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The Man of Gold Paperback – 21 Nov 1985


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Paperback, 21 Nov 1985
£27.08

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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Century; Paperback First Edition edition (21 Nov. 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0712610510
  • ISBN-13: 978-0712610513
  • Product Dimensions: 19.8 x 12.4 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,033,200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

A young scholar priest, simply, who is sent on a quest of enormous significance... extreme peril - check, love interest - check, alien races - check, complex political situation - check, high action - check, sheer stultifying beauty - check, humour - check, anything missing - nope. The perfect book if you love a story with real, tangible depth and flavour you can really savour... don't rush reading this, take your time.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

  • Flamesong

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. MacNeil on 17 Nov. 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Fantastically rich and complex, this book sucks you right in, slowly. Tiny details worm their way into your brain creating astonishing new insights with every chapter. M A R Barker is a master craftsman with language - never dry or boring, always precisely and beautifully evocative.

What's it about? A young scholar priest, simply, who is sent on a quest of enormous significance... extreme peril - check, love interest - check, alien races - check, complex political situation - check, high action - check, sheer stultifying beauty - check, humour - check, anything missing - nope. The perfect book if you love a story with real, tangible depth and flavour you can really savour... don't rush reading this, take your time.

If you want a romping, fluffy page-turner look elsewhere. And, please, PLEASE do NOT confuse this with the vastly inferior, pale imitation found in "Magician".
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Stunning 16 April 2000
By Jon Hancock - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The American edition of this book welcomes you with a gorgeous Michael Whelan cover, richly coloured and full of life. Only after reading more about the world of Tekumel do you notice that it gets every important detail wrong. Still, the text is the important thing and the text here shines from every page. Professor Barker is a better storyteller than you might expect from an academic and this tale of a young priest and the alien society he lives in is a grand tale. Because the world of Tekumel is so unfamiliar to western readers, having more in common with Aztec and Indian cultures, Professor Barker chose to make his hero something of an outsider too, in this case raised as a child by the insect-like Pe Choi. This certainly helps when it comes to explaining the intricacies of the world without sounding too much like, well, a professor. It is not a perfect novel, though, as for my taste there is rather a lot of unlikely coincidence and the plot rapidly escalates towards a James Bond "fate of the entire world" scenario, which seems unnecessary given the richness of material here. Bucking tradition, however, the sequel "Flamesong" is even better. Out of print for years now, "The Man of Gold" is so enjoyable despite its flaws that I tend to buy copies when I find them, to pass on to interested friends. A British edition also exists, with a bilious green cover, making this first novel easier to find than the sequel.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
A crime that this book is not widely recognized 11 Feb. 1999
By Aaron Brown - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When you see much of the other trash out there (on the best sellers list no less) you cease to wonder why baywatch has been on TV so long. This book (and its mate Flamesong) offer a world that is both complex and believable. I have found that most fans are people who roleplay in this world, but anyone will enjoy this book (as I have never even seen the game). I wish that these two books would enjoy success so Prof. Barker would put out more of these.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
The Most Detailed of Worlds 10 Feb. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
M.A.R. Barker has created one of the most detailed and intricate worlds in fiction. It is often compared to Tolkien's Middle Earth, but Tekumel is very, very different.
Barker's style and world generation is actually the equivalent of what is termed "hard science fiction", whereas Tolkien's is true fantasy, or more the model of style for what is termed "soft SF" or "science fantasy." Barker's stories are never "magical" in the sense of the fairy tale, which was the hallmark of Tolkien. They are dynamic, gritty, and overwhelming in their minute details. His entire world, in fact, is set in a far future and based on a science fiction universe of extremely advanced technologies wherein this one world (or perhaps all the universe) has undergone a horrendous trauma (be it war or cosmic cataclysm has yet to be explained, though promised for the new volumes) that severed it from contact with the rest of the universe. The races and their langauges, their artifacts and civilizations, that are depicted by Barker, have all arisen from the ashes of this cataclysm on Tekemul. The legends and religions, in fact, are only echoes of whatever existed thousands of years before.
At any rate, this is one of the most complex worlds ever created, with the linguistics probably far more intricate than anything else. For writers, readers, or gameplayers who are interested in world generation, Barker has written the textbook examples.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A one of a kind experience. What to read next? 10 Nov. 1998
By Allan "Worrier" Riise (ariise@online.no) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is incredible good. It is a must for lovers of both scifi and fantasy, with its complex world, and even several languages. When I first read this book back in -86, it immediately put Tolkien down 1 step. Since then i've reread it twice, and it only gets better, and Tolkien must step even further down. If you get hold of a copy of this book, take a week off and enjoy!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Heroic Fiction in the Empire of the Petal Throne 4 Dec. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
M.A.R. Barker, like J.R.R. Tolkein, was a Professor of Languages. In this book, he takes the reader through a portion of the conflict between the religious and political factions of the Empire of Tsolyanu, throws in a couple of love interests, a long-forgotten civilization, and a machine that saves the world after sleeping for uncounted centuries. Recommended for older teens and adults, this story, like most modern science fiction, does contain some topics and descriptions that might be disturbing to younger children.
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