The Man Who Rained and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Man Who Rained has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Get this book fast, expedited shipping available. We guarantee the following - No missing or damaged pages, no creases or tears, no underlining or highlighting of text, and no writing in the margins. Very little wear and tear.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Man Who Rained Hardcover – 1 Jan 2012


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£14.99
£6.50 £0.01
Audio CD
"Please retry"
£17.35
£14.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Man Who Rained + The Earth Hums in B Flat
Price For Both: £22.50

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books (1 Jan. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857890328
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857890320
  • Product Dimensions: 21.1 x 14.5 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 557,864 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

The most compelling thing about this book... is not the mere plot but Shaw's striking facility with the language... this is such an imaginative novel, written with such attention to words, and such a sense of wonder, that those who savour such skills will find themselves thoroughly transported. --Observer

The Man Who Rained is delicately crafted... Its story haunting and thoroughly, charmingly different --Sunday Times --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Ali Shaw grew up in Dorset and graduated from Lancaster University with a degree in English Literature. He has since worked as a bookseller and at Oxford's Bodleian Library. His first novel, The Girl with Glass Feet, was a huge commercial and critical success, won the Desmond Elliot Prize and was shortlisted for the Costa First Book Award. He is currently at work on his third novel.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Blodeuedd on 24 Jan. 2012
Format: Hardcover
I read this first book, The Girl with glass feet and was smitten. He made me believe it all could be real. That in some parts of the world there was still magic that was not truly magic, it was just life. It's not like paranormal books where you just read it but do not believe. Here, here it is different. Perhaps men can rain, and perhaps rain can come to life.

His prose is lyrical and it sucks you in, it holds on to you and it also made me feel scared. This is a town filled with superstitious people who kill that of rain and thunder. While on the mountain there lives a strange man called Finn, who is our man who rained. I feared for him.

The story is about Elsa who comes to Thundertown to start a new life. She is nice and curious and meets Finn. Who is mysterious and sweet. He shows her a world that seems to exist only in these mountains. It's a book filled with magical realism and feelings of longing, love but also hate of the unknown. And here it truly shows. That which you do not know you fear and think is dangerous. Only some give it a chance and find that we are all alike in the end.

The book is great, the writing, the story, the people in it and the world he creates. It's a place were sunbeams come to life.

Conclusion:
It's a book I recommend because it is so real and still so magical. I can't wait for his next book and see what he comes up with then. It was simply enchanting, heartbreaking and lovely.

Cover:
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Louise Buxton on 14 Feb. 2012
Format: Hardcover
If you have read The Girl with Glass Feet this is in a similar vein, so if you enjoyed the first you will probably like this. This time he is playing with the idea of personification of the weather. I enjoyed reading it, but I did feel it was a little like watching a film or tv show in the sense of having stock characters - the town bully and his sidekick, the old helpful saintly nun, the man with a cross to bear x3 (Daniel, Kenneth and Finn), the girl from the broken home and so on.
The other surprising thing to me about Ali Shaw having got round to reading his potted bio, is that he is from England ( and a man - when I read his first book I assumed Ali was a woman). His writing in both books seemed to me to have an American feel.
Elsa is a slightly unsatisfactory heroine and probably his least sympathetic character other than Sidney Moses and Abe Cosser. I found Daniel to be the most interesting in the end, probably very clever of Ali to get me to that from D's initial unfavourable appearance.
The descriptive writing is strong and the sense of place with the mountains brooding over the town is well expressed. I wouldn't want to go there though!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By B. Robinson on 13 Jan. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
When I saw that this book was released on New Year's Day I had to treat myself. I bought and really enjoyed Ali Shaw's debut novel The Girl with Glass Feet and was hoping that this one would not disappoint. I'm glad to say in my opinion that it didn't disappoint at all.

Ali Shaw has a distinctive style of writing that draws you into the story. He has the ability to write fairy tales for Adults, that are full of magic and are a joy to read. At the heart of this book is a story about relationships and maybe a touch of romance.

Elsa has always had a keen interest in the weather from an early age. It's all down to her father's interest in storms and this is his downfall in the end. It's following her father's death that Elsa re-evaluates her own relationship and her life in New York. Elsa is drawn to Thunderstown which she'd seen some years ago from a plane window. All is not as it seems in Thunderstown and the reader is soon caught up in the happenings and how day to day life differs from the 'norm'. As we are introduced to some of the inhabitants we realise that like in all good fairy tales, we have some goodies and some baddies to tell you more about these inhabitants would spoil the story as I'd prefer you all to draw your own conclusions as to which side everyone is on.

Elsa happens upon Finn Munro one day and soon realises that he is not quite what one usually expects in a man but it's her love of clouds and all things weather related that attracts her to him. This attraction doesn't please everyone and as things spiral out of control, events happen and nothing will be as it was before!

What happens and whether the story has a happy ending you'll have to read for yourself. If like me you enjoy modern well written magical fairy tales aimed at Adults then this book is for you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Annabel Gaskell VINE VOICE on 9 Feb. 2012
Format: Hardcover
When Ali Shaw's first magical novel, The Girl with Glass Feet was published in 2009, I was drawn to this adult fairy-tale like a Greek sailor to the sirens, nothing could have stopped me reading it. Luckily for me, it was good - very good. Without doubt, it was the best debut I read in 2009, and when Ali did a local event to me, he turned out to be one of the most fascinating authors I'd heard speak, I championed this book everywhere. This meant, for me though, that his second novel had an awful lot to live up to...

Elsa Beletti needs to escape - from the claustrophobia of her city life and her boyfriend. She grew up in the open spaces of Ohio, where her father was a fearless stormchaser; always happier outside, he was ultimately killed in a tornado.

"She'd seen it as a kid, when an afternoon storm had lifted the gutter of the ranch's barn, twirled it in the air like a baton, then flicked it at him. It broke his leg. Being holed up in the house while it healed made him catatonic. `I'm weather-powered, see,' he mumbled once, and it was the best way to describe him."

Elsa is drawn to a small settlement nestled amongst the mountains that she'd spied from an aeroplane window once. Thunderstown is isolated, it's a trek to get there, but she's not alone in having found this backwater which is surrounded by weather. The residents of the town are a real mixture - good and bad, traditional and modernising, jobsworth and helpful. Almost all of them however, are superstitious about the town's legendary Old Man Thunder - except Daniel Fossiter, the town's `culler' (whose job is to keep the local wild goat population in check), he has reason to think differently.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback