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The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang Hardcover – 29 Oct 1992

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Hardcover, 29 Oct 1992
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 308 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1st Edition edition (29 Oct. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0198661819
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198661818
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 2.9 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,901,375 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

There is a great deal in 'Stone the Crows' that will amuse and intrigue browsers. (Henry Hitchings, Times Literary Supplement) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

About the Editors: John Simpson is co-editor of the Oxford English Dictionary (Second Edition) and editor of the Concise Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs. John Ayto is author of the Longman Register of New Words and the Glutton's Glossary.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paula Wynne on 7 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback
There's no end to the `mind-blowing' power of Modern Slang. As a mouse is electronically wired to a laptop so too will this dictionary become an intravenous drip to a writer. Hey ho, writers and authors ...

When Modern Slang arrived at iHubbub HQ to be reviewed it should have duly been stacked at the bottom of my review pile, but something about the cover (maybe the wedge of cheese) made me flick through it before jamming it under at least 17 others.

And before I knew it, I was in writers' wonderland!

At first flicking through and then avidly fixated with each page. If dinner, partners, kids and life in general didn't get in the way, an aspiring writer, and indeed any well-tuned author, could get lost in this book only to reappear when they've chewed through every word.
Character Labels

Not only can you find modern ways with dialogue, but you can create sparkling `labels' for your characters. Have a good nose through the thematic section, it's like bottled inspiration!

Don't give a boring account of a man with no hair. Bald is out. Slaphead is in - especially if you want him to be a ruffian or dodgy character. For example, when describing your suspect ... let's call him Mike ... why write `Mike was bald' when you could scribe `a slaphead in a three piece suit'. Why give another character `big eyes' when they can have `lamps' ... or they may have `peepers' for that matter.

Your teens or young guns wouldn't say `this room stinks' more likely they would grunt out a `this joint is minging'. If you had to kill off a character for whatever reason why would they be `dead' when they could be `pushing up daisies'?
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Nicholas Le Poidevin on 3 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I view this dictionary as complementary to the Oxford Dictionary of Slang and to the Chambers Slang Dictionary. It is less comprehensive than these, but does give a useful background to the expressions that it contains. It is much more restrained than the Chambers and as with Chambers there is not any English to Slang index, a good point about the Oxford Dictionary of Slang. It is useful in giving an explanation of many common slang expressions, but the more curious minded or less prudish may well be disappointed.The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (Oxford Paperback Reference)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The title says it all - it's a dictionary. No more, no less. Don't expect any winding tales of word and phrase origins, because you won't find any. Why? Because this is a dictionary, not an etymology book. What do you want, a genie to pop up only to tell you to bugger off (buy it, and look that one up)? You get your money's worth, and that's more than I can say for most books these days.
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By Es on 26 Dec. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought as a pressie for a Polish co-worker trying to learn English but was being taught "BBC" style and didn't have a good understanding of every day street language. Great dictionary and some highly amusing definitions for those who have English as their first language - almost tempted to buy one for myself!
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