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The Man Who Hated Football Paperback – 29 Jul 2011

8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial (29 July 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007175558
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007175550
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,249,671 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

‘Buckley is a talented writer and storyteller. This is a smart, speedy and likeable debut.’ Observer

About the Author

Will Buckley is a sports journalist for the Guardian and the Observer.

Customer Reviews

2.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. Sellek on 19 Mar. 2006
Format: Paperback
Will Buckley writes well. His next book will be more of a challenge though, if he's moving outside the realm of sport. I hope he succeeds though because the general premise of this book, that football has become grotesque and stupid was very timely - and also very brave if you consider his occupation. As he alludes to at the back of the book its heavily influenced, and I mean very heavily influenced by Steve Tirsch's Karoo. Its doesn't get near the quality of that but it's still pretty good. Like Stirling, like Will Buckley the book isn't to be taken too seriously. (Although if your as self deprecating as will buckley then this isn't to be self deprecating at all-I'm of the school of thought that thinks that modesty is rapidly becoming the new bragging).
Loved the sly dig at Jimmy's sunday supplement, I cant help watching it now thinkng how terribly seriously the panelists take it. There's more laughs on question time! Will Buckley is also someone to aspire to for me, as someone who gave up on law to become a sports writer. It would be great if he could write a book about a legal version of a rebellious stirling who works for a law firm. The legal proffession, like football could do with a shot in the arm.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Smart Mart 13 on 9 Nov. 2010
Format: Paperback
According to the blurb on the back cover this book is "a comic novel" and as such I was expecting a laugh or two. However, after reading all 283 pages I am still waiting for my first laugh.
Ok, so it's not funny but it still might be a great work of literature. Sadly, no.
There are almost as many commas as there are words; most sentences peppered between them.
Or as the author would probably write...
There are almost, but not quite, as many commas, irritating for sure, as there are words with, surprisingly, most sentences, as this one, peppered, liberally, I might add with irritation, may I say very irritating, inclusions between them.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By G. L. Haggett VINE VOICE on 30 Nov. 2005
Format: Paperback
More than a little autobiographical, this entertaining take on the travails of a disillusioned 40-year-old father, husband and sportswriter is a biting satire on the preoccupations of modern life. It highlights the pretentiousness and emptiness of much of the modern sportswriting which has gained a bogus respectability since "Fever Pitch" and fillets the various characters to be found within that field. Highly recommended for those who enjoy the game but despair at how serious it seems to have become.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Chris M. on 27 May 2009
Format: Paperback
I'll be honest. TMWHF is one of the few novels I've ever read. I was drawn to it because (a) I don't care much for football and (b) I live close to where the central character lives i.e. the Norfolk/Suffolk borders. The book starts really well, with a comic portrayal of family life, but rapidly goes downhill from there. It's pretty obvious the whole thing is heavily autobiographical, and I felt absolutely no sympathy for Jimmy Stirling nor his loathsome work colleagues whose language is unnecessarily peppered with 'F' and 'C' words (strangely, lesser words such as 'bloody' are entirely absent). When will people realise that swearing is not automatically funny or clever (think opening sequence of 'Four Weddings')?

In one of the few other novels I've read, a clutch of the main characters all suffer a vaguely comical death at the end, and I really wished that Stirling and co would go the same way. Having skim-read some of the more dreary sections, I was glad to get to the end, and would not recommend this book to anyone except cheesed-off football writers.
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