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The Marriage of Jesus: The Lost Wife of the Hidden Years Paperback – 28 Sep 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 190 pages
  • Publisher: O Books (28 Sep 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846940087
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846940088
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.4 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,558,435 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Maggy Whitehouse is a minister in an independent sacramental church and a stand-up comedian as well as a prolific author on Bible women and history, metaphysics and Judaic mysticism.

Her books include 'A Woman's Worth--The Divine Feminine in the Hebrew Bible,' 'Prosperity Teachings of the Bible Made Easy' and the fictional 'Miracle Man' (O-Books), a novel about a modern-day messiah who is a judge on the US X Factor. Imagine a Simon Cowell figure as Christ.

Her other fiction books include 'The Chronicles of Deborah,' a series about a female cousin of Jesus of Nazareth who is raised as his sister.

Maggy trained as a journalist and has worked in print media, radio and television including the BBC World Service. She was the UK's second female breakfast DJ on local radio and an assistant producer on the fabled Pebble Mill at One.

She wrote her first book, China By Rail, in 1987 after spending six summers travelling around China - and met her first husband while filming two ITV documentaries in China a year later. Henry Barley died a year after their wedding in 1990 and it was the hospital chaplain who told Maggy that, as an atheist, Henry could not go to heaven, who inspired her to start investigating alternatives to her previous 'armchair Christianity.'

This search was intensified after she came out the winner in a brief encounter with an eight-foot barracuda off the Barrier Reef in Australia...

Maggy is co-founder of the Midlands holistic magazine, The Tree of Life and was the founder-producer of the BBC's now-defunct spirituality website, which was morphed into the corporation's Religion & Ethics site.

In 2012 she began a new venture as a stand-up comedian and is now gigging in London and the South West as well as appearing at the 2014 Edinburgh Fringe.

Maggy lives in Devon, England, with her husband, Peter Dickinson.

Product Description

Review

"The Marriage of Jesus" is enjoyable, thought-provoking and fascinating. Author Maggy Whitehouse seamlessly blends an impressive mix of scholarship, practicality and mysticism. She demonstrates a deep knowledge of the lives of people in Biblical times in presenting this powerful and plausible theory. This book should be read by everyone involved in contemporary religious study. Dr David Goddard, author of Sacred Marriage of the Angels and other titles.

About the Author

Maggy Whitehouse is the author of Living Kabbalah and The Book of Deborah. She founded and produced BBCi's holistic health and spirituality website 360, edits The Tree of Life magazine and is an accomplished speaker and workshop leader in all matters of interfaith. She is an ordained minister in the Apostolic Church of the Risen Christ.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. Jackson on 1 Jun 2011
Format: Paperback
Whitehouse's argument that Jesus was probably married is presented in a thoughtful and thought-provoking style, generously acknowledging that there is little evidence either way. However, she constructs a well reasoned argument, and discusses other issues relating to the more social side of life in the time of Jesus. I highly recommend this book to any students of the era and of Christianity, to encourage you to think outside the box.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Adamos on 7 April 2013
Format: Paperback
This is an extraordinary book that challenges conventional perceptions of the figure of Jesus and the concept of Christhood in a way that is both intellectually penetrating and spiritually uplifting.

Whitehouse presents strong arguments for why Jesus would have been married, a radical view of both Mary Magdalene and Mary, mother of Jesus, but never once claims to offer THE Truth. Instead, Whitehouse makes clear that this is her view and she offers evidence in a rational and coherent way. Her fictionalised account of what Jesus's wife and family may have been like offers an intriguing and tantalising view of Jesus's world and, while purely speculative (and claiming to be nothing more than speculation,) it nonetheless contributes significantly to the reader's understanding of the subject. Whitehouse is also a talented author of fiction and it is to be hoped she one day turns the fictional sections of this book into a full length novel.

It is regrettable that there is no bibliography, but various acknowledgments to the work of other writers demonstrates that the ideas contained in the book are based on genuine research. Indeed the author's breadth of learning and understanding are breathtaking and, whether you agree with her conclusions or not, there can be no questioning the quality of her scholarship.

Whitehouse's aim is clearly not to debunk Christianity or those who hold a Christian (or Jewish) faith, but she successfully contributes to an important debate that reclaims the role of the feminine, the status of women in spiritual work and the very essence of what it means to be a spiritual person, male or female, in a world too often ruled by dogma and bigotry.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Martin J. Manifold on 25 Aug 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
i enjoyed the book....especially the bit about lillith and eve being adams second wife ....my only downer on this book is the author disses the da vinci code by dan brown too much.....which is on one my favourite films .....but on the whole .......a good book which many a blinkerd christian may dislike . if you are up on ancient jewish custom ......jesus being married would've been the norm .......plenty to think about
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
Reassessing Christ.... 8 April 2013
By Adamos - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is an extraordinary book that challenges conventional perceptions of the figure of Jesus and the concept of Christhood in a way that is both intellectually penetrating and spiritually uplifting.

Maggy Whitehouse presents strong arguments for why Jesus would have been married, a radical view of both Mary Magdalene and Mary, mother of Jesus, but never once claims to offer THE Truth. Instead, she makes clear that this is her view and she offers evidence in a rational and coherent way. Her fictionalised account of what Jesus's wife and family may have been like offers an intriguing and tantalising view of Jesus's world and, while purely speculative (and claiming to be nothing more than speculation,) it nonetheless contributes significantly to the reader's understanding of the subject. Maggy Whitehouse is also a talented author of fiction and it is to be hoped she one day turns the fictional sections of this book into a full length novel.

It is regrettable that there is no bibliography, but various acknowledgments to the work of other writers demonstrates that the ideas contained in the book are based on genuine research. Indeed the author's breadth of learning and understanding are breathtaking and, whether you agree with her conclusions or not, there can be no questioning the quality of her scholarship.

Maggy Whitehouse's aim is clearly not to debunk Christianity or those who hold a Christian (or Jewish) faith, but she successfully contributes to an important debate that reclaims the role of the feminine, the status of women in spiritual work and the very essence of what it means to be a spiritual person, male or female, in a world too often ruled by dogma and bigotry.

Those who hold a strictly Christian or Jewish faith will find this an uncomfortable book to read, as it clearly has the amazon.com reviewer, but, for those willing to approach the book with an open mind, it offers a rich and stimulating reassessment of Jesus for the twenty first century and a valuable, unsensationalised contribution to contemporary debate about the relevance of the teachings of Jesus for the modern world.
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Uncomfortable reading 20 Feb 2009
By snow violet - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have long been intrigued by the notion that Jesus may have been married; so I looked forward to reading this book. They say, "You cant tell a book by its cover", but this one you can. The fact that they chose to depict Jesus' possible wife in an actual photo, made me very uncomfortable. We dont even know for certain if He had a wife, and here this books puts forth an actual stock photograph of a woman instead of an illustration or even a silhouette that leaves the mind open to wonder about the possibilities of the unknown and unconfirmed woman. Its almost sacrilege. The content of the book is unfortunately much the same. The author even assigns a fictional name to His wife and tells fictional stories of this girl's daily life. I did not intend to purchase a work of fiction; I wanted historical information on the debate surrounding the possible existence of this woman. I skipped over the fictional accounts since they made me so uncomfortable. I do, however, confess that much of the research in the other parts was very interesting and well researched. Its too bad that the fictionalization and familiarity with Jesus' possible wife will obscure the interesting historical facts and insights into the social norms of the day contained within the pages.
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