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The Nineteenth Century: The British Isles 1815-1901 (Short Oxford History of the British Isles) Paperback – 25 May 2000


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Product details

  • Paperback: 360 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (25 May 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0198731434
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198731436
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 2 x 13.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 267,905 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Amazon Review

Victorian Britain was Britain at its best--a dynamic economy, a powerful empire, a stable class society (eventually) and a bold spirit of invention and design. Victorian Britain was also the country at its worst--a yawning poverty gap, a religious fervour that fed racism social neglect and a philistinism that closed British culture off from its European heritage. It was, in other words, an age of contradictions, many of which are neatly captured in this volume in the "Short Oxford History of the British Isles". Colin Matthew and his team offer a series of thematic chapters, which take in the economy, empire, religion, the "woman" question, and the arts and architecture. There are helpful maps and an accurate chronology. There is more on culture than on politics or foreign policy. References to Darwin outnumber those to Disraeli. One or two contributions are too specialised for a volume of this sort, others are too schematic and pointillist. Only Martin Daunton on the economy gets the whole century into perspective. For better or for worse, historians are usually rather reticent and reserved in their judgement of the Victorian achievement, and this collection is no exception. --Miles Taylor

Review

"Excellent surveys with many fresh insights", (W H Fraser, Professor, University of Strathclyde)

The formula of encouraging experts to contribute a chapter on their own field of speciality results in the reader being treated convincingly to opinions and arguments abreast with current histography s

Matthew's Nineteenth Century comes as near to authoritative knowledge as is possible (Richard Davenport-Hines, Times Literary Supplement,)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The Great Exhibition of 1851, held in the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park, stands as a symbol of British economic power in the nineteenth century, a visible expression of the country's economic might. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. William Land on 14 Nov. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
this book should be a must have for anyone interested in 19c history and would be a fantastic and credible resource for all students, well structured and very readable whilst staying accurate and informative.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Freya on 8 Jan. 2013
Format: Paperback
This work offers an easy access introduction to topics that otherwise can be quite dull and heavy. It works as both a general reading and academic starting point and unless you are an expert on any of the topics (if so, why are you looking for introductory piece) then hopefully you should find something engaging. There is more to the past than any single subject area and even if you aren't drawn to one when you first start, give it a go.
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0 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Greg Withnail on 23 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback
1. I received this book as a Christmas present from someone who knew I was researching a novel set in the nineteenth century.
2. I looked through the contents for "health" and for "medicine" - nothing.
3. I looked through the index for "health" and for "medicine" - nothing.
4. I put the book down.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
Good book on a miserable period 10 Aug. 2014
By Al Singh - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In the nineteenth century Britain was at its zenith in terms of wealth and power and standing in the world. That said, nineteenth century Britain sounds like a perfectly dreadful place to live. One can understand the reaction of the Romantics against industrial Britain, its class hierarchy, and its genteel hypocrisy. This book was not as critical as others, but even though it paints a picture of Victorian Britain as a culturally vibrant society, the seamy reality seeps through the mostly glowing narrative. This was not an exciting book, but it covers an important chunk of history that in some ways is as remote from the modern era as the Middle Ages. I always tended to think that Romanticism was escapist folly, but after reading this book I definitely understand it better.
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