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The Night Eternal (The Strain Trilogy) Mass Market Paperback – 29 May 2012


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The Night Eternal (The Strain Trilogy) + The Fall: 2/3 (The Strain Trilogy) + The Strain
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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 539 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Collins USA (29 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062130595
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062130594
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.8 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (99 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 351,699 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Praise for THE NIGHT ETERNAL:

‘A devilishly good read, full of satisfying scares’ Stephen King

Praise for THE FALL:
‘The climax, all fire and brimstone, nicely sets up the third and final volume’ Financial Times

‘Enough blood-curdling action to set up a gory finale’ News of the World

‘Relentlessly paves the way for what promises to be an epic third book’ Kirkus

Praise for THE STRAIN:
‘A near-flawless thriller’ News of the World

‘A rattling piece of escapism’ The Times

‘The first in a trilogy that soars with spellbinding intrigue. Truly, an unforgettable tale you can’t put down once you read the first page. I can’t wait until the next one.’ Clive Cussler

‘Blood and apocalypse mix in a terrifying story that feels like it was ripped from today's headlines. Vividly wrought and relentlessly paced, THE STRAIN haunts as much as it terrifies. I cannot wait to see where Del Toro and Hogan take us next.’ James Rollins

‘Diverting and never less than expertly crafted’ Guardian

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Guillermo Del Toro was born in Guadalajara, Mexico and made his feature directorial debut in 1995 with the film Cronos, and has since gone on to direct Mimic, The Devil’s Backbone, Blade II, Hellboy I, Hellboy II, and Pan’s Labyrinth, which garnered enormous critical praise worldwide and won three Academy Awards.

Chuck Hogan is the author of several accaimed novels, including The Standoff and Prince of Thieves, which won the 2005 Hammet Award. Retitled The Town, the film version stars Ben Affleck, Rebecca Hall and John Hamm.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Susman VINE VOICE on 19 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback
Possible Spoilers

If you are looking for another Vampire Diaries - well this is the wrong book for you!

This book one of a trilogy of novels by Guillermo del Toro and crime novelist Chuck Hogan. The Strain tracks a group of humans as they battle the spreading vampire blight which arrived in New York City on a Boeing 777 from Germany, after a routine landing it is found on the runway at JFK airport, with no power and initially no living passengers. What follows is almost definitive Vampire tale where there is no ambiguity over whether there is real evil or not - here humanity fights for survival, there is no seduction process and no romance in this lore. Here the Vampires, also known as strigoi have stinger-like appendages in their throats that shoot out when attacking - at the expense of having any vocal cords. As time moves on their bodies start deteriorating into grotesque, inhuman, zombie-like creatures.

The vector for the transmission of the vampiric pathogen are little worm like creatures that are carried in the pus-like white blood of the strigoi, which can exist outside their host bodies for a time - so even if a human kills a vampire, they can still become infected through contact with just one of these worms. This feature adds a dangerous new dimension to this strain of vampirism. Your usual suspects are here too, such as a Van Helsing type character in the form of an Eastern European Émigré and Holocaust survivor. With his is own rather spooky backstory. You have two Scientists who find that this is no ordinary viral/pandemic and soon come to realize there are darker and older forces on earth at work here. As always the powers that be, i.e.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Oct. 2011
Format: Hardcover
Whilst I have enjoyed the other two titles by Guillermo and Chuck, I sadly have to say that this one was a real let down, it was mainly pure action, had no real reasoning behind it and whilst it would have made an acceptable film in this format it was sadly lacking.

Add to this poor description and a storyline that picks up two years later that should have had more happening and it felt rather like filler rather than a book that had any real merit leaving me thinking that the duo would have been better leaving the series as a duology instead. Finally add to this rather poor characterisation, dire prose and a story that didn't make any real sense and it was sadly a mishmash I'd rather have missed.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Joao Cardeira Jorge on 3 Mar. 2014
Format: Paperback
After the disaster that was the second book it was almost impossible to salvage anything in what became a mess of a plot. It was with little hope I picked up “The Night Eternal”, expecting little more than at least a satisfying conclusion amidst the train wreck the trilogy had become. Unfortunately not even that the authors were able to provide.
The book is a boring, unimaginative, slow and annoying drag. After getting rid, in the second part, of the best character, the one who held the plot and the characters together and formed the best rivalry with the villain, the authors still managed to make the remaining, weak and uninteresting characters... worse. Yes, the story takes place two years after the second book ends. We're in full apocalypse now. Society has crumbled, the world is ruled by vampires and humans are slaves, used only for harvesting their blood. You might think during that time our heroes had been hard at work, fighting against the vampire rule, forming an underground resistance, maybe getting ready to take the fight to those evil bloodsuckers. Well you would be wrong. Nothing has happened. Our protagonist, the most boring hero of all time, Eph, is still crying over his miserable existence and getting drunk... and high... and involved a deeply compelling... love triangle in the middle of the vampire apocalypse. Never mind that no hints to this was ever in the other books. Who cares right? Anyway apparently the other two members of the resistance, spent the two years falling in love! How sweet! Oh and the final member of the resistance just killed lots of vampires “guerrilla style”. What did he accomplish? Well not much but at least he was... well, killing vampires.
So where to start? Its all bad really.
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By Sam Tyler on 18 Sept. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I always have misgivings about starting a trilogy as you never know after all the time you have put into reading the books that the finale will be worth the effort. In the case of ‘The Strain’ trilogy by Chuck Hogan and Guillermo del Toro, the third book has a great ending, but the 400 pages leading up to it almost makes you want to give up. Set a couple of years after the events of ‘The Fall’, ‘The Night Eternal’ follows Eph et al as they deal with a world almost completely covered in shadow as the vampires have inherited the Earth.

This all sounds very exciting and at times it is. The destroyed New York in which our heroes struggle to survive under the ever watchful eye of the Master is well realised. The vampires themselves continue to be as gross and as off-putting as ever. The issue is not with the setting, but the momentum and the characters.

Eph has always been the main focus of the book and his relationships with his son, his turned wife and his lover have always been part of the fabric of the book. However, two years on and he is a basket case with little to no redeeming features, yet we are still forced to follow his pitiful story. Not only do we follow it, but it feels like there is more emphasis on relationships than ever before. The earlier books mixed the main story up with small vignettes on other unfortunates – this really helped alter the pace and flesh out the world.

Now it appears that del Toro and Hogan want to finish the book concentrating on the main group and when they are as wet as Eph, this is no good thing. This book begins to drag as Eph once again ponders about his family, or fights against his addictions, or reflects on a lover he has no chance of getting. Can someone please tell him that in the vampire apocalypse there are more important things to worry about. Whilst you are at it, can you tell the authors too?
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