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The Peaceable Kingdom: A Primer in Christian Ethics Hardcover – Dec 1983

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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 179 pages
  • Publisher: University of Notre Dame Press (Dec. 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0268015538
  • ISBN-13: 978-0268015534
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 16.5 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,922,417 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

'Exciting , provocative, and challenging...the value of this excellent book can hardly be overstated.' -- Review of Books and Religion --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Stanley Hauerwas is Gilbert T. Rowe Professor of Theological Ethics at Duke University. His many books include the SCM publications With the Grain of the Universe (2002) and Wilderness Wanderings (2001) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Feb. 1998
Format: Paperback
This book is the best introduction to "Christianity according to Hauerwas." This is not a general survery of different ideas about Christian ethics. But rather a presentation of a distinct way of doing "Christian ethics" (which really means a distinct way of doing Christianity). Hauerwas rejects both "liberal" and "conservative" versions of Christianity because both are ultimately based in the thought patterns of the classical Liberalism, which falsely presents itself as religion based on universal reason. In reality, all reason and religion is based on particular truth claims, embodied in the narratives that shape different communities. Hauerwas presents the truth of the Christian narrative, emphasizing how it must be embodied in the Church, if any one is ever to see that it is true. Particularly important in the demonstation of Christian truth claims is the Church's commitment to peace (a very particular form of Christian non-violence). To grasp the significance of what Hauerwas is saying in this book, is to have commonly accepted understandings of the Church and Christian "ethics" radically challenged, and possibly to have them replaced by a wonderfully compelling account of what it means to be a Christian.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 April 1999
Format: Paperback
For four weeks I resisted the professor who had assigned Hauerwas; I battled Hauerwas on narrative's value and on his "obvious" lack of appreciation for the Brothers Niebuhr. I'd take Augustine's "just war" or Mouw's Divine Command ethics any day. Then it happened. I started doing ethics in the middle; I pitched three fourths of Kant and most of the consequentialists. I saw peace as the singular Christ trait, and I was ashamed and penitent. I read on through more and more Hauerwas to find how to "do church" as just such an authentic--albeit alien community. I don't know if I'm ready to walk over hot coals to march on Kosavo, but if Hauerwas left, I'd follow. To read Hauerwas changes Christians. Others probably won't "get" him because it takes a hefty amount of divine intervention to trust God that much. In the year since I first read this book I have had to re-think and/or re-tool everything about being a Christian. This is authentic Christianity--not the accommodationist Warrior-Christianity of Constantine, Belfast and Belgrade--and dare I say most American "chump-morality" preaching. Go ahead, fight with Hauerwas. I double dare ya! Watch the tools of peaceableness metamorphose you. I know.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. Meadows on 25 April 2014
Format: Paperback
Having read Hauerwas' autobiography (Hannah's Child) last year, I was keen to read more of what he wrote. The two stand-out books that seemed to define his theological thinking were Resident Aliens and The Peaceable Kingdom. Subtitled A Primer in Christian Ethics, I understood this to be his exposition of pacifist theology.

From the start, it struck me that this was quite a "dense" book. Though it's not incredibly long, it is tightly argued and quite technical in places, where I admit I didn't quite understand the detail of his argument, and in some places even the general direction of the argument was lost on me.

Some of the confusion may come about because at times Hauerwas conflates, or at least uses interchangeably, the terms 'morals' and 'ethics' whereas I see the former as foundational (the bricks) and the latter as what is constructed from them (the house). The opening part of the book is very one of moral philosophy rather than theology. His opening contention is that ethics cannot stand on its own, but must be defined within a specified paradigm, in this case the paradigm of christian ethics. In this respect, it is most certainly not a book of apologetics. His discussion of 'qualified ethic' and of the nature of 'agency' rather passed me by, so I cannot comment much on this.

As he eventually gets into a theological discussion, he seems to show a slightly Bultmannian viewpoint that we can't really know anything about Jesus, but that the New Testament, and the gospels in particular, are solely reflective of the early church's view, though contradictorily, he also places emphasis on the church's declaration of the death and resurrection.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ann Gleeson on 1 Feb. 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a readable book but it is hardly a 'primer' in ethics. Stanley Hauerwas, an American nonconformist theologian, writes about an approach to ethics which depends upon cultivating the virtues which enables a person to assess and resolve ethical problems. It is an answer to those who look at ethics from a 'Quandry' perspective. Those interested in ethics will find this book stimulating, but theologians may find it lacks philosophical depth.
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By Breconmary on 30 Mar. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought as a reference book for my daughter at 'vicar school' this was on her reading list and proved very useful.
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