The Mummy Case (Amelia Peabody Book 3) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Mummy Case (Amelia Pe... has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Mummy Case (Amelia Peabody) Paperback – 29 Jun 2006


See all 23 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£1.24
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£2.70 £0.01
£7.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Mummy Case (Amelia Peabody) + Curse of the Pharaohs: second vol in series (Amelia Peabody) + Lion in the Valley (Amelia Peabody)
Price For All Three: £22.37

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: C & R Crime; First printing of this edition edition (29 Jun. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184529386X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845293864
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 25,721 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

I can't wait for the next Peabody story... I really do think [Elizabeth Peters'] books are great entertainment. (Angela Ripon)

A writer so popular that the public library has to keep her books under lock and key.' (Washington Post Book World)

Think Miss Marple with early feminist gloss crossed with Indiana Jones... accomplished entertainment.' (Guardian)

Book Description

The irascible husband of Victorian Egyptologist Amelia Peabody is living up to his reputation as 'The Father of Curses'. Denied permission to dig at the Pyramids of Dahshoor, Emerson is awarded instead the 'Pyramids' of Mazghunah. Nothing in this barren spot seems of any interest, but then a murder in Cairo changes all of that.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Dec. 2000
Format: Paperback
This is the first of Peabody's adventures in which Rameses plays a vital role. Here, we learn how Peabody and Emerson first encountered the Master Criminal, how the Lion came to Chalfont, and how Rameses began his career as an excavator. To me this book works on several levels; with the conflict between religions and cultures, the animal rights theme (courtesy of Rameses) and the introduction of the Master Criminal weaving in and out of the narrative in a manner that makes the story truly three-dee. Rameses is now about five years old and his doting Papa is now willing to risk the dangers of Egypt. John the Footman, comes along to keep an eye on the alarmingly accident prone lad, but fails to prevent Rameses from conducting his own excavations and investigations alongside his Mama and Papa. In the end, however, it is Rameses' talent for languages that solves the case.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. Chippindale TOP 500 REVIEWER on 16 Jun. 2007
Format: Paperback
Elizabeth Peters was born and brought up in Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

The Amelia Peabody books may or may not be an acquired taste, personally I love them. They are set in Victorian times when there were still very strict rules of etiquette and polite behaviour was the norm. Although most of the books are set in Egypt, in the desert under very trying conditions and extremely hot weather the `English' way of life was still expected to be adhered to, sometimes with quite hilarious consequences.

Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters' best loved and brilliant creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her no nonsense dress sense and forthright opinions.

These books are a delight for the reader. Anyone who has not read any of them should start right now. They whisk you back to the days of gentile living. Where everything stops for tea and of course it would be unthinkable for the men not to dress for dinner.

This book is the third in the series and the story takes Amelia to the pyramids at Mazghunah. On their arrival it looks to Emerson and Amelia that the barren area is of little or no interest, but then a murder in Cairo soon persuades the pair otherwise.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Anne S. Jones on 17 July 2009
Format: Paperback
I love the Amelia Peabody books, and have managed to purchase all 18 of them as I can re-read them at any time. They tell the story of Amelia Peabody, her husband Emerson, and son, Ramses. They have all sorts of adventures as Archaeologists in the Egypt of the late 19 C to the early 20's. Elizabeth Peters very cleverly brings Egypt and its people to life and creates the most marvellous characters. They are all so ludicrously believable, mostly because you want to believe in them. If you like the idea of Ancient Egypt, enjoy mysteries and have a wry sense of humour, I thoroughly recommend these books as being the best way of passing pleasurable time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Chippindale TOP 500 REVIEWER on 16 Jun. 2007
Format: Unbound
Elizabeth Peters was born and brought up in Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

The Amelia Peabody books may or may not be an acquired taste, personally I love them. They are set in Victorian times when there were still very strict rules of etiquette and polite behaviour was the norm. Although most of the books are set in Egypt, in the desert under very trying conditions and extremely hot weather the `English' way of life was still expected to be adhered to, sometimes with quite hilarious consequences.

Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters' best loved and brilliant creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her no nonsense dress sense and forthright opinions.

These books are a delight for the reader. Anyone who has not read any of them should start right now. They whisk you back to the days of gentile living. Where everything stops for tea and of course it would be unthinkable for the men not to dress for dinner.

This book is the third in the series and the story takes Amelia to the pyramids at Mazghunah. On their arrival it looks to Emerson and Amelia that the barren area is of little or no interest, but then a murder in Cairo soon persuades the pair otherwise.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By BobH on 16 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback
`The Mummy Case' by Elizabeth Peters (aka Barbara Mertz) is the third in her Amelia Peabody mysteries. I first read it over twenty years ago and subsequently read several others. I have just re-read `The Mummy Case'. It features an Egyptologist, Radcliffe Emerson, his long-suffering wife. Amelia Emerson nee Peabody and their infant prodigy, Walter (aka Ramses)
Firstly the title is brilliant, the best of the whole series. The style is appropriate for that of the autobiography of a late-Victorian woman (as it claims to be). Here's an example:
`As I watched them ride away, the girl a modest distance behind the two men, such indignation flooded my being that I stamped my foot - a frustrating gesture in that region, since the sand snuffled the sound.'
Unlike some of the other reviewers I find the interchange between 5-year-old Ramses and his long suffering parents engaging. Here's an example: (Ramses wants to take a baby lion, he's acquired, for a walk)
`He stood holding the leash, his grave eyes fixed on my face. "I would like to say, Mama, dat I am fully cognizant of your support and forbearance regarding de lion. I will endeavor to find some way of proving my gratitude."
"Please don't," I exclaimed. "I appreciate your remarks, Ramses, but you can best express your gratitude by being a good little boy and obeying your mama's orders."
"Yes, Mama. Good night, Mama. God night, John. Good night, de cat , Bastet. Good night, Papa,"
"Good night, my dearest boy," Emerson replied. "Sleep well."'
Radcliffe Emerson in many ways is the `baby' of the family and his tantrums become tiresome. Here's an example.
`Emerson was cursing in Arabic, and I felt sure the boy was making mental notes of "da colloquial speech".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback