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The Music That Died Alone
 
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The Music That Died Alone

2 Oct. 2006 | Format: MP3

£5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £13.75 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:28
30
2
3:27
30
3
3:05
30
4
4:03
30
5
1:18
30
6
0:49
30
7
1:14
30
8
3:38
30
9
3:21
30
10
3:03
30
11
1:41
30
12
7:10
30
13
1:38
30
14
4:45
30
15
2:38
30
16
3:43
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 29 Sept. 2006
  • Release Date: 2 Oct. 2006
  • Label: Century Media Records Ltd
  • Copyright: (c) 2003 InsideOut Music. All rights reserved
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:01
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0034XF8FW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 33,230 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dave & Gwen Grinnell on 8 May 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Andy Tillison is a very talented man. He's a keyboard wizard worthy of comparison with some the old prog giants. He's an inventive and interesting songwriter. But I'm not as keen on his singing, which sounds like a cross between a nightclub crooner and a not very good Peter Hammill impersonator, to me. I still really like this album, but it could have been an absolute classic with a better, less mannered, singer, in my view.

Also, I do wish that the CD had been 4 long songs, rather than being split into loads of smaller tracks.

My comments are meant to be constructive criticism, rather than spiteful. And I really do still like this album and think Tillison is one of the more gifted people playing prog - great band on this CD as well, with David Jackson from VdGG.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "r-l-baker" on 18 Oct. 2004
Format: Audio CD
The CD opens with "Darkest Dreams" which is about 20 minutes long and has some great moments. It then moves on to the "Canturbury Sequence", My all time favourite. It is a style I had never listened to before, its Rock with elements of Jazz, but not exactly fusion. Then comes the 7 Minute single song, "Uphill From Here" With 2 different guitarists it makes this piece orignal and enjoyable. The "Music That Died Alone", is last and was my least favourite, but still superb.
After two listens this CD became my favourite for a long time. This is a quality purchase, and one that any fan of progressive music should have in their collection. Intricate arrangements layer every track, supported by some blinding musicianship. Roine Stolt's guitar work really shines on this release, and his vocals are clean and emotive.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Dr. D. B. Sillars VINE VOICE on 23 Mar. 2004
Format: Audio CD
A lot has been said about this in various prog related web sites. So does the hype match the actual album? Yes it certainly does. This is a wonderful collaboration between Roine Stolts’ classic prog style and Andy Tillisons’ more modern approach. The songwriting, playing and production on this is top notch. I am familiar with Andy's work in PO90, but nothing there matches the sophistication and maturity of this recording. The Canterbury Sequence is particularly fun, hearing Stolt doing a valvey Phil Miller, Zoltan being a busy Pip Pyle and Andy vocalising like Richard Sinclair with Hammond like Dave Stewart and synth like Alan Gowen. Great stuff indeed. I believe a second album is being recorded.
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