Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Audible Sample
Playing...
Paused

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd Audio Download – Unabridged

4.6 out of 5 stars 225 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Download, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£0.00
Free with your Audible trial
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£2.50

Read & Listen

Switch between reading the Kindle book & listening on the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice.
Get the Audible audiobook for the reduced price of £5.49 after you buy the Kindle book.

Listen on your Kindle Fire or with the free Audible app on Apple, Android, and Windows devices.


Free with Audible trial
£0.00
Buy with 1-Click
£7.43

Sold and delivered by Audible, an Amazon company


Product details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Androo TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 3 Mar. 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is definitely amongst the best Agatha Christie novels I've read, and it feels even better in this lovely 'new' facsimile edition. The novel caused a stir (relatively speaking) at the time because it's written in the first person... and particularly for another reason! Read it to find out. The first person narrative feels odd at first, but the narrator is very believable. This is a well structured and complex plot. A semi-retired Poirot is looked at from a different angle, but he is just as effective and there are some nice set pieces - in particular the beautifully written 'mah jong' scene that's a joy to read. The denoument is satisfying. Highly recommended.
Comment 21 of 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Agatha Christie's job, as a writer of Detective Novels, was, paradoxically, to hide the criminal - much like a spiv with the card game, Hide the Lady. Even though the punter aims to find the card - and makes wild guesses (based, of course, on superior talents) the side-show spiv will win every time - maybe it's just a trick, a slight of hand, but we come back again and again in the vain hope of putting one over on the expert.

Not much hope, I'm afraid!

`The Murder of Roger Ackroyd' has to be Ms Christie's ultimate deception - it certainly had me fooled right `til the end. No matter where I looked, the Lady was hidden.

Up pop all the usual suspects - and with a Christie you know if someone is accused, it isn't them. One by one she knocks out everyone - and I do mean everyone! Surely she hasn't had a total stranger do the murder?

No, the wrist works it's magic: Poirot, shows you the superiority of his little gray cells and you loose again.

And I can't tell you the secret - I won't spoil the thrill.

What I will say is it is beautifully done.

Agatha Christie manages here to exploit the genre `Detective Novel' in a way which relies on the reader's knowledge of all the usual tricks, of lulling them into a false sense of security and then flipping them onto their backs. It is a book to be read rather than a story to be told - and despite the amazing craftsmanship of Granada television's version with David SuchetPoirot - Agatha Christie's Poirot - The Murder Of Roger Ackroyd [1989], it fails precisely because this is not only a story but an exploration of the relationship between reader and writer.
Read more ›
Comment 7 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Agatha Christie really exercises her ability to write ingenious crime fiction in this story. Featuring the well-known and lovable Hercule Poirot, we follow his attempts to retire peacefully in a country village setting, and see them blown away when a murderer strikes. As usual, Christie deceives the reader in a most satisfactory way, which is perhaps the most I should say about it. Immensely enjoyable, and the reader should find him or herself reading it over and over again to spot the clues that were missed the first time around.
Comment 6 of 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was my second Agatha Christie book and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

It starts with you wondering what is going on as it is told in the first person. That person lives with his sister, Caroline, a terrible gossip who is always fishing for information and sticking her nose into other people’s affairs. If you dislike gossips, this book is worth reading for the description of her character alone e.g.:

'...The motto of the mongoose family, so Mr Kipling tells us, is: “Go and find out.” If Caroline ever adopts a crest, I should certainly suggest a mongoose rampant. One might omit the first part of the motto. Caroline can do any amount of finding out by sitting placidly at home…'.

Christie doesn’t let up – Caroline appears throughout the book and the descriptions of her are pithy.

In this book, Poirot is semi-retired. A murder unfolds and there are two oddities – two things that don’t make any sense. One of them is that the murder scene has been slightly changed. “Surely it isn’t important?” says one of the characters to Poirot. Poirot replies: “It is completely unimportant. That is why it is so interesting”. For the rest of the book, you are left trying to figure out why it might be important, before Christie’s hallmark ‘grand reveal’ at the end of the book.

I found the mystery intriguing. I also smile at how things have changed since the book was written e.g. ‘It was Friday night, and on Friday night I wind the clocks…’; the arrival of the ‘evening post’; and a number of references to ‘the electric light’ - I find it interesting that back in 1926 when this book was written, they called a ‘light’ an ‘electric light’.

This was listed in the Guardian as one of Christie’s Top 10 books.
Read more ›
4 Comments 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
'The Murder of Roger Ackroyd' is the brightest jewel amongst Agatha Chrisite's crime novels. The plot of the murder is so intricate and complex, yet so logical, that only the brilliant grey cells of Hercule Poirot at their full 'methodical' capacity can allow the reader to comprehend its degree of ingenuity. The suspects are numerous; the entire staff employed at Ackroyd's mansion, his own son as well as his sister in law and her daughter. All possess the equal potential of being the murderer. With Dr.Sheppard substituting the role of Poirot's faithful companion Hastings, the road towards the truth is long but entirely bearable, as Agatha Christie demonstrates why she is the queen of crime, once and for all.
Comment 4 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse