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The Official Scrabble Player's Dictionary Hardcover – 22 Feb 1996


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Hardcover, 22 Feb 1996
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 693 pages
  • Publisher: Merriam Webster,U.S.; 3rd edition edition (22 Feb. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0877792208
  • ISBN-13: 978-0877792208
  • Product Dimensions: 3.8 x 17.1 x 24.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,074,172 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Synopsis

Lists brief definitions for the thousands of two- to eight-letter words allowed to be used in the game of Scrabble.

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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

87 of 87 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 April 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I feel I must correct all the other reviews of this book given to date which criticise it's use of American words, and removal of any words possibly deemed offensive.
In Britain, Scrabble is played by Chambers' "Official Scrabble Words", based upon the latest edition of the Chambers Dictionary. In the US they base their word list upon Merriam-Webster's Dictionary, and all club and tournament games are played using the contents of that lexicon, but without any possibly offensive words.
Hence, the contents of the OSPD (this book) are the exact words allowed in official games of Scrabble in America - like it or lump it, that's the way the Yanks play it.
This book should not really be bought or used by anyone outside of the US - players in Britain should use Chambers' Official Scrabble Words instead, since this is the official British word source.
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 Dec. 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
An extremely frustrating book to use for players with a vocabulary that extends beyond North American usages; the censoring of words 'likely to offend' is inappropriate. I'd buy the Chambers dictionary instead were I doing it again!
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 Oct. 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a seriously misguided edition. Words which appeared in the First and Second editions but are now considered "likely to offend" have been eliminated. This means that some of the oldest words in the English language have been erased, even though the rules of Scrabble expressly permit archaic and slang terms. Merriam-Webster's job is not that of moral arbiter and if they thought it important to have a version suitable for children, then they should have released a separate children's edition, rather than mutilating the adults' one.
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41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Littrell TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 16 Nov. 2003
Format: Hardcover
The OSPD is no ordinary dictionary. There are capsule definitions given but no usage tips. All the entries are in caps. Since there are no proper names allowed, this doesn't matter. The most important information about the entries (from the point of view of the Scrabble player) is how they are spelled, how they are made plural, how the gerund and past tenses are formed, and whether you can make comparatives or superlatives out of the word and how.
For example the plural of "bijou" (a jewel) is either "bijoux" or "bijous," and the OSPD gives that info. The gerund of "snib" (to latch) is "snibbing" while the comparative of "sleazy" is "sleazier" and the superlative, "sleaziest." There is also the adverb, "sleazily."
The -er form of a word is listed separately. If you don't find it, it's not a word!--or at least that should be our agreement. For example "renown" is a noun and a verb but there is no "renowner"--"someone who makes renown" since the verb is intransitive, but there is a "tearer"--"one who tears." (There's also a "terror," but never mind.)
By the way, words beginning with the prefix "re" as in, e.g., "reword" are listed separately from words that begin with the "re" that is not a prefix. Again, "renown" is not listed after "rename" but follows "renovate" a few pages later.
The other peculiarities of the entries are explained in the Introduction, which I highly recommend you read. (Be sure your informed opponent has read it!) There it is explained why "You should look always look at several entries above and below the expected place..." when searching for the word in question. You should also read the brief Preface in which the editors explain why some offensive (especially four-letter) words do not appear.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 Oct. 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a seriously misguided edition. Words which appeared in the First and Second editions but are now considered "likely to offend" have been eliminated. This means that some of the oldest words in the English language have been erased, even though the rules of Scrabble expressly permit archaic and slang terms. Merriam-Webster's job is not that of moral arbiter and if they thought it important to have a version suitable for children, then they should have released a separate children's edition, rather than mutilating the adults' one.
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18 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Sept. 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Stewart Holden's review is also incorrect. OSPD is an amalgamation of several dictionaries, all but one out of print. It has also had words marked as offensive removed from it. Tournament and Club Scrabble players in the US and Canada use a book called the Official Tournament and Club Word List, which is OSPD plus those offensive words, and with a little bit more careful error checking. OTaCWL is only available to tournament and club players.
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