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The Omen Machine Hardcover – 18 Aug 2011


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Hardcover, 18 Aug 2011
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (18 Aug 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007396759
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007396757
  • Product Dimensions: 15.9 x 4.7 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (88 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 271,715 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Goodkind was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska, where he also attended art school, one of his many interests on the way to becoming a writer. Besides a career in wildlife art, he has been a cabinet maker, violin maker, and he has done restoration work on rare and exotic artifacts from around the world -- each with its own story to tell, he says. In 1983 Goodkind moved to the forested mountains he loves. There, in the woods near the ocean, he built the house where he and his wife, Jeri, live, and came at last to tell his own stories.

Product Description

Review

‘Few writers have Goodkind’s power of creation’
Publishing News

‘Goodkind’s greatest triumph: the ability to introduce instantly identifiable characters. His heroes, like us, are not perfect. Instead, each is flawed in ways that strengthen rather than weaken their impact.’
SFX

‘A real born storyteller'
Anne McCaffrey

'Everything one could ask for in an epic fantasy'
Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Goodkind was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska, where he also attended art school, one of his many interests on the way to becoming a writer. Besides a career in wildlife art, he has been a cabinet maker, violin maker, and he has done restoration work on rare and exotic artifacts from around the world – each with its own story to tell, he says. In 1983 Goodkind moved to the forested mountains he loves. There, in the woods near the ocean, he built the house where he and his wife Jeri live, and came at last to tell his own stories.


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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 55 people found the following review helpful By gdyfldfh on 26 Aug 2011
Format: Hardcover
Terry Goodkind, the marmite of fantasy fiction, returns back to the world of the Sword of Truth series with a new adventure revolving around the main protagonists Richard and Kahlan, as well as fan favourites Zedd, Nicci and Nathan, not to mention every sadomasochist's wet dream, the Mord-Sith. If you are even considering reading this then, like me, you have followed Richard and Kahlan through the previous 12 novels and at this stage you will probably read anything Terry Goodkind churns out without a second thought to its quality.

The Omen Machine takes place a day after the events of Confessor and marks the start of a new focus for the series following Richard and Kahlan's triumph over the Imperial Order. Shockingly enough, the book revolves around a newly discovered machine that spouts out increasingly dire prophecies that has everyone in a panic.

Looking firstly at what's good with the book, it is actually very readable and will have you finishing it within several hours. Terry has done away with the usual 20-page morality lectures and in it's place is a fairly well-paced novel that continually builds on the suspense. Additionally, we get to see and learn much more about D'Hara than ever before.

However, there is also the bad to contend with, and unfortunately there's a lot of it. Firstly, the book is frustratingly short and ends incredibly abruptly. Although this makes for a fast-paced novel and strongly indicates further sequels, the book loses that feeling of epicness that you'd find in the other books in the series especially the earlier ones. Additionally, almost 99% of the novel occurs in the People's Palace, further reducing that epic feeling.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. D. Hillman on 26 Aug 2011
Format: Hardcover
This review will pain me as I love (and I mean LOVED) the original sword of truth book series... I'm sorry for what I'm about to say Mr Goodkind!

First off I must start by saying that this book is fairly short and is NOT worth the £9.99 I paid for the kindle verion (more on this later).

The book was ok, I managed to read it in just under an evening (4 ish hours with breaks etc).

I think its about 500 or so pages but the text is very large and in reality, I think this might push its luck to clock in at 300 pages.
Also while there are 60 ish chapters, they are very short.

The story itself is actually fairly generic as far as a SoT novel goes. It seems a little formulaic:

1) Something occurs that people can't figure out
2) Richard broods, raptor glares.
3) Generic bad guy who is the most dangerous person evaaar makes an appearance.
4) People say that the situation is impossible. Cue general hand wringing etc.
5) Richard figures everything out and makes the bad thing go away.

I would find this hard to reccomend to someone unless they are a hardcore fan of the series and then, they should show caution. The usual cast turn up but some of them do seem out of charector sometimes.

Regarding the kindle pricing, £9.99 is way too much for an ebook! I'm sorry I paid it, I should have waited a few weeks till my local library had it in stock!
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36 of 42 people found the following review helpful By southcoastreviewer VINE VOICE on 20 Aug 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
... but I was surprised by the Omen Machine. Mainly pleasantly, but surprised nevertheless.

At first I thought it was shorter than Goodkind's Sword of Truth offerings. Having re-checked Confessor and Phantom, it would appear I was correct. At 525 pages of story (not sure where Amazon gets the 608 from), and with larger and wider spaced text, it is more compact than Sword of Truth novels. And you can tell.

Don't get me wrong - OM (Omen Machine) is a great novel. But in the rich deep world that Goodkind created for the SoT series, characters and relationships were built up - the gradual carving of characters in Wizard's First Rule was what turned me in to a raging fantasy fiction fan. All those core characters carry through in to OM, but something seems... wrong.

The core story is, as you can obviously surmise from the title, based around a machine that produces omens and, basically, causes havoc. With some Hamlet-esque witchery thrown in. Throughout the entire novel, there is an intense focus on prophecy which is unprecedented compared to SoT books, because "normal" people are asking about it - in previous books, people were too scared to. I couldn't understand if it was the guise of 'peace' that made the majority of normal people feel empowered to start back-chatting to the Lord Rahl and Mother Confessor, but Terry appears to be asking readers to take a lot of this new move in opinion / politics on strength, as opposed to carefully crafting the world like he did in previous books. The book is highly readable, so I suspect it's a move that is going to pay off - even if some of the language he uses in a fantasy world is quite modern (Kahlan saying "game on" ...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. Taylor on 22 Jun 2012
Format: Hardcover
I think at some point an Author just has to hold up their hands and say `look, I've achieved the height of my career already. Any further material I put out would just be a substandard attempt to keep the bank balance turning over'

This is how I felt reading `The Omen Machine'

If you compare this book to say Wizards First Rule, it reads more like a serialisation that would have run in an SF Magazine rather than a novel in its own right.

To be fair, Goodkind is easy to read, but this is really a poor addition to the series
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