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The Music of the Bible Original recording reissued


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Product details

  • Audio CD (9 Oct 2000)
  • SPARS Code: ADD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued
  • Label: Musique d'abord
  • ASIN: B00004TVH6
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,060,396 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Psaume 23 'L'Eternal Est Mon Berger'
2. Benediction Sacerdotale (Nombres VI, 22)
3. Psaume 24 'A L'Eternel Appartient La Terre'
4. Cantique Des Cantiques (I, 1)
5. Psaume 6
6. Lamentations (I,1)
7. Psaume 133
8. 'Ecoute, Israel' (Deuteronome VI, 4)
9. Psaume 150 'Alleluia!'
10. Elegie De David (II Samuel I, 19)
11. Psaume 122 'Je Suis Joyeux Lorsqu'on Me Dit...'
12. Psaume 123 'Vers Toi J'Eleve Mes Regards...'
13. Esther (V, 1)
14. Le Buisson Ardent (Exode III, 1)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jacques COULARDEAU on 27 Nov 2007
That music is outstanding in all possible ways, but we cannot agree that it is the melting pot in which European music was born and out of which it evolved. This is the negation of several elements. 1- the separation (both continuation and antagonism) between the Semitic and Indo-Iranian traditions proved archeologically in many ways beyond the simple linguistic separation. The Ancient Testament is full of the rivalry with and against the northern civilization that was going to nurture the Indo-European languages and cultures. 2- This Indo-Iranian tradition, the Avestan tradition for example, is also based on the common identity of the poet and the priest, what some name the professional of language. All sacred texts, as far back as we can go, are poetical texts and they were necessarily recited and sung by the poet thousands of years before being written down and then read by the poet-priest. 3- The Sumerians had 11 string harps and thus knew how to tune them, which can only be done if the sequence of fifths is known: in other words the Indo-European and Hebraic traditions might come from an older common tradition. 4- Christianity was born from the zealot mould of Judaism represented by James, the brother of Jesus, but it took a rift to produce Christianity and that rift came from Saul-Paul, in alliance with Peter, John, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and a few others. And this rift was the dropping of the Hebraic language, the shift from Aramean to Greek and Latin, the dropping of circumcision and food control. I can't imagine such a rift could have kept the music of an old language or even the modern Aramean version of it when it dropped the language itself and the fundamental rules of the Jewish religion.Read more ›
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5 stars for its importance, 4 for its performance 1 Feb 2001
By John Wheeler - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
The Psalms and songs of the Bible are of course well-known to all Bible students. What is not so commonly known is that all of Hebrew Scripture was originally meant to be sung -- and that to instrumental accompaniment. "Your statutes have been my *zemirot* (songs accompanied by harp or lyre) in the house of my pilgrimage" (Psalm 119:54). The vocal melodies are said to be contained in the "musical accents" (*te`amim*) of the Hebrew Masoretic Text.
Suzanne Haik-Vantoura (d. September 22, 2000) sought to rediscover the original musical meaning of the *te`amim*, which have been given many different musical interpretations by the synagogue communities. Starting from the premise that the *te`amim* are primarily musical (not primarily exegetical as the Masoretes assumed), and using the Hebrew verbal syntax as her "Rosetta Stone" (technically, her "virtual bilingual"), she systematically derived a "deciphering key" capable (for the first time) of explaining all the features of the notation and its relationship to the words. Moreover, she discovered evidence that the *te`amim* (which transcribe a system of hand- and finger-gestures used to conduct music) actually preserve the melodies created by the biblical authors and transmitted along with their own words.
This Harmonia Mundi France recording is the first of eight that have been produced to date. (The others, produced by Alienor, are available only from France or other locations outside the U.S.) It is the shortest, and in some ways the least well-produced, but has the greatest variety of texts for its size. (Modern instruments are used; the instrumental arrangements and choral harmonies are meant to evoke, not to reconstruct, the original settings.) The marvelous renditions of Pss. 23, 24 and 122, plus the Elegy of David, alone make the purchase worthwhile. While there are some transcription errors in some melodies, they do not seriously affect the simple, yet profound character of the arrangements.
This recording (properly called *La musique de la Bible revelee*) originally appeared as an LP in 1976, along with the first edition of the French book of the same title. The LP won a *Diapson d'Or* (Gold Tuning Fork) and other awards in France; the book (2nd ed.), the Prix Bernier from the Institute of France. The English translation of the French book is likewise available ...
For more information on Haik-Vantoura's work (and for answers to questions raised here by other reviewers!), please see my Web site ... Contact information is also available there.
42 of 45 people found the following review helpful
Musically Compelling, But Is It Correct? 7 Aug 2002
By Timothy Dougal - Published on Amazon.com
"The Music of the Bible Revealed" is a fascinating CD, which I bought primarily so I could hear Biblical Hebrew sung at my convenience. Little did I realize the arcane nature of this work. Regarding the notes accompanying the disc, and the other review posted here, though, I am somewhat dubious as the the correctness of the theory by which this music was produced. Vantoura's work was to decipher the markings around the words in the Masoretic text of the Hebrew Bible, I gather in conjunction with the text, as music, that is notatable in the modern style. This is pretty far out. Perhaps even farther out is the notion that these markings represent the actual music sung at the temple in Jerusalem prior to 70 CE. This theory, however, overlooks one very important fact. The oldest Hebrew Biblical texts we have, from Qumran, written while the temple was operating, and for a little while after, possess neither vowel markings nor what are now generally considered cantillation marks. These marks appear, along with the vowel marks, only in Medieval manuscripts. Early Medieval Christian music was signified in a similar manner, with markings above the Latin text, which are now poorly understood. A Benedictine music professor of mine suggested that these were memnonic devices as part of an essentially oral transmission process. To me it seems more likely than not, that the marking of the Masoretic text were part of a similar development, and not inherent in the original composition of the text. Transformation of the MT into music seems like a typically Kabbalistic enterprize.Whatever the truth is, however, this disc is very interesting. Many of the chants are unaccompanied, some utilize a spare harmonic choir and instrumentation. The music sounds as Medieval as Middle Eastern, and resembles the music of Machaut at times. The performance is solid, and well-recorded, but never quite inspired. Still, an intriguing CD
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Was Sumerian music the common melting pot? 27 Nov 2007
By Jacques COULARDEAU - Published on Amazon.com
That music is outstanding in all possible ways, but we cannot agree that it is the melting pot in which European music was born and out of which it evolved. This is the negation of several elements. 1- the separation (both continuation and antagonism) between the Semitic and Indo-Iranian traditions proved archeologically in many ways beyond the simple linguistic separation. The Ancient Testament is full of the rivalry with and against the northern civilization that was going to nurture the Indo-European languages and cultures. 2- This Indo-Iranian tradition, the Avestan tradition for example, is also based on the common identity of the poet and the priest, what some name the professional of language. All sacred texts, as far back as we can go, are poetical texts and they were necessarily recited and sung by the poet thousands of years before being written down and then read by the poet-priest. 3- The Sumerians had 11 string harps and thus knew how to tune them, which can only be done if the sequence of fifths is known: in other words the Indo-European and Hebraic traditions might come from an older common tradition. 4- Christianity was born from the zealot mould of Judaism represented by James, the brother of Jesus, but it took a rift to produce Christianity and that rift came from Saul-Paul, in alliance with Peter, John, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and a few others. And this rift was the dropping of the Hebraic language, the shift from Aramean to Greek and Latin, the dropping of circumcision and food control. I can't imagine such a rift could have kept the music of an old language or even the modern Aramean version of it when it dropped the language itself and the fundamental rules of the Jewish religion. I do not say the Judaic tradition has not passed in a way or another into the European Christian tradition, but there are other traditions and sources behind European music that we would be badly inspired to neglect. And I would be very cautious in considering the similarity between 16th century madrigals and Hebraic psalms. First we may be exporting our culture retrospectively into the Hebraic tradition. Second a similarity is not a proof of filiation. Two traditions can produce some similar forms, or one tradition can re-invent or re-discover something another tradition had discovered or invented millennia before. The hypothesis of a filiation is interesting though and has to be explored along with other hypotheses.

Dr Jacques COULARDEAU, University Paris Dauphine, University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne & University Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
La Musique de la bible revelee 14 May 2007
By E. W. Brascamp - Published on Amazon.com
It is very intriguing to listen music which is claimed to be reconstructed from writings in the margin of old biblical text. And the music is sounding authentic and modern at the same time.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Well Done 10 Feb 2013
By sharris53 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
The LORD's good work through the faithful. Follow His desire for your purpose in life and He will reward it.
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