Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

The Miniaturist: A Novel Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 2,482 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"

Length: 419 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of £2.99 after you buy the Kindle book.
Audible Narration: Ready

Get a Free Kindle Book
Between now and 26 February 2016 you can earn a free Kindle Book by simply downloading and registering the free Kindle reading app, buying a Kindle Book, or buying a book. Learn more
Get a £1 credit for movies or TV
Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle ebook from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle ebooks) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at on Friday, 26 February, 2016. Terms and conditions apply

Product Description

Review

The kind of book that reminds you why you fell in love with reading A fabulously gripping read that will appeal to fans of Girl With a Pearl Earring and The Goldfinch, but Burton is a genuinely new voice with her visceral take on sex, race and class ... Burton writes great complex female characters Observer A terrific novel: compelling cast, gripping plot, writing to savour A remarkable debut - complex, involving and deeply atmospheric The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton is set in 17th century Amsterdam where a trader presents his new wife Nella with a miniature replica of their home. Its tiny occupants mirror their real-life counterparts and show Nella what grave dangers lie in wait. Daily Express A delight on every page, The Miniaturist completely immerses the reader in sumptuous but strict seventeenth-century Amsterdam. Like the intricately crafted doll's house at the centre of the novel, there is a surprise behind each closed door and curtain - hidden worlds of deceit and seduction, guilds and guilders, candied walnuts and sugar loaves. Burton's novel is lovingly done, and exquisite to read Utterly beguiling and impeccably written. I am missing the characters already Utterly transporting, The Miniaturist is one of those rare debut novels that excels in every regard. The past is brought to life in potent, sensory detail: one feels steeped in it. Burton's prose beguiles the reader, while a riptide of a plot takes hold with an unrelenting grip of suspense. My first instinct on finishing this book was to immediately read it again

Review

'The Miniaturist is that rarest of things – beautifully written, yet also a compelling page-turner. It's haunting, magical, and full of surprises, the kind of book that reminds you why you fell in love with reading.' (S J Watson)

'A remarkable debut – complex, involving and deeply atmospheric.' (Deborah Moggach)

'The next big thing ... Incredibly well-written, beautifully plotted ... If you tore through Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch, you'll love it.' (Evening Standard)

'A fabulously gripping read that will appeal to fans of Girl With a Pearl Earring and The Goldfinch, but Burton is a genuinely new voice with her visceral take on sex, race and class ... Burton writes great complex female characters.' (The Observer)

'Utterly transporting, The Miniaturist is one of those rare debut novels that excels in every regard. The past is brought to life in potent, sensory detail: one feels steeped in it. Burton's prose beguiles the reader, while a riptide of a plot takes hold with an unrelenting grip of suspense. My first instinct on finishing this book was to immediately read it again.' (Hannah Kent)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1106 KB
  • Print Length: 419 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0062306847
  • Publisher: Ecco; Reprint edition (26 Aug. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00H1UK3UO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 2,482 customer reviews
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
I put off reading The Miniaturist because it was so wildly successful upon its release and I hate going into a book on a wave of hype - I am so often then underwhelmed! Set in 1680s Amsterdam, the novel explores the hidden secrets of a wealthy merchant family as they are uncovered through a series of unexpected parcels.

For me, The Miniaturist read as two parallel books which never quite came satisfactorily together. On one hand, the historical novel of the Brandt family is wonderfully researched and portrayed and I loved picturing the vibrant trading city. We have visited Amsterdam ourselves, in midwinter, so I could remember the pretty canals and the bitter, damp cold! Burton does a great job of describing the people, their clothing and food. Especially the food! I was reminded of my hunger while reading Julie Lawford's Singled Out and The Temporary Bride by Jennifer Klinec. The Brandt household's diverse characters sit well together although events do get rather over-melodramatic at the painting-ripping point.

The alternate storyline is that of the eponymous Miniaturist, a model maker employed by new Brandt wife Nella to furnish the lavish doll's house that was her wedding gift. As well as the ordered items, Nella receives others that confuse her. However, as she begins to understand what is really going on in her husband's house, the extra items become scarily prophetic. I liked the idea of the doll's house and the descriptions of its tiny rooms and furnishings. The possibly magical element didn't really fit for me though and I think the novel could have been just as intriguing without this plot device.

The repressive religious beliefs of 17th century Amsterdam compete with its inhabitants' greed for guilders showing everyone to be a hypocrite to some degree.
Read more ›
Comment 9 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This was a much hyped book. In my temporary Christmas job at Waterstone's I was told to push it at every customer who came to the till. Is it worthy of such hype? Not exactly. It is a beautifully presented hardback; the ideal Christmas gift.

The novel is a sweet and light confection like the delights one finds in the bakers of Amsterdam. The story is set in the seventeenth century. Nella, just eighteen, arrives from the country to marry a rich Amsterdam merchant, Johaness, who ignores her completely. The household consists of Johaness' bitter and cold sister, Marin, a female servant and a black manservant, Otto, from the tropics. Nella is given a dollhouse to amuse herself. The mysterious miniaturist sends pieces to fill the dollhouse whose fashioning suggests a rather too intimate knowledge with the goings on of the house. Nella becomes intrigued and endeavours to find out the identity of the miniaturist. Johanness' dark secret is revealed to all and tragedy befalls the household.

The book is delicately written, Nella is a likeable and relatable heroine and the characters are well drawn, However, I couldn't help feeling that something was missing. The historical details of seventeenth century Amsterdam were fascinating and this was the main interest of the book to me. More could have been made of this. The story had the feel of a Victorian melodrama and was perhaps too flimsy a tale for the hype the book received. I yearned for more depth. The novel felt slow to start but did involve me in the maelstrom from the middle onwards.

Worth reading but I am puzzled by the five star reviews and glowing publicity.
Comment 5 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I was really looking forward to this book, I am not sure what I was expecting but it certainly wasn't this. The writing is long and tedious, the locations limited and she seems to describe a single location multiple times and yet other instances when a description of the setting would be useful, just skims over it. Many things seem to happen with little or no follow through or reasoning and I found myself struggling to believe many aspects.
Character development seemed to flick backwards and forwards as if the author couldn't quite decide how the characters should behave and reactions I would have expected from the character didn't happen making me question their behaviour previously.

I am not sure why this book is called the Miniaturist because you could have quite easily removed the entire dolls house without changing the story. I feel very let down that this plot line wasn't followed through and just seems to have been abandoned when the author got bored with it.

I struggled through the book and only felt it actually got going in the last couple of chapters, meaning I was left feeling cheated that the book finished when I was finally interested. It seemed to end as soon as there were some actually difficulties for the characters to face.

I hadn't realised that Patronella Brandt was the real life doll house owner until after I read the book. I feel quite insulted on her behalf. The story in the book would have been tremendously salacious at the time and I can't imagine this woman would have approved at her name being tarnished in this way. I agree with a previous reviewer that another name should have been imagined for this character. It seems very disrespectful.
4 Comments 71 of 76 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Customer Discussions