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The Martian Hardcover – 13 Feb 2014

2,340 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey (13 Feb. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091956137
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091956134
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 3.4 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2,340 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 159,051 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

ANDY WEIR was first hired as a programmer for a national laboratory at age fifteen and has been working as a software engineer ever since. He is also a lifelong space nerd and a devoted hobbyist of subjects like relativistic physics, orbital mechanics, and the history of manned spaceflight.

Product Description

Review

"Watney's gallows humour and his brushes with death as he uses every ounce of his intelligence and astronaut's training to claw his way out of the pit will have you laughing and gasping by turns. I read this book in a weekend. I didn't think I'd have the time to - but Andy Weir's edge-of-the-seat storytelling didn't leave me any choice." (Richard Madeley, Richard and Judy Book Club)

"Andy Weir's terrific 'lost in space' novel is an absolute page turner from first to last ... Tautly-written, full of extraordinary and fascinating detail about life in a frozen red desert so far from home, The Martian is one of the best thrillers either of us has read in years. Highly recommended." (Judy Finnigan, Richard and Judy Book Club)

"The best book I've read in ages. Clear your schedule before you crack the seal. This story will take your breath away faster than a hull breech. Smart, funny, and white-knuckle intense, The Martian is everything you want from a novel." (Hugh Howey New York Times bestselling author of Wool)

"The amount of research here is astounding. We’re suckers for well-grounded fiction, and on the technical side, The Martian is exemplary ... witty ... funny" (SFX)

"A book I just couldn’t put down! It has the very rare combination of a good, original story, interestingly real characters and fascinating technical accuracy…reads like MacGyver meets Mysterious Island." (Astronaut Chris Hadfield Commander of the International Space Station and author of An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth)

Book Description

The Sunday Times bestseller: Robinson Crusoe on Mars - a survival story for the 21st Century

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 13 April 2015
Format: Paperback
Mark Watney is one of the astronauts on the Ares 3 mission to Mars. Unfortunately, when the Ares 3 mission leaves, Mark is left behind, presumed dead. The fact that he isn’t dead comes as a bit of shock to him at first, and then he is left pondering how, or even whether, he can survive. He knows there is another mission planned but calculating his food supplies and other equipment he doesn’t believe he can survive until the Ares 4 mission lands, and even if he does the scheduled landing site is far away; how could he even get there if he is still alive? Keeping a detailed log of his days on Mars he struggles to set up some way firstly to keep himself alive, and only then does he consider communications. Can he contact anyone? What can they do to help him, even if he gets through?

In between, Mark attempts to keep his spirits up; each of the astronauts had personal music, movies, tv series on entertainment systems, so Mark can keep himself entertained wondering why Sherrif Rosco doesn’t just go to the Duke farm and arrest the boys when they’re not in the General Lee. It’s not until we’re about 50 pages into the book that we leave Mark’s log entries temporarily, to go to Earth, where at Mission Control they are commemorating his death. From there, the book alternates between both locations.

I really liked Mark as a character; he’s clearly intelligent; a botanist and an astronaut, he has the know-how and is enough of a geek to give things a go; after all, he has nothing to lose and everything to gain if he can find ways to survive. He has an irreverent sense of humour and this comes across in his log entries.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By ElaineG TOP 100 REVIEWER on 1 July 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Now The Martian is a read that everyone on Goodreads seems to be talking about and seems almost universally loved, so I had a bit of a shock three or four chapters when I found I wasn’t really liking it that much. The reason – the science - there is a lot of physics in this read and at first it seemed to go way over my head. But, I persevered and I am so glad I did, because pretty soon I was hooked and I ended up loving this read. It is a story of human endeavour against the odds, about never giving up even when the odds are totally stacked against you. I think though that the real reason I ended up loving this book was the main character, Mark Watney. What can I say about him? Well, he is funny, cheeky, irreverent, positive thinking, a doer. He is courageous and resourceful and it is his constant problem solving that really made me warm to him. Before I knew it I was rooting for him and desperately wanting him to survive. He is stuck in probably the harshest environment not yet known to man, where the slightest little accident could kill him, yet time and time again he puts his “problem solving” cap on and works out a solution. He is a very real character, one that I totally fell for and in the end it almost felt as if I was reading about a real person. Similarly, the physics, despite being way over my head at times, felt real and feasible.

It is a cracking read and now I cannot wait to see the film and from what I have seen of it from the trailer there are a few subtle differences so it should be well worth seeing.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 13 April 2015
Format: Hardcover
Mark Watney is one of the astronauts on the Ares 3 mission to Mars. Unfortunately, when the Ares 3 mission leaves, Mark is left behind, presumed dead. The fact that he isn’t dead comes as a bit of shock to him at first, and then he is left pondering how, or even whether, he can survive. He knows there is another mission planned but calculating his food supplies and other equipment he doesn’t believe he can survive until the Ares 4 mission lands, and even if he does the scheduled landing site is far away; how could he even get there if he is still alive? Keeping a detailed log of his days on Mars he struggles to set up some way firstly to keep himself alive, and only then does he consider communications. Can he contact anyone? What can they do to help him, even if he gets through?

In between, Mark attempts to keep his spirits up; each of the astronauts had personal music, movies, tv series on entertainment systems, so Mark can keep himself entertained wondering why Sherrif Rosco doesn’t just go to the Duke farm and arrest the boys when they’re not in the General Lee. It’s not until we’re about 50 pages into the book that we leave Mark’s log entries temporarily, to go to Earth, where at Mission Control they are commemorating his death. From there, the book alternates between both locations.

I really liked Mark as a character; he’s clearly intelligent; a botanist and an astronaut, he has the know-how and is enough of a geek to give things a go; after all, he has nothing to lose and everything to gain if he can find ways to survive. He has an irreverent sense of humour and this comes across in his log entries.
Read more ›
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