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The Money Culture Paperback – 1 Mar 2011

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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reissue edition (1 Mar. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393338657
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393338652
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2 x 21.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 237,227 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Michael Lewis was born in New Orleans and educated at Princeton University and the London School of Economics. He has written several books including the New York Times bestseller, Liar's Poker, widely considered the book that defined Wall Street during the 1980s. Lewis is contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine and also writes for Vanity Fair and Portfolio magazine. He is married with three children.

Product Description

Review

Journalism of a high order Lewis's insouciance is one of his great charms as a writer, along with a graceful prose style, a mordant wit, and a thorough grounding in the world of finance One of those rare works that encapsulate and define an era. "

Book Description

A modern resissue of a bestselling classic, by the author of Liar's Poker and Pacific Rift. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book

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First Sentence
In 1985, the average income of the ten best paid people on Wall Street rose from $29 million to $51 million, and everyone involved traded in his gold American Express card for platinum. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By DOPPLEGANGER TOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Sept. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Michael Lewis is a most accomplished author with 'stonkin' good business related yarns such as "Liars's Poker", and "The Big Short", under his belt which have been widely acclaimed, well researched, and gripping reads with some considerable substance and 'meat on the bones'.

However, "The Money Culture" originally published in 1991 is different. It is a book of essays following a loosely woven financial thread ranging from his antipathy to American Express, Wall Street, the morality of Michael Milken, Eddie Braverman, perhaps the most unethical share-trader and bouncer of personal cheques of all time, the extremely nasty and tetchy Nabisco takeover bid, gambling on derivatives in London and Paris, the cruel lesson taught to T Boone Pickens on the Tokyo Stock Exchange, and other short essays. Each is an interesting 'cameo' that whips up your interest and then as quickly as it started, dumps you back to earth in a state of unfulfilled curiosity leaving you perhaps at best stirred enough to explore further on the various subjects and people covered. Books such as "Barbarians At The Gate" (by Burrough and Helyar) would certainly satisfy the most intense craving to throw light on the Nabisco takeover affair.

I found the most fascinating and hilarious cameo was the tale of Eddie Braverman, a character who surely would make a wonderful subject for a film of his nefarious financial wheeler dealer scams and his 'Keystone Cops' escapades in avoiding his creditors.

For lovers of collections of essays this book should appeal, to those who like more substance the appeal may not be as great.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By R. P. Wright on 25 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback
Really not a book but just a selection of articles by Lewis, and done before he'd developed his style and learnt a bit more about the World.
The Japanese segments reads really badly in retrospect, criticising Japanese earthquake prooofing for example looks a bit silly given recent events demonstrated how remarkably resilient that nation is.
Anyone English is going to wince on the UK segment too. Lewis has developed into a fantastic author of (IMO) some of the most important books of and for the 21st Century, just not this one!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By abbeybarn on 13 Mar. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lewis suits my style of reading matter have now passed the book on to provide light educational reading where it will be appreciated
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tony Mattson on 26 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very good read full of witty, intelligent essays; excellent style and content match Lewis's longer form novels. Absolutely first rate.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 50 reviews
31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
A Mediocre Anthology 24 July 2001
By Z. Blume - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This collection of previously published articles is at times very funny, insightful, and a good primer on several financial issues that dominated the 1980's, but it can also be repetitive (many of the articles repeat jokes, anecdotes, and some even seem to be slightly altered version of previous articles)and is quite dated since the articles detail financial events and characters of the mid to late 1980's. I learned a fair amount about the savings and loan scandals, leveraged buy outs, and the Japanese economic miracle and collapse, and also enjoyed some amusing tales of financial excess, but I had to read through a lot of less than interesting pages to find those treasures. I would not recommend someone buy this book, but if you can find it in the library, it is certainly worth flipping through it.
27 of 32 people found the following review helpful
Good, entertaining reading about finance issues in the 80's 28 Feb. 2002
By Dan E. Ross - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a collection of essays previously published in newspapers and magazines around the nation where some 10 years ago we could witness Lewis' early literary attempts. The book was consistently funny, insightful, and a good primer on several financial issues that dominated the 1980's. Most of these articles, for those interested in the authors' chronological history, came after he wrote his groundbreaking financial humor book entitled Liars Poker, which is regarded as a "must read" for anyone entering into the investment banking industry, particularly in bond trading where we he worked.
Mr. Lewis' writing style is great, which is why I read his book entitled Next, another good read if you are interested. Most of the topics in this book cover financial/business culture issues that date back during the late eighties, so there's also a bit of historical perspective to it.
The topics are a wide array and include stories about the domestic S&L scandal, some events that occurred in the French Bourse (their word for a stock market), the proliferation of the American Express Card during the 1980s, some offshore banking insights, Louis Rukeyser, Donald Trump, LBO stories and some comments on the Japanese capitalists. Like I said, he talks about a wide array of topics but remember that the book is a compilation of many articles.
I give it a 4 star rating. It was highly entertaining but nothing that caused my life to change or caused me to have a "light bulb" go off in my head.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Not Lewis's Best Work 4 Feb. 2008
By S. T. Sullivan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Michael Lewis wrote one of the great popular books about Wall Street, Liar's Poker: Rising Through the Wreckage on Wall Street. It is a classic of what life was like on Wall Street during the time when mortgage backed securities, something we're hearing a lot about currently, was just getting off the ground. He also wrote the bestseller Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, which is a great baseball book. This collection of pieces written right before and after Liar's Poker is all right, but it is not his best work.

I have a high tolerance for bad writing if I am interested in the subject manner, but even I had trouble getting through some of the early pieces in here. Perhaps Lewis had to get all this poor sophomoric writing out of his system before he could write decent books. If the pieces collected in Money Culture are what it takes to get to Moneyball, then so be it.

Still, from a reader's standpoint, don't bother with this one, read Liar's Poker and Moneyball instead.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
The Money Culture is US? 9 Jun. 2001
By Walter Nicolau - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a collection of essays previously published in newspapers and magazines around the nation where some 10 years ago we could witness Lewis' early literary attempts. Although Lewis is a witty, scrutinizing, insightful, and overall entertaining writer, I think this book is highly overpriced. Most of the topics in this book cover financial/business culture issues that date back during the late eighties, so there's also a bit of historical perspective to it, when LBOs were a la mode, Donald Trump was making headlines, and Japan was considered a threat to the US economy and welfare...crazy thought. Go for Liar's Poker if you want to read Michael Lewis, that script is a jewel.
20 of 26 people found the following review helpful
don't let liar's poker fool you 24 Jun. 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I thoroughly enjoyed Liar's Poker. Having finished that, I picked up The Money Culture since I thought Michael Lewis did such a wonderful job with the previous book. Was I ever wrong. Buried deep within the holier-than-thou attitude was that slight trace of sarcasm that made Liar's Poker so great. Why did I ever pay for a collection of pure random thoughts? For a no-holds-barred look at the world of finance, I recommend Money Business and F.I.A.S.C.O.
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