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The Nearest Exit Hardcover – 1 Oct 2010

49 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Corvus (1 Oct. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848875991
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848875999
  • Product Dimensions: 16.6 x 3.7 x 24.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 838,989 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

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Product Description

Review

Praise for "The Nearest Exit""The "Nearest Exit" should take its place among the best of the spy thrillers."--"Associated Press"""The Nearest Exit", a terrific second installment in Olen Steinhauer's 'Tourist' spy series about Milo Weaver . . . [His] company is at least as valuable to the series' appeal as is his flair for international trickery."--Janet Maslin, "The New York Times""[Steinhauer's] descriptions of European cities and their residents are full of life. But Weaver is the novel's gem. . . . In many ways, this is a classic spy novel, but it's Weaver's angst that lifts the book to a compelling level of freshness."--"USA Today""Steinhauer delivers another winner in "The Nearest Exit", a spy novel that asks deeper questions about the price we extract from individuals in the pursuit of the so-called greater good."--"Los Angeles Times"""The Nearest Exit", Steinhauer's follow-up novel, reprises the themes of "The Tourist" with even more success. . . . Like le Carre's George Smiley, Weaver is a richly imagined creation with a scarred psyche and a complex backstory that elevates him above the status of run-of-the-mill world-weary spook."--"The New York Times Book Review" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Olen Steinhauer was born in America and has lived in Croatia, the Czech Republic and Italy. He also spent a year in Romania on a Fulbright grant, an experience that helped inspire his first five books. He has now settled in Hungary with his wife and daughter. His first book, The Bridge of Sighs, was nominated for five major thriller awards.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Tim62 VINE VOICE on 1 Nov. 2011
Format: Paperback
I am a big fan of Olen Steinhauer, and I really wanted to like this book. In the end, unfortunately I didn't. I don't think this is Steinhauer's best work. Actually, calling it an 'airport thriller' is spot on, because the one feature of life as a CIA hitman/woman or 'tourist' (I did like that joke) is that you are always travelling. So the main character Milo Weaver spends a lot of time going through airports, hotels, departure lounges, railway stations etc - always on the move but never in one place for very long.

I came to Steinhauer's work through his series of spy novels on his unnamed East European country; Bridge Of Sighs, The Confession, Liberation Movements, Victory Square and 36, Boulevard Yalta or The Vienna Assignment (as published in the UK). All of these are wonderfully-nuanced books and the best of them are right up there with Le Carre and others. Bruno Sev has to be one of the best characters in spy fiction.

But the Milo Weaver series (of which this is number 2) is written as a much more commercial Lee Childs/'Bourne Ultimatum' type thriller.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By atticus on 23 May 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
i am a fan of Steinhauer. I have read all of his books after accidentally discovering Brano Sev last year. However, I must say that the last section of this book falls short of expectation. I couldn't work out who is the narrator and the actual action feels like a speeded up version of a board game. Senator Erwin's charecter is blown out of proportions and is unnecessarily complicated at the end. Otherwise, a cracking read with the intrigue and suspense. I love the language and the speed of thought and I also like the awy the auithor seems to trust the reader to understand the sub plots and side issues.
Definitely recommend this book to all my friends.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jim Gardner on 18 Sept. 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Downloaded this after having read his previous book, The Tourist, which features the same character Milo Weaver. I found the book gripping, particularly the last section as the story reaches its climax, and couldn't put it down ending up with a rather long lie in on a Sunday morning! Interesting characters and a plot that demands your attention (not a book for a casual read). Can't wait for his next book and I'll be looking at his back catalogue to see what else he has written as I understand there were several before The Tourist.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Roger Cave on 1 Dec. 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the first book from this author I have read, and I have tosay I really enjoyed it.

Yes, there are a few confusing bits at the beginning, as the opening chapter or two are a little misleading, but once you get past that (and realise it's the basis for the story), it becomes a good solid espionage tale.

Milo Weaver is a Tourist (it'll explain what it means in the book), a secret branch of the CIA and he gets jobs that he dopens't even want to complete. He has dark secrets, a poor attitude, and low self worth, but as in the majority of these type of books, his hearts in the right place (sort of).

So Milo travels all over Europe to try and uncover a mole in his department, but there are smoke and mirrors everywhere.

The plot is a good premise, the story well told (except for the confusing bit at the beginning) and the actual twists are very well thought out and put into practice.

I think the author is about to release a second book, not sure what it's called, but I may very well give it a go, as this was a really good spy novel.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By gerryg VINE VOICE on 1 Jan. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I agree with the publicity blurb that this author, previously unknown to me, is up there with Le Carre. The main character is George Smiley-esque, with a similar loyalty and similar disquiet for the job he does. The plot is as intricately and carefully woven as a Le Carre and until the late arrival of a plot assisting impossible technology gadget, I would have said as good as Le Carre. The gadget felt like an afterthought to provide fast paced narrative if the book made it into a film as it would have been relatively easy to do a Le Carre "this is what happened" rather than a "this is what is happening".

Apart from that point, the flow of the story involving undercover agencies from the USA, Germany and China was compelling and absorbing, largely concerning a Karla type character (Xin Zhu) undermining and "liquidating" the USA ops with a slow reveal of his personal motives all delivered so credibly. The personal story of the main character with his troubled conscience and troubled family life was also very well done. I particularly liked the exploration of the origins of his relationship with his wife. With echoes of all Le Carre stories, was this all going end with personal bleakness too?

To reveal that would be a plot spoiler but it's definitely worth reading the book to find out. I felt the author took the wrong decision.
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