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The New English Kitchen: Changing the Way You Shop, Cook and Eat Paperback – 18 Apr 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 468 pages
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate; Reprint edition (18 April 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007156596
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007156597
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.6 x 22.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 760,053 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

'At last, a fresh voice in the kitchen.' Nigel Slater

'An exceptional new cookbook.' Sunday Telegraph

'A timely book with a practical and economical approach to sourcing top-quality, locally produced food.' Evening Standard

'A cookbook with a difference. I instantly warmed to its readability, fierce intelligence and admirable sense of economy.' The Independent

'In its particular combination of pleasure and principle, The New English Kitchen can claim to be a subtly transformative work.' TLS

About the Author

Rose Prince is an acclaimed food writer who regularly contributes to the Daily Mail and other national papers and magazines. This book is inspired by her family, her own upbringing around food and her husband, food journalist and recyclist Dominic Prince.


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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A. M. Douglas on 2 Sept. 2006
Format: Hardcover
It's the economics bit of this book I like the most. How to get the most out of, say, a chicken carcass - how to plan your meals and portions - where to buy - how many meals you'll get. It's more a philosophy of kitchen management with explanation of foods and some basic recipes thrown in. One can see it as the basis of a way of getting good real food, all the time, for less cost. Combined with other ideas like using farmers markets and co-operatives, together with, say, some inventive ideas for meals, it could be a really good way of spending less, eating great food and having some quality kitchen time.
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60 of 63 people found the following review helpful By PoppySeed on 20 Mar. 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderful book. It covers not just a wonderful collection of 'basic', useful recipes to help you cook everyday and week to week, it also covers good shopping, and the difference between the different options - e.g. free-range and organic meat. One of the most useful aspects is the list of options for using up leftovers that goes with almost every recipe.
If you like such writers as Nigella Lawson, this is a must-have.
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69 of 74 people found the following review helpful By Mrs Curzon Tussaud on 9 Mar. 2005
Format: Hardcover
Undoubtedly the best cookery book to have come out this year, and that'll still be true at Christmas. Rose's writing combines passion and sensibility, and the Shopping Guide alone is worth the purchase price, which, at Amazon, is merely the price of 14 sliced supermarket loaves. The layout is pleasing, and there are no recipe photos (which tend to date the text) but the book is unwilling to lie open on the table (note to publishers: cook books are working manuals). Usually one finds a mere handful of tempting recipes in a new book; this one has many non-tricksy uncontrived ones which are just the food one longs to cook and eat.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. King on 30 July 2007
Format: Hardcover
I have had this book for a year, I love it actually, although not so much for the recipes - many of which are not particularly to my taste , but because it really has changed the way I shop, cook and eat. I now keep chickens, make my own bread and stock (which is perfectly tasty) and buy most of my meat and veg from local farm shops, which makes fantastic economic sense- because if you follow Rose's advice to the letter it really is cheaper if you buy meat locally at source and in bulk and far tastier, and local vegetables tend to be much fresher.
The book gives you plenty of ideas more than anything, and forces you to think about your food a bit more, which is a good thing. Perhaps it is a bit preachy but it really is about time we stopped relying on supermarkets quite so much,try it - it does take a bit more forethought and planning to do things this way, but you won't look back.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. Williams on 9 Jan. 2008
Format: Hardcover
Rose Prince's book combines exciting recipes with excellent advice on buying and using good quality ingredients. She tackles issues such as intensive farming and the dominance of supermarkets in the UK, offering practical advice on how to eat economically without sacrificing quality and welfare. This book should be read by those that claim not to be able to afford good quality food. A revolution in shopping and eating habits.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By dorrismorris on 29 Aug. 2011
Format: Hardcover
Heard about this book from a radio interview with the author when it first came out, and being an avid believer in the same principles as Rose Prince, I bought it eagerly with high expectations. However, I was very disappointed when I tried out some of the recipes and discovered that they were very plain, not very inspiring, the lack of photographs makes it very dry reading and many of the recipes have ingredients that can only be bought from specialist outlets in major cities like London and Manchester. Living in the "sticks" (the Staffordshire Moorlands), and growing my own veg. and keeping my own chickens and ducks means that access to these markets is limited. I will occasionally dip into this book as a reference tool but a far better book is Sarah Raven's Garden Cookbook. Now that is inspiring!
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jon D VINE VOICE on 21 Mar. 2007
Format: Hardcover
It would be fair to state that we collect cookery books (we cook semi-professionally) and that we are also very interested in food politics & production. So this book really should fit nicely onto the shelf, but it doesn't.

The problem is that the collection of recipies contained herein is nothing particularly spectacular while the writing on "food issues" is really too shallow to be of much interest. For the latter, the works of Fearnley-Whittingstall, Collin Tudge, Felicity Lawrence, Graham Harvey et al are a far better bet. With regards to the former...well, that's a matter of taste, but there are many, many better recipe books in print than this. There really is no joy of eating in this book, and the editing makes the book very difficult to read if one is simply looking for something to cook.

I don't exactly regret handing over my hard-earned for this book, but I won't be seeking out any more by the same author (unless they uniformly get five-star reviews on this august site!). If you're an enthusiast of food writing in general this book might provide a small amount of interest. If, on the other hand, you can get through life with three cookery books, this need not be one of them.
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