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The Peopleware Papers: Notes on the Human Side of Programming (Yourdon Press computing series) [Paperback]

Larry L. Constantine
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

6 April 2001 0130601233 978-0130601230 1

This is a successor to Constantine on Peopleware adding 25 new essays in 2 new sections plus an appendix, incorporating all 52 of the author's Peopleware columns from Computer Language Magazine and Software Development Magazine.


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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 1 edition (6 April 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0130601233
  • ISBN-13: 978-0130601230
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 13.7 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 344,911 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

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Product Description

From the Back Cover

When it comes to the human side of software, nobody speaks with as much insight as Larry Constantine: developers and managers worldwide recognize his Constantine on Peopleware as the classic in the field. In The Peopleware Papers, Constantine thoroughly updates all 52 of the legendary columns in that book, and adds 25 new essays published for the first time in book form.

These 77 essays offer powerful guidance on virtually every software development challenge in the "no-man's land" where technical and social issues blur, psychology meets cybernetics, and theory and practice intersect. Constantine's range is extraordinary: project management, group development, discipline vs. chaos, tools, models, methods, processes, personalities, usability, and beyond.

The Peopleware Papers includes two completely new sections: one on organizational culture, and another on making software objects more usable—including Constantine's hard-to-find, breakthrough essays on usage-centered design.

About the Author

LARRY CONSTANTINE has been an innovator in software engineering practice and theory for nearly four decades. He is Adjunct Professor in the School of Computing Sciences at the University of Technology, Sydney (Australia), where he teaches software engineering and organizational change management. He is also Director of Research and Development for Constantine Lockwood, Ltd., a leading consultancy specializing in usage-centered design. In addition to the legendary Constantine on Peopleware, his recent books include Software for Use (Addison-Wesley, with Lucy Lockwood), winner of the 1999 Jolt Product Excellence Award.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Stuff! 26 Jun 2002
By A Customer
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is an immensely readable, informative and entertaining collection of essays.
It covers the aspects of software design and development that don't seem to fit into any predefined category. "Notes on the human side of software", the subtitle of this book, says it all. If like me you're studying software development and feel in need of something fresh to read, which is both thought provoking and stimulating without drowning you in code and theory, treat yourself to this one!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic - well worth the read 5 Nov 2003
By Keith Appleyard VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
Fantastic : I wish I'd read these articles when they were originally published over the period 1992-1995.
There are 77 essays, which even today, 10 years after their original publication, have lost none of their relevance to those working in the field.
There was barely a single essay that I didn't get some benefit from reading, but I particularly liked the essays on.
- Cowboy Coders
- Collaboration
- All of Section 4, Tools, Models and Methods, which gives a number of very visionary essays on CASE
- Reuse
- Usable Objects
- Use Cases
I can't recommend the book enough; I'm certainly going to think twice before I lend it out to anyone, in case it never comes back!
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Format:Paperback
This book, though written some time ago, is a collection of essays (each a few pages long) which can be dipped into very easily. Some might describe the book as light - there's nothing overtly technical or clever about it. But it will appeal to those who like to reflect on what's going on in the software workplace and really provokes you into thinking about good and bad practice. If you're a busy busy busy person who likes everything cut-and-dried you'll probably not get so much out of it.

I loved it, because I am reflective and the writer has a conversational style so the prose and ideas just roll of the page. I think most software people will recognise the truth of the points it makes about stuff like documentation, teamwork, standards, workplace recognition etc., often brilliantly. And they perhaps even might be provoked into changing a few things about what/how they do.

I'd strongly recommend it, especially for those who are newish (less than 5 years) to software development. A lot of those writing software without a background in large scale professional software development would particularly benefit from its author's seasoned experiences and pithy insights. Definitely adds to the 'toolkit'!

I know of no other book like it, though some of the better contributors to software developers bloggers' sites come close on occasion. I'm only giving it four stars, however, because although I loved it I just lacked that final inch of evangelical zeal that would make me fume at someone who bought it and didn't like it!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic - well worth reading 5 Nov 2003
By Keith Appleyard - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Fantastic : I wish I'd read these articles when they were originally published over the period 1992-1995.
There are 77 essays, which even today, 10 years after their original publication, have lost none of their relevance to those working in the field.
There was barely a single essay that I didn't get some benefit from reading, but I particularly liked the essays on.
- Cowboy Coders
- Collaboration
- All of Section 4, Tools, Models and Methods, which gives a number of very visionary essays on CASE
- Reuse
- Usable Objects
- Use Cases
I can't recommend the book enough; I'm certainly going to think twice before I lend it out to anyone, in case it never comes back!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Social Issues in Software Development 20 Oct 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
There are few books that discuss the social issues of software development. This book not only does that, but it has a well-rounded variety of topics.
You don't have to be interested in every topic to get something out of this book. I thought this book would have been worthwhile if I'd only been interested in one or two of the groups of topics.
Since this is a collection of his articles, the chapters tend to be short, so this is a book that tends to be fairly easy-to-read and appropriate for most of the people you might want to recommend it to.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining and Inspiring Bedside Reading 29 Oct 2001
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is a collection of Constantine's columns published in a variety of magazines. I was not familiar with his work previously, and this book shows why he was a successfuly columnist: In each of his 4-6 page chapters, he successfully drives a particular point home.
This book is probably not suitable as a text book for any particular topic, but it can get your thought process in various disciplines started. Since the chapters are very short and independent, it is ideally suited as bathroom or bedside reading material. What works a bit to the detriment of this strategy is that the chapters are sorted by topic; counterintuitive as this may sound, in a book like this, I would prefer for the topics to be mixed up.
A slight peeve is the unsealed paper binding of this book, which smudges easily. I hope publishers are reconsidering their use of this binding, which seems to be on the increase.
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read software classic. 25 Nov 2013
By drmparks - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a software classic. A collection of Larry Constantine's articles written over time, this books captures the practical considerations for humans building software, and that software is built for humans. If you work in the software industry, and in particular develop software, this is one of the top 10 books that should be on your reading list.
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