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The Moses Legacy: The Evidence of History Hardcover – 22 Mar 2002


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Sidgwick & Jackson Ltd (22 Mar. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0283073152
  • ISBN-13: 978-0283073151
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 15.9 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 703,502 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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About the Author

Graham Phillips has investigated unsolved mysteries for over fifteen years. His is the author of Robin Hood - the Man Behind the Mystery, The Search for the Grail, The Marian Conspiracy and the bestselling The Act of God.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By David on 24 Nov. 2005
Format: Paperback
For me, the book makes certain things add up that didn’t seem to add up before. The Moses Legacy doesn’t go about dealing directly with the difficulties of the Old Testament but it pulls on a lot of evidence and ideas gathered from many sources – archaeology in particular. It leaves a lot of questions unanswered but explains how (frustratingly) so much evidence has been destroyed. As a result, many of the arguments are presented as ‘on the balance of probability’, rather than fact. The reader is presented with the evidence that has been found and possible explanations. But these arguments are generally quite convincing possibilities.
The evidence and information gathered by Phillips is presented rather like a thesis. It pulls together the work of many scholars, researchers, archaeologists and makes their research accessible. Although I read the book in a week, I didn’t read it cover to cover. I repeatedly found myself asking, “Hang-on, how does that fit in with what was said in the last chapter?” or ...”on the map section?” and returning to check and compare details with other evidence. Also, “Well I’d like to see the full scroll from which you took that quote.”
The book is a fascinating look at historical and religious events. The result is a story about the beginnings of a ‘One God’ religion that could well be the true story of how all modern ‘One God’ religions began. And 13 Tribes of Israel, rather than 12 answers a few questions but certainly complicates matters as well. How exciting!
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Farevar Rami on 13 Jun. 2002
Format: Hardcover
Whilst this book does indeed have some factual errors.., as well as a few others, they are relatively minor. Nowhere does the author claim an expertise in Hebrew, and any researcher can be betrayed by one of his sources. Finally, most experts in this field do not, in fact, speak fluent Hebrew, let alone fluent Aramaic, but their pronouncements are nevertheless held as divine truth.
I am still reeling from reading this book and the new possibilities it presents.
Whilst the connection between ancient Hebrews and an Egyptian attempt at monotheism has been speculated upon for nearly 60 years, the connection with Edom, which is fully elucidated by a text excluded from the Old Testament, is a very significant advance in the appreciation of the origin of Judaism.
Furthermore, the hypothesis that ancient Judah and Israel were practising different strains of the same religion, the Israelites having an older and more iconic rite, the Judean creed being newer, more fanatical and iconoclastic, offers stunning possibilities in the interpretation of relations between two states, as well as the portrayal of ancient Israel in the Bible (given that it was subsequently written down by its religious rivals).
This hypothesis neatly explains the gaps in the tightly woven substance of the books of Joshua and Judges - and I look forward to reading the "lost" book of Jasher now that I am alerted to its existence.
I am not at all offended by the conjecture in this book. I've read and heard too many professional historians utter complete untruths as if they were physical fact. If you studied Persian, Byzantian or Russian history some twenty years ago, your education is likely to contain considerable distortion according to current teaching.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Karen Varble on 15 July 2004
Format: Paperback
I note with interest that one reviewer questions the findings of this book because of the author's use of the Book of Jasher as a source. I agree that we cannot place too much credence in a source of which so many versions exist. (I believe the one Graham Phillips used is a nineteenth-century translation.) However, most of Mr. Phillips' book compares Bible verses - not the Book of Jasher - with archaeological discoveries to show that the plagues of Egypt really occurred, that Mount Sinai was a real mountain and that Moses was an historical figure. In this respect he has done an excellent job. I may not agree with all his conclusions, but I consider this book to be a milestone in biblical research.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Turner on 30 July 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In many ways the follow up book to Phillips' Atlantis and the Ten Plagues of Egypt (or Act of God by its UK name). I gave this three stars as I feel that this lacked something. I've become a fan of Phillips recently, partly due to his unique brand of historical detection, and his ability to take the reader on an exciting journey of discovery. This book seemed different and lacked the usual excitement.

Phillips' is not a professional historian or biblical scholar, and so his works should be read alongside more scholarly, or academic, works. What Phillips provides is a good "alternative" to the mainstream and gets you thinking and wanting to know more, stirring an interest in difficult subjects.

As the title of the book implies, this is about Moses. However, the reader will be surprised that only one chapter is used to examine Moses' possible identity. I would have liked more on this subject. Phillips argues that he was two men, separated by about a century or so - a priest called Kamose, and Akhenaten's elder brother Tuthmosis. Personally I found this unlikely. If Moses was an Egyptian or part of the establishment then Tuthmosis would be the best bet, but I'm in favour of Moses being an individual Hebrew.

What the book really is about is the origin of God, or the origins of monotheism, specifically the Abrahamic religions.
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