The Past 2013

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An Iranian man deserts his French wife and two children to return to his homeland. Meanwhile, his wife starts up a new relationship, a reality her husband confronts upon his wife's request for a divorce.

Starring:
Bérénice Bejo, Tahar Rahim
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

The Past (2013)

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_12_and_over
Runtime 2 hours 10 minutes
Starring Bérénice Bejo, Tahar Rahim, Ali Mosaffa
Director Asghar Farhadi
Genres Drama
Studio FUSION MEDIA SALES
Rental release 9 June 2014
Main languages French
Subtitles English
Discs
  • Feature ages_12_and_over
Runtime 2 hours 10 minutes
Starring Bérénice Bejo, Tahar Rahim, Ali Mosaffa
Director Asghar Farhadi
Genres Drama
Studio Fusion Media Sales
Rental release 9 June 2014
Main languages French
Subtitles English

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By dipesh parmar on 30 Mar 2014
Format: DVD
Iranian director Asghar Farhadi follows up his Oscar-winning drama `A Separation' with `The Past', a French film set in Paris where Marie (Bérénice Bejo) is going through a divorce with her estranged Iranian husband Ahmad (Ali Mosaffa).

After being absent for around 4 years, Ahmad eventually responds to Marie's many summons to sign the divorce papers. He learns that many things have changed, that Marie now has a new partner in Samir (Tahar Rahim). Samir has a young son called Fouad (Elyes Aguis), to add to Marie's two daughters Lea (Jeanne Jestin) and the teenage Lucie (Pauline Burlet) from her first marriage. This complicated family structure is further fractured by the fact that Samir is still married, whose wife Céline is in a coma. And its Celine's hospitalisation which triggers the emotional turmoil in everyone concerned.

Everyone seems to have dual existences, caught between the past and the current and unable to find a path to the future. Somehow, Marie has to decide what is best for herself and her family. She, and she alone needs to decide what the future holds for everyone. Farhadi's complex, intricate drama is a tragedy of good intentions and wrong decisions that seemed right at the time. Celine's situation is played like a murder-mystery, unravelled with consummate timing by Farhadi. It seems easier to cut your losses and move on, but nobody is capable of doing so. Paradoxically, Celine seems to have got off lightly.

Directing in a different language and culture, Farhadi has still managed to pull off another outstanding film. The acting, from the children to the adults, is quite extraordinary. As with `A Separation' and `About Elly', Farhadi manages to show a naturalistic humanity in all the characters.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Antenna TOP 500 REVIEWER on 30 Mar 2014
Format: DVD
Expectations raised by Iranian director Asghar Farhadi's earlier film, "The Separation" are not disappointed. "The Past" is an absorbing, subtle and complex drama of relationships set in the everyday world of a Parisian suburb where ordinary people have to juggle the needs of work and childcare with sorting out their emotional lives. Shifting between the characters' different perspectives, it manages to arouse empathy for them all in the process. Even with subtitles, the dialogue is excellent, reminding me of a very accessible Pinter play.

For reasons which are never fully explained, four years previously Iranian Ahmed left his French pharmacist wife Marie and her two daughters with whom he gets on well, although he is not their father. The film opens with his return to Paris at Marie's request to sign their divorce papers. Yet it is clear from the outset that, although they both regard their marriage as over, a natural intimacy between them still remains, they know each other so well. Marie can instruct Ahmed to help her drive by changing gear, since her arm is too painful for this. She even asks him to find out what is bugging her teenage daughter Lucie. It is not surprising that Marie's new lover Samir feels resentful and excluded. He is also trapped in the tragic effects of an ill-considered action taken by his wife, and the wonderfully acted scenes of his small son witnessing the drama of dysfunctional adult relationships and trying to make sense of them are poignant in the extreme. The little boy continually tries to apply the rules he has just learned only to find that some new factor contradicts them. Having learned the need to apologise for his bad behaviour, he then has to grasp that some adult breaches are simply too grave to be pardoned.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By johann28 on 9 July 2014
Format: DVD
This highly complex, intricate drama is a tragedy of good intentions and bad beginnings messily intertwined with wrong decisions that seemed right at the time - Farhadi shows the desperation and anger involved in trying to annul incorrect life choices and defy the past. An excellent opening sequence shows an about to be divorced married couple banging their car while reversing - looking back needs careful handling.

It's perhaps a little contrived in places, but this a very sophisticated, morally serious film from a sophisticated, morally serious film maker at the top of his game; a pressure cooker of passion and anguish. Just as in 'A Separation', it is the agony of splitting that reveals the truth of a relationship most clearly, with some very subtle political resonances also. Everywhere there are layers upon layers of unspoken reproach, guilt and fear, and the ending is absolutely heart-rending.

A number of characters here advise each other to forget, to break the past's terrible grip. But it is not so easy - forgetting the past means losing much of the present and much of oneself. Sombre and difficult to watch at times it may be, but this is wonderful film-making that will appeal to anyone with intelligence and life experience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Svensson on 7 July 2014
Format: DVD
Fabulous movie. Don't listen to the voices in some rewievs telling you this is a mediocre film. If you like slow-paced, on the spot-acting films this is the one. Nothing is "visible" in this film. By this I mean everything moves forward so efortlessly that neither the camera, the script... anything is ever "traced".
The actors outdo almost any "top" hollywood actor/actress. This is so subtle, moving deeper and deeper into the caracters, letting you getting to know other(s) perspectives so gradually you can feel it like a shiver down the spine.
I have a collection of about 1400 films spanning from silent movies onto almost every existing genre, covering all the great silverscreen creations worth mentioning... and this is right up there, in the very top of my best-of-list.
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