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The Man With The Horn
 
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The Man With The Horn

23 May 1988 | Format: MP3

£5.69 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £9.33 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
9:52
30
2
11:14
30
3
5:48
30
4
8:08
30
5
6:31
30
6
10:43
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 23 May 1988
  • Release Date: 23 May 1988
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 52:16
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001GUDYTC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 77,295 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jan De Meyer on 11 Dec. 2009
Format: Audio CD
I started to discover the music of Miles Davis during his years of retirement in the late seventies. "The Man With The Horn" was among the first recordings of Miles I bought. I immediately loved it and still do. Most of the songs are propelled by the forceful drumming of Al Foster and Marcus Miller's great bass. Guitarists Barry Finnerty and Mike Stern as well as saxman Bill Evans are in great shape too. Two songs ("Shout" and the title tune) are more mellow or pop-like, though they fortunately avoid the cheapness (sorry) of later covers like Cindy Lauper's "Time after time".

Miles himself is in great shape too. Forget what the critics say about him trying to regain his former chops. The music on "The Man With The Horn" is bold and energetic, it's groovy and funky, it's jazz that rocks. I've listened to the record and the cd many hundreds of times and I'm sure I'll never be bored even for a second.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Frank Burling on 25 Nov. 2009
Format: Audio CD
If you like jazz, funk and rock rolled into one, then this is the album for you. More rocky than most Miles albums with great guitar solos and driving funk basslines.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. David A. Norris on 2 Jun. 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I had to buy this disc as somehow I appear to have lost the original. I was having a Miles evening and went to play it and could not find it anywhere, and it is actually of a standard that if you like Miles you should have it. It is not out of the top drawer but it is far from being lightweight. There is enough here in terms of composition and the quality of playing to justify this as being part of any decent Miles collection, so not just for completists, but not an essential for a more casual listener
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Johnny L on 6 Oct. 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I first heard this through a friend who had the album in 1982.
I'd vaguely heard of Miles Davis, knew that he was something big in jazz in the 50's and 60's. I was told he'd been off the scene for a while; been ill apparently. But why was Marcus Miller on this album?, I mused; after all, wasn't Miles Davis just some bebop head? To protestations proclaiming otherwise, I was expecting something out of the 1950's.
How wrong I was.
The infectious rhythm of 'Fat Time', courtesy of Marcus and Al Foster; the way it builds step by funky step, with Miles injecting his unique trumpet sounds along the way had me hooked by the first few bars. Bill Evans, then Mike Stern, both unknown (to me, anyway), lay down some HEAVY solos that just go on and on in a pure rock sound (had Miles gone for a coffee, I wondered). I liked it. What's next?
Then 'Back Seat Betty' opens with a growling guitar scream, Barry Finnerty using feedback like you never heard on a jazz cut. Once again the rhythm section drives the track along; it cruises with sly intent, rather than drives confidently down the road. Miles puts down a vibe. Then the guitar scream begins the next part, with Miles and Bill matching the anger in solos that never seem indulgent. By now I was entranced.
'Shout' always makes me think that's how Herb Alpert would sound if he'd lived in a project. But after the near 12 minutes of 'Betty', it's a welcome relief, really.
'Aida' follows; it grinds along with venom, as though bebop met 4/4 rock and kicked its ass by adapting all its moves.
The next track 'The Man With The Horn' sits VERY uneasily amongst all of this mayhem. That's the best I can say. Was it perhaps meant to be a hit single?
'Ursula' is what I'd been expecting all along.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. AOKI on 10 May 2009
Format: Audio CD
At that time rock music has come to the front and "Jazz music has been dying",Miles Davis said in his autobiography. Miles Davis has thought that he have to keep jazz music arrive so he was playing with Harbie Hancock,Ron Carter,Tonny Williams and Wayne Shorter. And thier jazz music were getting faster and faster just like the rain was gettig hard and hard. Yes! Miles had a something jazz music in view.As it were evolution,changing of jazz music and he was waiting for something next. At same years Bob Dylan shifted from acoustic guitar to electric guitar and he was singing "Like A Rolling Stone" at the top of his voice with suffering the storm of blaming. And Miles said "Free jazz music became powerful by white people's adulation." Miles Davis was seeking the way of jazz ,it is not free style but new style keeping tradition of jazz music to draw and charme young people. Existance of post contemporary jazz and leading the jazz music, these were his destiny and mission ,I think so.
At last it had come! Miles Davis found the way with Hancock,Shorter,Chick Corea,Keith,Zawinul,Weather Report... it was the way that jazz music fused into rock music. I think that the soul of jazz is peculiar rythm all black music has, weakness and strength of sound ,unique musical scale and improvisation. The new style of jazz music Miles Davis created was keeping tradition of jazz and fusing jazz into rock music by his own way.It has drawed the heart of young people and chermed again. After that I think that he left the destiny of jazz to something coming next after he has been keeping on playing and has not tired of creating not t improvisation of new style jazz. And the end of traveling of playing exciting and experimental improvisation,Miles has gone that he could not play trampet.
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