FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Name of War has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good clean copy with no missing pages might be an ex library copy; may contain marginal notes and or highlighting
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Name of War Paperback – 27 Apr 1999

3.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£15.99
£4.54 £4.54
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£15.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Books (27 April 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375702628
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375702624
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 2 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,548,321 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
First Sentence
In the late, chilly days of January 1675, John Sassamon set out for Plymouth. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Three centuries ago, New England Native Americans were forced into war with the English colonists who had been gradually destroying the native economy by stealing their land, interfering with their hunting, fishing, and farming, etc. The resulting war, known as King Philip's War, decimated the English population and very nearly rid New England of whites entirely. English technology and European diseases ultimately won out over theWampanoags and their allies; there was never again an "Indian threat" in New England. "The Name of War" recounts the struggle as told in English accounts; official documents, diaries, and letters. Author Jill Lepore makes the point that history is always written by the victor. What makes the retelling of King Philip's War so one-sided is the fact that the conquered, the Native American tribes, had no written language in which to tell their side of the story. Very few natives of that time could read or write English and, if they left any accounts of the war, they have never been discovered. Lepore goes on to show that what subsequent generations of Americans thought about the war was based entirely on the writings of the colonists and later, anglo scholars and writers. Their view of the Native American ranged from pagan devil-worshippers, as shown by the Mathers and other early religious leaders, to Noble Savage (Cooper) and finally, Vanishing American (The Curse of Metamora). These attitudes, calcified in books and plays, became the stones upon which later White treatment of Indian nations in other parts of the country were based. The final confrontation at Wounded Knee two hundred years after King Philip's War, had its birth in the earliest chronicles of the seventeent-century.Read more ›
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Our history books continue to present our
country's story in conventional patriotic terms.

America being settled by courageous, white

colonists who tamed a wilderness and the savages in it. With very few exceptions our

pop culture depicts these people who actually

first discovered America and without whose help the colonists would not have survived, as immoral, despicable savages who needed to be removed by killing and shipped out of the country into slavery. And for those few who

remained, they just had to be converted to

Christianity. Jill Lepore tells us there was another side to the story of our native American at the time of the King Philip War, which provokes the reader into asking questions about what the actual relationship between the colonists and the native Americans they found here. More importantly the reader is asked to think about who were these native Americans and why did they fight with the colonists. Lepore's has her own views. The so-called Indians had good cause to be provoked by the colonists and they were trying to send them a message about it. The colonists either didn't get the message, misunderstood the Indians or understood them but didn't care. Lepoe presents her subject in a manner which invites her readers to make their own interpretations of what happened in this country between the colonists and the Indians in 1675-76, as well as what manner of people they were and what might this might all mean for us today.. Lepore's treatment of the subject is

just what James W. Loewen said history book's

should be."Lies My Teacher Told Me-Everything

Your American History Textbook Got Wrong."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 19 Jun. 1998
Format: Hardcover
Jill Lepore has written the best ethnohistorical approach to King Phillip's War to date. She attacks many of the traditional myths of the 'savage Indian'; in their place, she describes the Native American on equal terms with the Puritan Euro-Americans. The resulting anaylisis shed light on both cultures -and the resulting synthesis culture when arose because of Euro-Native contact.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book, by presenting a little studied war in our colonial days, shines a brilliant spotlight on many of our concepts of ourselves, our destiny, and our frequent ability to ignore reality in the justification of our actions. A well written book about the time between the 'Pilgrims' and the 'Colonials' that we have all heard about in school. Very worthwhile reading!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback