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The New Atlas of World History: Global Events at a Glance (Historical Atlas) Hardcover – 3 Oct 2011


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Thames and Hudson Ltd; First Edition edition (3 Oct. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0500251851
  • ISBN-13: 978-0500251850
  • Product Dimensions: 28 x 2.8 x 32 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 109,323 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

`An excellent point of reference'
--BBC History Magazine

'An outstanding cartographic portrayal of events, places and people' --Oxford Times

'Entertaining reading ... An invaluable account of history from a global perspective that helps to explain the synchronicity of well-known events'
--Geographical Magazine

A brave venture in compressing a great deal into a relatively small volume. --Contemporary Review

From the Back Cover

"Haywood presents a unique, global portrait of human history over six million years. A combination of brilliant design, clear narrative, and fascinating insights creates a compelling and evenhanded tapestry of the human experience. Everyone interested in our past will find this a compelling atlas for their bookshelves."--Brian Fagan, professor emeritus, University of California, Santa Barbara

"This comprehensive and innovative atlas covers the entire span of human history, paying particular attention to population expansion, cross-cultural contact, and growing economic and social complexity. Its lively text and accessible format show how people have interacted with their environment to create the world we know today."--Peter H. Wilson, author of Europe's Tragedy: A New History of the Thirty Years War

"This is an outstanding volume, which succeeds admirably in avoiding an over-emphasis on the history of Europe and America. This is true world history. The range of this book is remarkable. It illustrates the history of societies from Asia to America and from Africa to Europe with skill and erudition, covering the unexpected as well as providing new insight into more familiar areas."--Michael Prestwich, professor emeritus of medieval history, Durham University

"An astonishing concept, brilliantly carried through, history and geography seamlessly combined."--John Julius Norwich, author of The Middle Sea: A History of the Mediterranean

"History at the world level is both opportunity and challenge. The New Atlas of World History wonderfully shows the possibilities provided by the global account while avoiding the pitfalls of bias. An excellent introduction to global history."--Jeremy Black, University of Exeter

"A model of accuracy, accessibility, and aesthetics, this comprehensive graphic overview of world history is an indispensable foundation for aficionados and scholars alike."--Dennis Showalter, Colorado College

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By S. J. Williams TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Nov. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book attempts quite a bold brief: 'Global Events at a Glance'. And in many ways it achieves that goal quite effectively. Essentially a combination of pages of illustrated timelines interleaved with the 54 global maps positioned chronologically within the text, the book makes an interesting browse. The maps show types of human subsistence, technological development, migrations, trade patterns, empires and dominions, religious and political affiliations, alliances etc and flicking through one can easily see the ebb and flow of political power and other elements in human cultures. The running world population graph at the bottom of selected timeline pages is fascinating (estimated population falling significantly post Black Death ravages, for example) and biggest 5 cities chart which accompanies each of the maps immediately illustrates our Euro, and then western-centric attitudes. Eastern cities which I often haven't heard of dominate for centuries. There are also two pages of reference maps at the end showing key cities and with 5 inset enlarged views. There is an A-Z of Peoples and Nations and substantial index.

The timelines are divided into 4 bands: Politics and Economy; Religion and Philosophy; Science and Technology; Arts and Architecture: these seem to be colour-coded to link with the map which precedes the timeline. There is a mass of information: for example, in Religion and Philosophy between 1600 and 1610 I can quickly see significant events occured in China, Japan, the Mughal empire and Macassar, though I struggle to see where Macassar is shown on the map, or how the colour used ties in with the information, unless the colour is decorative, in which case it is really confusing.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Persona Synthetic TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 14 Dec. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
A good book that endeavours to encapsulate world history and significant world events from the pre-ice age 6 million years ago (yep, the world is more than 5 thousand years old!) to the present day (2010)
The format of the book is that the world map is laid bare over two pages with countries/continents colour coded according to various criteria eg European colonialism, migrating populations etc. This is followed by a two page timeline which details significant events in the years preceeding and following the year presented in the world map overview with text and illustrations.
Both the world map pages and timeline incorporate a left hand side synopsis column explaining the events as shown.
Obviously the point of the book was to have an entire world map on display for each year depicted but I personally prefer the format utilised by other guides whereby just the pivotal countries are focused upon. I thought the inclusion of the whole globe each time was a bit distracting and took up unneccessary space from regions directly impacted upon having the rest of the unaffected globe presented decade after decade largely unchanged. Sometimes things seemed a bit crammed in due to limitations on space.
I also thought the format of the two page timeline was quite confusing, the colours, years, interplaced sentences gave me quite a headache trying to focus upon it. It has at first glimpse a disorganised random feel to it (it's not) and I felt it could have been laid out asthetically much more pleasing to the eye.
What it presents on a global sense it presents very well though and it also has a nice index including a good section on 'Peoples, Nations and Cultures; it was all just a little bit too over encompassing and generalist compared to other similar books for me.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Sussex by the Sea VINE VOICE on 24 Nov. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This atlas of World History is a bit of a one-trick pony. Whether you think it a worthwhile book depends very much on what you think of the trick.

The selling point of the atlas is that it shows the whole world on each of its 56 maps, and this enables you to see what was happening anywhere in the world at the time the map represents. The late arrival of humans to Madagascar or New Zealand becomes very obvious, and the myriad of vanished pre-Colombian civilisations in the Americas are made quite clear.

However, this approach causes a number of limitations. Firstly large parts of the map do not change over the years: most of Canada, for example, has the words "Sub-Arctic caribou hunters" on it for the vast majority of the 56 maps. This is true, of course, but it's also something that takes up a lot of space, and probably doesn't need to be said 45 times.

Secondly, each physical area is only a single colour, almost always representing the country or lifestyle that is predominant in the area. This makes the information about any location a simple binary one: it is either one thing, or something else, and conveys only a small amount of knowledge. Visually it is interesting, but it doesn't tell you very much. The scale of the world also means that small countries cannot be both seen and named, and by the twentieth century there are usually between 30 and 50 numbered sections on each map.

Finally, every second set of pages in the book is a timeline of contemporaneous world history. This isn't as interesting as the maps, and its hard to escape the wish that there were a greater number of maps and fewer timeline pages.

The pages on migration, religion, and trade were the most interesting to me - but those who haven't spent time with other more detailed historical atlases may find this a well-designed introduction.
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