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The Mothman Prophecies Paperback – 7 Mar 2002


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The Mothman Prophecies + Our Haunted Planet + Operation Trojan Horse: The Classic Breakthrough Study of UFOs
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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks; New Ed edition (7 Mar. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340824468
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340824467
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 2.3 x 17.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 97,732 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

A bestseller in America... an account of strange happenings... a dark terror inspired by unearthly noises and mysterious lights overhead. You'll believe it. (Peterborough Evening Telegraph)

A 'supernatural suspense yarn that builds the tension without going into shock-horror' mode. (Candis)

written by an investigator of the paranormal... this is a fascinating book (Huddersfield Daily Examiner)

Keel's meticulous research,wry style and humour make this one a delight.Authentically creeepy. (dreamberry)

Book Description

The terrifying true story of the alien invasion of Point Pleasant, West Virginia: the tie-in edition to the film starring Richard Gere, Laura Linney and Alan Bates

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 Mar. 2002
Format: Paperback
I got this book on the strength of the adverts for the movie that lined bus stops all over my home town. I was pleasantly surprised. The book starts off and sounds like it is going to be all rubbish and analysising, but after the first chapter the events of Point Pleasant makes this book really interesting and easy to read. I would recommend this to anyone whether they are into the paranormal or not. It is an excellent book. A must read and will open your eyes to the weirdness that really does go on on this planet!
I really want to see the film now but it isn't on anywhere. I'll have to wait to rent that!
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "franco900uk" on 28 Jun. 2002
Format: Paperback
To anyone this book would be an enthralling read. To anyone interested in any aspect of the paranormal this is a must read. I have always had a limited interest in the paranormal but as many other people are, I have always been sceptical about alleged sightings. This book however presents what seem to be very unbelievable events in a very believable way.
Being someone who has studied English Literature in the past, I noticed that this book reads very much like fiction, in the way it grabs your attention and I found it almost impossible to put it down. That only adds to the appeal of the book and I would say that it would be ideal for any book worm who fancies reading something a little different from the norm.
If you get the chance whoever you are, then I would suggest you read this and prepare yourself to be amazed and convinced by the experiences of John Keel and all of the seemingly eccentric, but in my opinion, genuine witnesses he met along the way.
A real pleasure to read.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Steve Watson on 7 Sept. 2003
Format: Paperback
Having researched this subject for many years this book is a very good explanation of events. Although not much Mothman is mentioned, the reason is John Keel didn't experience the Mothman personally. This book reflects his experience in Point Pleasant, and he does it very well. I fully recommend the book, its the best documented sighting to date, and well worth a look...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ashtar Command on 24 April 2011
Format: Paperback
John Keel used to be a well known investigator of the paranormal, an investigator of the non-sceptical variety. "The Mothman Prophecies" is his most famous work.

The book has been marketed as the scariest thing ever written, but is actually quite bland compared to the accounts of alien abductions and 2012 apocalypses littering the bookstalls these days. But then, it was originally published in 1975.

Personally, I consider the book to be a major disappointment. Keel comes across as paranoid, a kind of real life Fox Moulder. A mysterious dwarf with an eerie alien voice comes looking for him in West Virginia. The alien dwarf calls Keel in New York. Then, the phone just goes BEEP-BEEP-BEEP. The phone company can find no explanation. And so on. The whole thing is connected to sightings of "mothmen" in the small town of Point Pleasant, West Virginia. Does somebody want to scare him from continuing the investigation? The book contains no real answers, and ends abruptly when the Silver Bridge in Point Pleasant collapses, killing 46 people. At that point, Keel is so paranoid and crazy, that he essentially collapses in front of his TV. There, the story ends.

Unless I'm mistaken, Sceptical Enquirer actually named the mysterious dwarf some years ago. The dwarf was a real person, some kind of practical joker and circus artist who knew Keel personally. Apparently, this very real human being was responsible for many of the "paranormal" phenomena detailed by Keel. He drove poor John mad. Of course, Mr. Dwarf couldn't have been behind the mothmen or the collapse of Silver Bridge.

SO WHO KNOWS WHAT ELSE MIGHT BE LURKING OUT THERE...

Last time I heard about Keel was during the 1990's.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 July 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is a classic of Fortean literature and anyone interested in UFOlogy or the supernatural will find a hugely enjoyable and genuinely scary read.
However, even Keel's most enthusiastic cheerleaders must have some reservations of the accuracy of the reportage. A number of the conclusions that Keel draws are hugely speculative. While the 'aliens' appear able to span intergalactic distances they are also unable to effectively tap phones, dress fashionably or even walk in a straight line.
And no matter how much you love the book, one *must* question the artwork on the cover. A hunky Mothman looks on as a strapping lad pulls hiis buxom lass away from the horrifying apparition. Framed in pea-green. Mmmmmmm!
And a final caveat to all prospective emptors - there is very little prophesy in this book and none from the Mothman himself.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Doc on 23 Jun. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Anyone who professes an interest in the paranormal should read this book.

Keel takes as his subject the sightings of UFOs and mysterious "mothmen" in and around Point Pleasant, West Virginia in the late 1960's culminating in the catastrophic collapse of a road bridge across the Ohio River and the tragic loss of life in the icy waters beneath just before Christmas 1967.

Much of the text consists of rambling and disjointed accounts of UFO encounters (often several different stories are spewed out in the same block of type without any line break, which is rather disconcerting), and it is the sheer number of these encounters which builds up the tension within the book.

Keel then moves on the chronicle the campaign of petty harassment, phone tapping, and encounters with strange "Men in Black" which many of the UFO witnesses (including Keel himself) were subjected to.

But at the heart of the book are Keel's own unique, compelling theories on the UFO phenomenon. These gems are the best written and most interesting parts of the book. Keel is surprisingly sceptical and very much against the grain of conventional paranormal wisdom (is there any such thing?).

Anyway, if you meet someone who claims to be a UFO buff, ask them what they think about Keel's theories. If they look at you with a blank uncomprehending stare, pick up your drink, walk away, and find someone else to talk to, they clearly know nothing about the subject.
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