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The Neon Handshake
 
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The Neon Handshake

1 Mar 2003 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 6.47 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
3:44
2
2:33
3
3:34
4
3:04
5
4:02
6
3:03
7
3:20
8
3:26
9
3:01
10
5:31
11
3:08
12
3:44


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 3 Feb 2003
  • Release Date: 3 Feb 2003
  • Label: Parlophone UK
  • Copyright: 2003 Parlophone Records Ltd. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2003 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 42:10
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001IMUWPM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 50,668 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr. H. Watkinson on 12 Nov 2004
Format: Audio CD
There are few words that can do justice to an album of such magnitude. Without a doubt the two stand-out tracks are 'I can climb mountains' and 'You drove me to it.' Each of these is a near perfect three-or-so minutes of British post-hardcore. If you thought Hundred Reasons were good then you are missing out on this far superior band. I challenge you to walk down any street listening to this album without walking tall with the kind of militant positivity that this band generate. There is no filler on 'The neon handshake'. Although the lyrics are intelligent the combination of this with the musical simplicity makes for one of the most inspirational and simultaneously ignored albums of our time. Much of the beauty lies in the simplicity of the musical structure of the album - littered with dropped-d tunings and tight drumming. The epiphany of this album is located from 2.12 to the end of 'You drove me to it' - 'they won't break me' is all the prospective listener needs to know about the evolution of the two former Symposium members and the attitude that they engender in their listeners.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "stevendixon" on 27 Feb 2003
Format: Audio CD
Having heard their name fluttered about the music scene I awaited this debut with baited breath. Hailed as this year's Hundred Reasons, Hell is for Heroes are a no-nonsense rock outfit. The comparisons with Hundred Reasons are obvious, their breed of rock being fairly hard but with a refreshing British, almost indie-like edge.
The Neon Handshake is a step on from the HR album Ideas Above Our Station, the riffs are more intelligent, the chaos more subtle and the melodies are, well, more delicate and run deeper than simple riffing. HIFH's frontman has the same tendancy to scream as much as he sings, a la Colin Doran but his voice is stronger than the Hundred Reasons vocalist, rarely (if ever) faltering. The biggest difference to me is that HIFH are a much tighter band rhythmically. It seems their drummer is of a different class, and although the style of rock is different, it is worth comparing HIFH's rhythm section with that of the Deftones and A Perfect Circle. Even the production seems more suiting to the style, the Neon Handshake maintaining beautiful sonic balance whilst retaining the rawness of heavy rock, for example the ring on the snare drum really adds to the whole mood a dynamic of the song. This is all epitomised by the excellent single 'You Drove Me to It'.
There are some standout tracks here. 'Night Vision' borrows Placebo-esque drive and soaring melody, combining it with Deftones-like heaviness. 'I Can Climb Mountains' is arguably the album's best, fusing delicate chiming melody with all the angst and pure adrenaline of a Hundred Reasons track. 'Cut Down' and 'Few Against Many' are reasonable tracks, but amongst songs of such quality they seem a little lacklustre. This album exudes class, passion and ability from every pore.
The Neon Handshake is a thoroughly satisfying album to listen to. Although the lack of true originality means that this debut wont change the face of music, the material is brilliantly fresh. This is one to turn up loud...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "scarfo__" on 11 Feb 2003
Format: Audio CD
Oh no. Not another this-years-biggest-thing.
Lots and lots were promised by this band. Symposium briefly rocked the western world, and when Hell is for Heroes began to tour, memories of that band came back.
So what to expect? More middle of the road guitar chunter with maybe one or two good songs (See also Hundred Reasons) or maybe some hardcore off the rails expressway-2-yr-skull rage (See also The Icarus Line). The reality, however, is so much more...
The stunningly names quintet bring much more to the table than their predecessors. With a couple of members in common with the 'Posium, the powerful crunching riffage is, of course, abundant, but it's the other ingredients which make this album so indispensable. The stunningly simple live opener Slow Song exemplifies the Hell is for Heroes sound, drifting from mellow, floating melody to crunching, violent peaks and back again.
The same can be said of stand out track Sick/Happy. This song shows other bands how to do the soft-hard-soft thing with stlye, originalty and, take note InMe, power and feeling. The hardest thing to believe about this song is that it was the first ever written by the band.
A special mention must go to Out Of Sight, for being one of the most powerful songs put on record since The Icarus Line told us to 'Feed A Cat to your Cobra'.
The singles are, in the most part, stunning. You Drove Me To It and I Can Climb Mountains are two of the most addictive and driving peieces of pure RoCk you are likely to hear this year, but the song Night Vision is relatively weak. That said, its still a stunning tune, just lacks the flair of the rest of the album.
Before we talk too much about the vitriol and power of this album, we have to rember the melodic side.
Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By sean irwin on 4 Feb 2003
Format: Audio CD
A highly anticapated album, 'The neon handshake' by hell is for heroes, is a brilliant debut album from a leading post-hardcore quintet from london. Recorded in america, th band have done one of the best albums of 2003. Stand out tracks include the first single, 'I can climb mountains' and 'You drove me to it'. All i can say is after hearing this album,i wanted more. Hell is for heroes have thrown everything they got at you, and their hard work has paid off. A must buy for all post-hardcore fans.
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