The Man From Laramie 1955 Subtitles

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Anthony Mann directed this brilliant psychological Western reminiscent of Shakespeare's King Lear. James Stewart plays Will Lockhart, who is obsessed with finding the man who sold automatic rifles to the Apaches, resulting in the death of his brother. Will enters the town of Coronado, NM, ruled by the blind and aging patriarch Alec Waggoman (Donald Crisp). Unaware that he is trespassing on Waggoman's land, he finds himself accosted by Alec's sociopathic son, Dave (Alex Nicol), who brutally beats Will and is ready to kill him. But Will is rescued at the last minute by Waggoman's adopted son, Vic Hansbro (Arthur Kennedy). Will finds that Waggoman has become increasingly concerned over who will inherit his vast empire.~ Paul Brenner, All Movie Guide

Starring:
Jack Elam, Cathy O'Donnell
Rental Formats:
DVD

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature universal
Runtime 1 hour 38 minutes
Starring Jack Elam, Cathy O'Donnell, Arthur Kennedy, Aline MacMahon, Wallace Ford, Alex Nicol, Donald Crisp, James Stewart, Aline Mac, John War Eagle
Director Anthony Mann
Studio SONY PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Rental release Limited availability
Main languages English
Subtitles Icelandic, Arabic, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Greek, Swedish, German, Hebrew, Czech, French, Turkish, Hungarian, Portuguese, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Bulgarian, English, Hindi, Polish

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Giorgos Christidis on 4 Jan. 2004
Format: DVD
This is a dark, beautifully photographed western, and -as with all James Stewart movies- one can count on his solid, convincing and totally affable acting. The same could be said about most performances (Donald Crisp and Arthur Kennedy), however there is an evident miscast with the characters of Dave (the foreman) and Barbara (the dismal woman interest). Unlike most films of the genre, the "Man from Laramie" is at its best when filming the psychological tensions and conflicts between characters, rather than action sequences. Columbia did a fine job transferring the film to DVD format, while the extras are Ok, but nothing we haven't seen before. All in all a must buy for anyone who cares about westerns, Stewart, or both.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 April 2005
Format: VHS Tape
"The Man From Laramie" is a great example of the psychological westerns that were popular in the 1950s. Jimmy Stewart plays Will Lockhart, an army Captain who goes undercover to learn who sold rifles to the Apaches, which were then used to kill his brother when a cavalry patrol was ambushed. Lockhart delivers supplies to storekeeper Barbara Waggoman (Cathy O'Donnell) in the isolated town of Coronado, deep in Apache country in New Mexico. He also meets her uncle Alec (Donald Crisp), a wealthy, arrogant cattle baron who is basically a decent man and who loves his worthless son Dave (Alex Nicol). The old man is going blind and is worried that a man will come and kill his son. Trying to reign in the psychopathic Dave is the ranch foreman, Vic (Arthur Kennedy), who is sort of an adopted son to Alec and engaged to Barbara. Of course, the answer to Lockhart's quest is to be found in this tortured family and a lot of people are going to have to die before his obsession finally ends.
This 1955 film, the last Western Stewart did with directed Anthony Mann, owes as much to Shakespeare's King Lear as it does to Freudian psychology. It also features one of the most violent sequences you would find in a Western (for that time) when Dave and his ranch hands roust Lockhart's wagon train loaded with salt. They rope Lockhart, drag him through a fire, burn his wagons and start shooting his mules. Only the arrival of Vic stops Dave from killing Lockhart, setting the stage for his involvement with the Waggomans. The performances by the cast and excellent, with Stewart, Crip and Kennedy are especially good and the film has the additional virtue of having been filmed on location near Sante Fe. "The Man From Laramie" is one of the darkest Westerns, what you might consider the "Unforgiven" of its day.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 26 Sept. 2008
Format: DVD
The last of the collaborations between James Stewart and director Anthony Mann (unless you count the few days Mann worked on Night Passage before falling out with his star), The Man From Laramie is the most ambitious even if it isn't always completely successful. On one level it's a standard revenge Western, with Stewart looking for the gunrunners who caused his brother's death, but his hunt takes in rancher Donald Crisp's powerful but dysfunctional dynasty and its divisions as well, and its through them that the film moves into almost mythically tragic territory. With foreman and almost adopted son Arthur Kennedy devotedly but thanklessly running the ranch for him and constantly trying to protect the old man from the feckless stupidity and sadism of his natural son Alex Nicol it soon becomes clear that not all the bad guys are that bad. Indeed, everything Kennedy does wrong is done out of the best motives that are constantly thwarted, turning what could easily have been a stereotypical villain into a genuinely tragic figure as he realises the man he regards as a second father sees him only as a mere employee (interestingly, James Gray used this same character arc for Joaquin Phoenix's character in The Yards). Even Crisp's autocrat is tormented by recurring dreams of a stranger riding in to destroy his family as he slowly goes blind, believing Stewart to be a virtual horseman of the apocalypse.

Along with the tormented and frustrated characters it's also surprisingly violent for its day.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Lovins TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 28 Dec. 2010
Format: DVD
Columbia Pictures Corporation presents "THE MAN FROM LARAMIE" (1955) (104 min/Color) (Fully Restored/Dolby Digitally Remastered) --Will Lockhart (James Stewart) is obsessed with finding the man who sold automatic rifles to the Apaches, resulting in the death of his brother --- Will enters the town of Coronado, NM, ruled by the blind and aging patriarch Alec Waggoman (Donald Crisp) --- Unaware that he is trespassing on Waggoman's land, he finds himself accosted by Alec's psychopathic son, Dave (Alex Nicol), who brutally beats Will and is ready to kill him --- But Will is rescued at the last minute by Waggoman's adopted son, Vic Hansbro (Arthur Kennedy) --- Will finds that Waggoman has become increasingly concerned over who will inherit his vast empire.

A brilliant psychological Western reminiscent of Shakespeare's King Lear.

James Stewart & Anthony Mann: their 5 westerns together from 1950 to 1955, rewrote the cowboy story for the big screen - their's were tough, psychological though lyric masterpieces of western cinema - beautifully photographed and expertly written stories with intriguing characters and realistic action - a blueprint for westerns of the 50s (and embraced by Budd Boetticher & Randolph Scott in their excellent collaborations in the late 1950s - see the Randolph Scott section of this website)

This, The Man From Laramie (1955) was the fifth and last of this quintet of Stewart / Mann westerns - preceded by Winchester '73 (1950), Bend of the River (1952), The Naked Spur (1954) & The Far Country (1954).
Under the production staff of:
Anthony Mann [Director]
Philip Yordan [Screenwriter]
Frank Burt [Screenwriter]
Thomas T.
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