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The Pathfinder Paperback – 27 Aug 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 282 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (27 Aug 2013)
  • ISBN-10: 1492263613
  • ISBN-13: 978-1492263616
  • Product Dimensions: 25.4 x 17.8 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,527,389 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Excellent edition for class use, what with both of Cooper's prefaces and the series in general. AND an essay to provide historical context, a chronology, a bibliography--and still more. This should be the edition of choice for the classroom."--Cameron C. Nnickels, James Madison University"Clearly and carefully edited, this volume is a very useful addition to your excellent series."--E.N. Feltskog, University of Wisconsin --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was a prolific and popular American writer of the early 19th century. His historical romances of frontier and Indian life in the early American days created a unique form of American literature. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By James Chester on 2 Feb 2006
Format: Paperback
Style 4/5; Plot 2/5; Readability 4/5.
The fourth book written in the Leatherstocking Tales, but the third in the saga if yo're reading them in the order of the sequence of events they describe. This story is set after the events of "The Deerslayer" and "The Last of the Mohicans" but before those of "The Pioneers" and "The Prairie".
It is far less descriptive of the countryside and scenery than the preceeding two stories, with much more dialogue. This makes the pace of the narrative much faster and, as a consequence, much more readable. Much of the dialogue is taken up with the different characters discussing their own particular philosophy concerning the various situations they find themselves in. This in no way slows the pace but helps in building a mental picture of the characters.
Even though there were love-interests in the other two stories this episode is certainly the most romantic. Cooper takes a lot of liberties/artistic licence with the historical facts surrounding the setting of the story, and the plot is often predictable, although some of the things you see coming still take you by surprise, as they happen sooner than you expect them to. That said, it is an enjoyable read and my personal favourite of the saga so far.
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By Frank Bierbrauer on 4 April 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Pathfinder is the third in the series of Leatherstocking Tales about Natty Bumpo (previously called Deerslayer as a young man and Hawkeye in The Last of the Mohicans). This time Natty is in middle age, no longer a young man but still a fit and vigorous one. His task is to guide the daughter of Sargeant Dunham as well as her uncle, Mabel Dunham and Captain Cap. He continues to guide for the British army during the seven years war. After surviving the first journey to bring young Mabel into the arms of her father he and his friend Jasper Western are told to see how the land lies in one of the "thousand islands" in Lake Ontario. Gradually he falls in love with Mabel although there is some understanding that Mabel has interest in the much younger Jasper. So, it is a tale of unrequited love and loss. It also turns around the story from Deerslayer where the young woman Judith had fallen for Natty although he did not love her. The wheel turns as they say and it is Natty's turn. The ending when Mabel decides for Jasper is heart breaking and well written. Not as powerful as The Last of the Mohicans but it still holds the reader. A good read.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By James Chester on 1 Feb 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Style 4/5; Plot 2/5; Readability 4/5.
This was the fourth book that Cooper wrote in the Leatherstocking Tales, but is actually the third in the saga if you are reading them in the chronological sequence of the events they describe, being set after the events of "The Deerslayer" and "The Last Last Of The Mohicans" but before the events described in "The Pioneers" and "The Prairie".
It is far less descriptive of the countryside and scenery than the two preceding stories, with much more dialogue. This gives a much faster pace to the narrative than the previous two, even though a lot of the discourse is based around the various characters discussing their own particular philosophies.
The plot takes a lot of liberties in respect of artistic licence regarding the historical setting of the story. It is also very predictable in places, although some of the things you can see coming still take you by surprise, as they happen sooner than you expect them to. In spite of this, as a story, it is very enjoyable and the faster pace of the narrative keeps you wanting to read the next chapter.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 12 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Not as good as "Mohicans" but a nice sequel. 17 Jun 1997
By Stuart W. Mirsky - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
For lovers of adventure, pioneer tales, westerns and Cooper's own "leatherstocking" stories, this one's not bad. Not up to the pacing, depth or vision demonstrated by Cooper in "The Last of the Mohicans", this book nevertheless continues the adventures of the wilderness scout Natty Bumppo ("Hawkeye" in "Mohicans" and "Pathfinder" here). Still the prototype of that strong, silent and simple man of virtue (who finds a higher moral calling in the wilderness among his beloved Indians and far from the zones of civilization whom we met in "Mohicans"), Natty now seems somewhat older (though not much time appears to have elapsed) and longing, at last, for what he has always eschewed: a place and family of his own. Brought to a lakeside fort (Lake Ontario) at the urging of an old friend who is in charge of running the day to day soldiering at the fort and who desires to play matchmaker between his daughter and Pathfinder, Natty soon finds himself in the midst of intrigue and betrayal on the lake. It is still the time of the French and Indian Wars and the action involves naval activity on the lake and in the Thousand Islands. But Natty soon finds he has competition for the hand of his old friend's daughter in the person of a young naval officer who promptly falls under suspicion because of his French origins. In the end, Pathfinder must get to the bottom of the betrayal while making the noble choice with regard to the fair maiden and his rival for her hand. The action involves a swift "sea" chase over Ontario and a denoument among the Thousand Islands as Pathfinder and his faithful companion, Chingachgook, seek to protect the small military force in their charge from a French attack which is aided by unknown turncoats in their midst. It's a good story but less powerful, and a good deal more wooden, than "Mohicans". Natty, himself, seems a might too talkative for the strong silent type he is alleged to be (didn't seem as problematic in the earlier "Mohicans" as it does here), but there are some good moments including an opening scene where the great forested country is vividly depicted, a fine shooting match at the fort (reminiscent of Scott's knightly tourneys), an exciting chase across the face of the lake and a fine wrap-up when Pathfinder struggles to save the outgunned outpost in his charge. Still this one read better when I was much younger than it does today.

Stuart W. Mirsky
author of The King of Vinland's Saga
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Exciting Tale 11 Aug 2000
By "fusilier10" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I originally wanted to read the Last of the Mohicans because of the very enjoyable movie but I picked up this book and chose to read it first. I do not regret my decision. I was unaware when I began reading this book in the Leatherstocking series that it was not the first book in the series. A reader who has not read other books in the series can feel confident that they won't feel lost if they start reading this book. The book portrays very detailed images of the forests, lakes, rivers, and people of the French and Indian War time period during the 18th century. The character development and plot are very well done. The book also gives a glimpse of the harsh realities of war during this time period. The writing style of the book is also fascinating and reminds me, at times, of epic poetry. I highly recommend it.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A good adventure 30 April 2002
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In this, the third Leatherstocking tale chronologically (after Deerslayer and Last of the Mohicans), James Fenimore Cooper takes us, once again, to his vision of pure, unadultered, nature. Once again he weaves a tale around his ideas of morality, race, and religion. This time around Leatherstocking (known here as Pathfinder) is the pursuer of love, whereas before (in Deerslayer) he was the pursued.
These three books are the only ones that I have read to this point, and it is true that both this and the Deerslayer are more of romances than the Last of the Mohicans, which is an adventure.
Alot of people give the other books in the series flack because they are expecting the same as what they read in Last of the Mohicans. However, if you begin reading the book without those preconcived notions leading to disappointment, I think you will find that the other books are equally entertaining
All three are great books and I highly recommend them all.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Sequal to Mohicans 27 Dec 1999
By Geoff Livingston - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Chronologically speaking, this is the sequal to Last of the Mohicans, though not written in that order. Pathfinder returns us to the Seven Years War in colonial times. A great book, Pathfinder is probably Cooper's most romantic book in its depictions of upstate New York, the most modern of his writing capabilities, and the most active in its depiction of war. Enjoy.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Upon the inland sea........... 13 May 2003
By nto62 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In the fourth installment of the Leatherstocking Tales, Cooper introduces a nautical theme upon the surface and along the shores of Lake Ontario. The Pathfinder is ultimately a love story tinged with the conspiracy of treason, though it takes no extra-sensory perception to uncover the traitor long before he is exposed in the book. Cap, a grizzled saltwater veteran, accompanies his niece to visit her father stationed at the British outpost of Fort Oswego, NY. Once there, the two become embroiled in the confrontation between England, France, and their Native American allies for control of the lake. Cap is dismissive of landlubbers and "freshwater ponds", such as he describes Ontario, setting the stage for his mind to be turned by the derring-do of inland waterman, Jasper Western. Indeed, Cap is so outspoken in his contempt for the ways of his new found associates, that he becomes somewhat of an annoyance to the reader. Cooper chose to give the character little in the way of redeeming qualities nearly spoiling the pleasure one takes in Cap's ultimate and grudging respect for the wilderness and the men who master it. Such a thoroughly boorish character simply creates no emotional connection. But, Cap isn't guilty of treason. You'll spot the traitor shortly after he appears.
The Pathfinder is formulaic, utterly predictable, and, at times, almost childlike in substance, but throughout, as in all other Leatherstocking Tales, radiates the simple goodness, manly deportment, and rustic charm of Nathaniel Bumppo. Indeed, Bumppo as a character is so masterfully wrought that Cooper could place him in a melon patch for the duration of a book and still manage to eke out a classic. Having previously read The Pioneers, The Last of the Mohicans, and The Prairie, I find The Pathfinder the weaker of the four, but fourth in favor in this wonderful series of stories isn't any black mark. Indeed, it qualifies The Pathfinder as yet another loveable yarn from the pen of James Fenimore Cooper. 4+ stars.
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