem... and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.54
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: SHIPS FROM USA: PLEASE ALLOW 10 to 21 BUSINESS DAYS FOR DELIVERY. LIKE NEW!!! Has a small black line on edge of pages. Tracking is not available for orders shipped outside of the United States. If you would like to track your domestic order please be sure to select the Priority/Expedited Shipping option.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.34
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Periodic Kingdom: A Journey into the Land of the Chemical Elements (Science Masters) Paperback – 11 Apr 1997

8 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£0.95
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.94 £2.54

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for your child's school by voting for their favourite book. Learn more.
  • Prepare for the summer with our pick of the best selection for children (ages 0 - 12) across Amazon.co.uk.


Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card and 30 Kindle E-readers for your child or pupil's school.
Vote for your child or pupil(s) favourite book(s) here to be in with a chance to win.

Product details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books (11 April 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465072666
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465072668
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 14 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 40,607 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

P. W. Atkins is university lecturer in physical chemistry at the University of Oxford and a fellow and tutor at Lincoln College, Oxford. He is the author of more than twenty books, including the highly popular "Molecules" and the textbook "Physical Chemistry, " which is used around the world.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
First Sentence
Welcome to the Periodic Kingdom. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Sept. 1998
Format: Paperback
As a pharmacist, I've taken years of advanced chemistry courses. I wish that I'd had this book (The Periodic Kingdom) available during pharmacy school- it would have helped to elucidate some of the most fundamental, yet hard-to-grasp concepts in chemistry. Right now, I'm using Professor Atkins' insightful illumination of the atomic world to help explain these concepts to my 6th-grade son. It beats the dry 6th-grade text any day. I can't praise this book enough.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 April 1999
Format: Paperback
When asked to explain why a certain element behaves a certain way, chemists almost always reach for their well-worn periodic table. When asked to explain in more detail, sooner or later quantum mechanics enters into the discussion. At this stage, for the average person, the question has not been answered, since the answer is likely to be incomprehensible. Enter Atkins' book about the periodic table. Everybody will learn something from it, no matter how (in)experienced they are. Novices at chemistry will learn about the periodic table the right way, and will do so right from the start. Seasoned chemists and chemistry teachers will scratch their heads in amazement at Atkins' ability to turn something difficult into something logical. There's something in here for everybody; it's destined to become a classic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Nov. 1998
Format: Paperback
This book ingeniously explains the fundamental, though often hard to understand, concepts of chemistry, and is very easy to read. It explains the periodic table as a map to a fascinating land: The kingdom of the elements.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark Hurst on 11 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback
Question: is it possible to write an interesting book about the periodic table? This account, published in the budget-priced 'Science Masters' series, is an attempt by Dr Peter Atkins, lecturer in Physical Chemistry and author of a fistful of popular science books.

Atkins's approach is to treat the periodic table as a map of a ficticious kingdom, which allows him to illustrate trends in terms of topography. It's an interesting idea that gets off to a good start by plotting the various physical properties of atoms (mass, diameter, density and ionization energy) as altitudes on a conventional periodic table. The trouble is, after that the geographical metaphor is painfully thin, yet Atkins persists in dragging it out. He does drop his guard occasionally, lapsing into more or less conventional narrative for chapters where the geography theme just doesn't fit. On the whole the style is readable, but constant reference to regions of the table as the 'western desert' and the 'southern island' is tiresome, whilst the use of 'region' to denote an element is downright confusing. Atkins also delights in overblown English, ranting on about 'littorals' and 'assaying the phenomenology' of things. 'Complexity', he spouts at one point, 'can effloresce from subtly different consanguinity'. Such self-indulgent rubbish only distracts us from the story.

The story is a familiar one to most of us with a smattering of chemistry, but to be fair I came away with a few new insights. Despite the awkward attempt to impart a majestic, 'nineteenth-century scientific journal' feel to his account, Atkins sketches a coherent outline of the patterns of atomic structure and how they relate to the elements we see.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback