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The Midnight Sun (The Twilight Zone) Paperback – 1 Jun 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 72 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (1 Jun 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 074758785X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0747587859
  • Product Dimensions: 18.6 x 0.7 x 25.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 717,833 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

`Serling's imagination opens doors to "a wondrous land" '
-- SFX magazine, March 2009

About the Author

Rod Serling worked as a writer and producer in television, and won the most Emmy awards for dramatic writing in the history of television. He wrote over seventy-five episodes of The Twilight Zone series, for which he won two of his Emmys. Rod was also the show's creator, host and narrator. Mark Kneece has written stories for Hellraiser (Marvel / Epic), Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight (DC Comics), The Spirit: New Adventures and Tarzan. Anthony Spay is currently a staff illustrator for Blitz magazine. He lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER on 6 Oct 2010
Format: Paperback
"The Midnight Sun" is a comic book adaptation of the Twilight Zone episode of the same name. In this alternate universe the sun shines continuously and the heat is rising with each passing day. As a result, water is scarce and civilization comes apart as people lose their minds, deprived of sleep and hydration. The story is told with a painter as the main character who observes the destruction from her apartment trying to survive but ready to face the inevitable.

It's a sharply realised story with a real sense of horror portrayed throughout. The artwork, while not fantastic, is enough for this story and the writing keeps you reading until the twisted ending. An enjoyable comic book for those looking to pass the time and who have a fond memory of that iconic TV show, "The Twilight Zone". A good read.
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Format: Hardcover
This is a throw-away comic blown up to look like a book - but a comic based on a TV script? It's as bad as you might imagine - and without the nostalgic aura of the original
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Tyler on 6 May 2011
Format: Paperback
Calling an extended comic book a graphic novel always seemed a little arrogant to me. Most graphic novels contain more pictures than words and could be at best described as graphic novellas. This series of comic based reimaginings of classic Twilight Zone episodes, originally written by Rod Serling, tries its best to disprove me. This is one wordy graphic novel and the pace of the story suffers for it.

Set in New York, `The Midnight Sun' is all about the world heating up and how society copes with the impending end. As in most cases the book has a `Twilight Zone' set of twists, but for the most part it centres around two women who are the last people to remain in their apartment block. The dialogue between the two does go on and highlights the flaw of adapting old TV shows into comic form. `The Twilight Zone' contained big ideas, but small budgets; therefore Serling was forced to write situations that the studio could afford. Comics can have big ideas and go anywhere - ink is the same price for a space epic as it is for a kitchen sink drama. However, `Midnight Sun' is constrained by the limitations of the script.

There are panels that hint of a more epic world crisis, but too often you are stuck indoors with pages of dialogue. The artist is also not the most inspirational as the illustrations looked almost too realistic for my tastes. `Midnight Sun' suggests that the original `Twilight Zone' should be left well alone in an era were small scale was expected and accepted. This graphic novel does nothing but undermine some of Serling's great work.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Captain EO on 21 Jun 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"The Midnight Sun" is one of a number in a set of graphic novels featuring updated re-tellings of classic Twilight Zone episodes. It's a great idea & the books themselves are beautifully presented with introductions linking the ground-breaking tv series to today's audience.

It's great to see Rod Serling appear in comic-book form to both introduce & conclude the story & as a reader I genuinely felt the atmosphere of the classic tv series as I turned the pages, no easy-feat !!!

The story of "The Midnight Sun" was dark & moody, far from the more light-hearted episodes of the Twilight Zone & includes a typical twist to leave you almost hearing the familiar theme-tune as you close the final page. As far as I'm concerned that means the book did it's job so I'm off order another book soon.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The burning hour 6 Oct 2010
By Sam Quixote - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
"The Midnight Sun" is a comic book adaptation of the Twilight Zone episode of the same name. In this alternate universe the sun shines continuously and the heat is rising with each passing day. As a result, water is scarce and civilization comes apart as people lose their minds, deprived of sleep and hydration. The story is told with a painter as the main character who observes the destruction from her apartment trying to survive but ready to face the inevitable.

It's a sharply realised story with a real sense of horror portrayed throughout. The artwork, while not fantastic, is enough for this story and the writing keeps you reading until the twisted ending. An enjoyable comic book for those looking to pass the time and who have a fond memory of that iconic TV show, "The Twilight Zone". A good read.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Well Adapted Episode of the TV Show 24 Jan 2013
By Joseph M. Reninger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The Twilight Zone is a classic science fiction television series from the 1960s. It was produced and hosted by Rod Serling who wrote more than half of the 156 episodes. The stories are so well told that the show is still repeated and readily available today. It was also a training ground for many actors and directors, including Robert Redford, Charles Bronson, Ron Howard, and William Shatner. A series of graphic novels were developed based on script episodes. This particular book comes from the tenth episode of the third season, also called "The Midnight Sun."

The story follows a young female artist, Norma, who lives in New York City. For the past several months, the weather has gotten hotter and hotter, driving citizens from the city. Those who have remained behind are slowly going crazy. She lives in a walk-up apartment. Her building is down to two residents--her and her neighbor Mrs. Bronson. They try to keep each others spirits up, even though there's no good news from the TV or from the passersby in the street. Norma paints sweltering landscapes that mirror the bleak heat outside the building. As with many Twilight Zone stories, the ending has a nice twist that I didn't see coming the first time I saw the episode on TV.

This adaptation stays very close to the script, even including scenes from the script that weren't filmed for budgetary and time constraints. It does a great job at capturing the oppressive heat and despair in the story as well as Norma's efforts to survive her various run-ins with desperate people. The visuals open up the story. It has the more epic feel that Serling could not capture on a television budget, depicting things like Liberty Island as a dried out hill next to Manhattan.

It's nice to visit stories from old favorites and the graphic novel format suits The Twilight Zone quite well.

Great quote from the introduction by Anna Marlis Burgard:

While he had his run-ins with censorship, Serling's clever use of other worlds and veiled scenarios generally protected him. As he explained, what he couldn't have a Republican or a Democrat espouse on the show, he could have an alien profess without offending the sponsors. This approach also allowed viewers to take away whatever message best suited them; the more reflective could consider the psychological and political implications, while others might be satisfied with simply enjoying the thrill of the surface story. So much more than mere science fiction or fantasy, Serling's scripts are parables that explore the multifaceted natures of hope, fear, humanity, loneliness, and self-delusion.
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